LINGUIST List 15.220

Thu Jan 22 2004

Calls: Computational Ling/Italy; Text/Corpora/Portugal

Editor for this issue: Andrea Berez <andrealinguistlist.org>


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Directory

  1. Laure.View, International Conference on Formal Ontology in Information Systems
  2. n.oostdijk, Workshop on Compiling and Processing Spoken Language Corpora

Message 1: International Conference on Formal Ontology in Information Systems

Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2004 16:01:56 -0500 (EST)
From: Laure.View <Laure.Viewirit.fr>
Subject: International Conference on Formal Ontology in Information Systems

International Conference on Formal Ontology in Information Systems
Short Title: FOIS 2004 

Date: 04-Nov-2004 - 06-Nov-2004
Location: Torino, Italy
Contact: Laure Vieu
Contact Email: Laure.Vieuirit.fr 
Meeting URL: http://www.fois.org 

Linguistic Sub-field: Computational Linguistics ,Philosophy of
Language ,Semantics ,Text/Corpus Linguistics ,Lexicography ,Cognitive
Science
Call Deadline: 03-May-2004 


Meeting Description:
The purpose of FOIS is to provide a forum for genuine
interdisciplinary exchange in the spirit of an unified ontological
analysis effort. The conference brings together philosophers, computer
scientists and linguists, as well as biologists, economists,
geographers... Although the primary focus of the conference is on
theoretical issues, methodological proposals as well as papers dealing
with concrete applications from a well-founded theoretical perspective
are welcome. 

**** FOIS 2004 CALL FOR PAPERS ****

International Conference on Formal Ontology in Information Systems
http://www.fois.org
November 4-6, 2004, Torino (Italy)

Conference Description

Just as ontology developed over the centuries as part of philosophy,
so in recent years ontology has become intertwined with the
development of the information sciences. Researchers in such areas as
artificial intelligence, formal and computational linguistics,
biomedical informatics, conceptual modeling, knowledge engineering and
information retrieval have come to realize that a solid foundation for
their research calls for serious work in ontology, understood as a
general theory of the types of entities and relations that make up
their respective domains of inquiry. In all these areas, attention has
started to focus on the content of information rather than on just the
formats and languages in terms of which information is
represented. The clearest example of this development is provided by
the many initiatives growing up around the project of the Semantic
Web. And as the need for integrating research in these different
fields arises, so does the realization that strong principles for
building well-founded ontologies might provide significant advantages
over ad hoc, case-based solutions. The tools of Formal Ontology
address precisely these needs, but a real effort is required in order
to apply such philosophical tools to the domain of Information
Systems. Reciprocally, research in the information science raises
specific ontological questions which call for further philosophical
investigations.

The purpose of FOIS is to provide a forum for genuine
interdisciplinary exchange in the spirit of a unified ontological
analysis effort. Although the primary focus of the conference is on
theoretical issues, methodological proposals as well as papers dealing
with concrete applications from a well-founded theoretical perspective
are welcome.
	 

Invited Speakers

Peter Gardenfors, Lund University Cognitive Science, Sweden
Amie Thomasson, Department of Philosophy, University of Miami, USA
	 
	 
Deadlines and Further Information

Abstracts: May 3, 2004
Final submissions: May 7, 2004	
Acceptance Notification: June 25, 2004	
Submission of camera-ready paper: July 30, 2004	

Proceedings will be published by IOS Press and available at the
conference.

Submission is a two-step procedure: first abstracts, then full
papers. Submitted papers must not exceed 5000 words (including
bibliography). Abstracts should be less than 300 words. Electronic
submission via the website is strongly preferred; if unavailable,
submission via email or postal mail is possible. For details see:
http://www.fois.org or contact one of the program chairs.
	 

Chairs

Conference Chair: 
Nicola Guarino (ISTC-CNR, Trento, Italy) nicola.guarinoloa-cnr.it

Program Chairs: 
Achille Varzi (Columbia University, New York, USA) achille.varzicolumbia.edu
Laure Vieu (IRIT-CNRS, Toulouse, France) laure.vieuirit.fr

Local Chairs:
Maurizio Ferraris (University of Torino, Italy) ferrariscisi.unito.it
Leonardo Lesmo (University of Torino, Italy) lesmodi.unito.it 


Topics

We seek high-quality papers on a wide range of topics. While authors
may focus on fairly narrow and specific issues, all papers should
emphasize the relevance of the work described to formal ontology and
to information systems. Papers that completely ignore one or the other
of these aspects will be considered as lying outside the scope of the
meeting.

Topic areas of particular interest to the conference are: 

Foundational Issues
- Kinds of entity: particulars vs. universals, continuants
vs. occurrents, abstracta vs. concreta, dependent vs. independent,
natural vs. artificial
- Formal relations: parthood, identity, connection, dependence,
constitution, subsumption, instantiation
- Vagueness and granularity
- Identity and change
- Formal comparison among ontologies
- Ontology of physical reality (matter, space, time, motion, ...)
- Ontology of biological reality (genes, proteins, cells, organisms,
...)
- Ontology of mental reality and agency (beliefs, intentions and other
mental attitudes; emotions, ...)
- Ontology of social reality (institutions, organizations, norms,
social relationships, artistic expressions, ...)
- Ontology of the information society (information, communication,
meaning negotiation, ...)
- Ontology and Natural Language Semantics, Ontology and Cognition

Methodologies and Applications
- Top-level vs. application ontologies
- Ontology integration and alignment; role of reference ontologies
- Ontology-driven information systems design
- Requirements engineering 
- Knowledge engineering 
- Knowledge management and organization
- Knowledge representation; Qualitative modeling
- Computational lexica; Terminology
- Information retrieval; Question-answering
- Semantic web; Web services; Grid computing
- Domain-specific ontologies, especially for: Linguistics, Geography,
Law, Library science, Biomedical science, E-business, Enterprise
integration, ...
	 

Programme Committee (to be confirmed)

Bill Andersen, OntologyWorks, USA Nicholas Asher, Dept of Philosophy,
University of Texas at Austin, USA
Nathalie Aussenac-Gilles, Research Institute for Computer Science,
CNRS, Toulouse, France
John Bateman, Dept of Applied English Linguistics, University of
Bremen, Germany
Brandon Bennett, Division of Artificial Intelligence, University of
Leeds, UK
Andrea Bottani, Dept of Philosophy, University of Bergamo, Italy
Joost Breuker, Dept of Computer Science & Law, University of
Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Roberto Casati, Jean Nicod Institute, CNRS, Paris, France Werner
Ceusters, Language & Computing, Belgium
Tony Cohn, Division of Artificial Intelligence, University of Leeds,
UK
Robert Colomb, School of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering,
University of Queensland, Australia
Ernest Davis, Dept of Computer Science, New York University, USA
Randall Dipert, Dept of Philosophy, State University of New
York,Buffalo, USA
Martin Dorr, Institute of Computer Science, FORTH, Heraklion, Greece
Carola Eschenbach, Dept for Informatics, University of Hamburg,
Germany
Jerome Euzenat, INRIA Rhone-Alpes, Grenoble, France
Christiane Fellbaum, Cognitive Science Laboratory, Princeton
University, USA & Berlin Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and
Humanities, Berlin, Germany
Maurizio Ferraris, Dept of Philosophy, University of Torino, Italy
Antony Galton, School of Engineering and Computer Science, University
of Exeter, UK
Aldo Gangemi, Institute of Cognitive Sciences and Technologies, CNR,
Rome, Italy
Peter Gardenfors, Lund University Cognitive Science, Sweden
Pierdaniele Giaretta, Dept of Philosophy, University of Padova, Italy
Michael Gruninger, Institute for Systems Research, University of
Maryland College Park, USA & National Institute for Standards and
Technology, USA
Nicola Guarino, Institute of Cognitive Sciences and Technologies, CNR,
Trento, Italy
Patrick J. Hayes, Institute for Human and Machine Cognition,
University of West Florida, USA
Heinrich Herre, Institute of Informatics, University of Leipzig ,
Germany
Jacques Jayez, ENS-Humanities, Lyon, France
Ingvar Johansson, Institute for Formal Ontology and Medical
Information Science, University of Leipzig, Germany
Hannu Kangassalo, Dept of Computer and Information Sciences,
University of Tampere, Finland
Fritz Lehmann, USA
Leonardo Lesmo, Dept of Computer Science, University of Torino, Italy
Bernardo Magnini, Centre for Scientific and Technological Research,
ITC, Trento, Italy
David Mark, Dept of Geography, State University of New York, Buffalo,
USA
William E. McCarthy, Department of Accounting, Michigan State
University, USA
Robert Meersman, Dept of Computer Science, Free University of
Brussels, Belgium
Chris Menzel, Dept of Philosophy, Texas A&M University, USA
Friederike Moltmann, Dept of Philosophy, Stirling University, UK
Philippe Muller, Research Institute for Computer Science, University
of Toulouse III, France
John Mylopoulos, Dept of Computer Science, University of Toronto,
Canada Sergei Nirenburg, Dept of Computer Science & Electrical
Engineering, University of Maryland Baltimore County, USA
Leo Obrst, MITRE, USA 
Massimo Poesio, Dept of Computer Science, University of Essex, UK
Ian Pratt-Hartmann, Dept of Computer Science, University of
Manchester, UK
James Pustejovsky, Dept of Computer Science, Brandeis University, USA
Steffen Schulze-Kremer, German Resource Center for Genome Research,
Berlin, Germany
Peter Simons, School of Philosophy, University of Leeds, UK
Barry Smith, Dept of Philosophy, State University of New York,
Buffalo, USA & Institute for Formal Ontology and Medical Information
Science, University of Leipzig, Germany
John Sowa, USA
Veda Storey, Dept of Computer Information Systems, Georgia State
University, USA
Mike Uschold, The Boeing Company, USA 
Achille Varzi, Dept of Philosophy, Columbia University, USA
Laure Vieu, Research Institute for Computer Science, CNRS, Toulouse,
France
Yair Wand, Management Information Systems Division, University of
British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
Chris Welty, IBM Watson Research Center, USA
Roel Wieringa, Computer Science Department, University of Twente, The
Netherlands
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Message 2: Workshop on Compiling and Processing Spoken Language Corpora

Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2004 16:09:05 -0500 (EST)
From: n.oostdijk <n.oostdijklet.kun.nl>
Subject: Workshop on Compiling and Processing Spoken Language Corpora

Workshop on Compiling and Processing Spoken Language Corpora

Date: 24-May-2004 - 24-May-2004
Location: Lisbon, Portugal
Contact: Nelleke Oostdijk
Contact Email: n.oostdijklet.kun.nl 
Meeting URL: http://lands.let.kun.nl/CPSLC/ 

Linguistic Sub-field: Text/Corpus Linguistics 
Call Deadline: 24-May-2004 

This is a session of the following conference: 4th International
Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation


Meeting Description:

2nd Call for papers 

Workshop on COMPILING AND PROCESSING SPOKEN LANGUAGE CORPORA
	 
http://lands.let.kun.nl/CPSLC/
	 
Centro Cultural de Belem, Lisbon, Portugal
24th May 2004
	 	 
Workshop to be held in conjunction with the 4th International
Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation (LREC 2004)

Main conference: 26-27-28 May 2004
http://www.lrec-conf.org/lrec2004/

Aim

The aim of the workshop is to bring together people working on the
development (compilation and processing) of spoken language corpora.*
The workshop will provide participants with the opportunity to
exchange views and share experiences. Moreover, the workshop is
instrumental in taking stock of and evaluating the present
state-of-the-art. The workshop thus aims to contribute to the
development of a future roadmap that will guide the development of
standards, tools, etc. for use with spoken language corpora.
	 
*The term "spoken language corpora" is used here to distinguish such
corpora from speech corpora or speech databases: speech corpora are
collections of spoken data that are typically recorded for specific
purposes by specific users (speech corpora/databases such as SpeechDat
Car that are used for developing consumer applications). Usually such
databases lack the richness of linguistic annations that is pursued
for spoken language corpora.
	 

Background and motivation

Despite the wide experience gained in the compilation of written
language corpora, working with spoken language data is not immediately
straightforward as spoken language involves many novel aspects that
need to be taken care of. The fact that spoken language is transient
is sometimes offered as an explanation for why it is more difficult to
collect spoken data than it is to compile a corpus of written
data. However, it is not just the capturing of data that is anything
but trivial. Once the (audio) data have been collected and stored, the
next step is to produce some kind of transcript (whether orthographic
or phonetic). Further annotations such as POS tagging, lemmatisation,
syntactic annotation, and prosodic annotation may then build upon this
transcription. Among the problems encountered in the processing of
spoken language data are the following:
	 
- There is as yet little experience with the large scale transcription
of spoken language data. Procedures and guidelines must be developed,
and tools implemented.
- Well-established practices that have originated from working on
written language corpora do not hold up when trying to cope with the
idiosyncracies of the spoken language. This is true for all levels of
linguistic annotation. Annotation schemes need to be reconsidered and
tools must be adapted.
- In so far as standards have emerged (eg CES), they need to be
adapted in order to be able to cater for the needs of spoken language
corpora.
- By their very nature, spoken language corpora bring together speech
and language technologists and linguists from various
backgrounds. Ideally, such corpora should address the needs of all
these different user groups. Often, however, there is a conflict of
interest. For example, the quality of recordings of spontaneous
conversations in noisy environments although highly interesting and
worthwhile from a linguistic perspective will prove too poor to be of
any use to someone doing research into speech recognition.
	 

Workshop topics

Topics of interest include orthographic transcription, phonetic
transcription, prosodic annotation, segmentation, POS tagging and
lemmatisation, parsing, and discourse analysis. Contributions on the
development and implementation of standards or guidelines for spoken
language corpora (annotation schemes, meta-data descriptions) are also
invited, as are contributions describing software for the exploitation
of spoken language corpora.
	 

Format of the Workshop 

The workshop will comprise of oral presentations of previously
submitted papers that went through a double peer review process. The
proceedings of the workshop will be published by the local organising
committee.


Important dates

24th January 2004: Deadline for submission of (full) papers 
1st March 2004: Notification of acceptance and preliminary programme
21st March 2004: Deadline for submission of final versions of accepted
papers for the proceedings
3rd April 2004: Definitive programme 
24th May 2004: Workshop 
	 
Submissions

Prospective authors are invited to submit papers for oral
presentation. Only full papers in English will be accepted, and the
length of the paper should not exceed 6000 words (or the equivalent in
space for diagrams). Submissions in MS Word, Postscript, PDF or RTF
should be submitted through the workshop website:
http://lands.let.kun.nl/CPSLC/
	 
	 
Registration

Workshop participants need to register through the LREC website:
http://www.lrec-conf.org/lrec2004/

The fee for this half-day workshop is 50 Euro for conference
participants and 85 for others and includes a coffee break and the
workshop proceedings.
	 
	 
Organising committee

Nelleke OOSTDIJK, University of Nijmegen
Gjert KRISTOFFERSEN, University of Bergen
Geoffrey SAMPSON, University of Sussex
	 
	 
Programme committee

Daan BROEDER Max Planck Institute
Emanuela CRESTI University of Florence
Gjert KRISTOFFERSEN University of Bergen
Tony MCENERY University of Lancaster
Nelleke OOSTDIJK University of Nijmegen
Pavel IRCING University of Western Bohemia
Geoffrey SAMPSON University of Sussex
Antonio Moreno SANDOVAL University of Madrid
Jean VERNIS Université de Provence
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