LINGUIST List 15.2266

Tue Aug 10 2004

Calls: General Ling/Belgium; Ling Theories/Germany

Editor for this issue: Marie Klopfenstein <marielinguistlist.org>


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Directory

  1. hubert.cuyckens, From Ideational to Interpersonal: Perspectives from Grammaticalization
  2. heike.wiese, Expecting the Unexpected - Exceptions in Grammar

Message 1: From Ideational to Interpersonal: Perspectives from Grammaticalization

Date: Mon, 9 Aug 2004 11:45:46 -0400 (EDT)
From: hubert.cuyckens <hubert.cuyckensarts.kuleuven.ac.be>
Subject: From Ideational to Interpersonal: Perspectives from Grammaticalization


>From Ideational to Interpersonal: Perspectives from Grammaticalization
Short Title: FITIGRA 

Date: 10-Feb-2005 - 12-Feb-2005
Location: Leuven, Belgium
Contact: Hendrik De Smet
Contact Email: fitigraarts.kuleuven.ac.be 
Meeting URL: http://wwwling.arts.kuleuven.ac.be/fitigra 

Linguistic Sub-field: General Linguistics, Historical Linguistics,
Pragmatics, Semantics, Syntax, Text/Corpus Linguistics, Typology
Call Deadline: 01-Nov-2004 

Meeting Description:

''From Ideational to Interpersonal: Perspectives from
Grammaticalization'' is a conference devoted to the study of
semantic-pragmatic change in grammaticalization, from ''ideational''
to ''interpersonal'' (Halliday and Hasan 1976) or from
''propositional'' to ''expressive'' (Traugott 1989).

FROM IDEATIONAL TO INTERPERSONAL: PERSPECTIVES FROM GRAMMATICALIZATION

Leuven, 10-12 February 2005

FIRST CIRCULAR AND CALL FOR PAPERS

Convenors:
Hubert Cuyckens (Functional Linguistics Research Group, University of
Leuven)
Kristin Davidse (Functional Linguistics Research Group, University of
Leuven)
Anne-Marie Simon-Vandenbergen (English Department, University of
Ghent)

Meeting URL: http://wwwling.arts.kuleuven.ac.be/fitigra

Meeting description: 
Since the 1980s, grammaticalization has taken up an important place in
the research of linguists. Following Traugott, grammaticalization can
be described as a robust tendency whereby "lexical items and
constructions come in certain linguistic contexts to serve grammatical
functions or grammatical items develop new grammatical
functions". Importantly, grammaticalization involves "a subset of
crosslinguistically recurring changes that involve correlations across
time between semantic, morphosyntactic (and sometimes also)
phonological changes." (Elizabeth C. Traugott, 2001. "Legitimate
counterexamples to unidirectionality").

As is well known, one tradition in grammaticalization studies has
focused on explorations in morphosyntactic change, building on
Lehmann's ([1982] 1995) seminal study on processes and parameters of
grammaticalization. This type of grammaticalization research mainly
focuses on the change of free syntactic units into highly constrained
morphemes with a grammatical function. A more recent tradition,
initiated by Traugott (1982) and elaborated, e.g., in Traugott (1989,
1995, 1996), focuses on semantic-pragmatic change in
grammaticalization. Based on Halliday and Hasan's (1976) proposal that
there are three functional domains of language, the ideational, the
textual, and the interpersonal, she has proposed that semantic change
in grammaticalization often proceeds along the following cline:

 Propositional > textual > expressive.

This cline has been reformulated as three tendencies which involve
(increasing) pragmatic strengthening, and in which the tendency
towards expressiveness/subjectivity is the most prominent.

The purpose of this conference is to bring together papers that
examine various aspects of grammaticalization within the framework of
the clines ideational > textual > interpersonal and/or propositional >
textual > expressive. As such, we welcome contributions addressing (by
now) familiar issues in grammaticalization such as:
- auxiliarization, the development of discourse markers, etc.
- the importance of pragmatic strengthening/invited
inferencing/subjectification, as they occur in the
cognitive-functional context of speaker-hearer interaction.

Furthermore, we encourage contributions which, within the framework
outlined above, take up newer issue that may necessitate a broader
definition of grammaticalization. These include:
- the study of shifts such as those from head to modifier (Denison
2002) or modifier to intensifier (Adamson 2000) in the NP, a
grammatical environment which has hitherto been relatively neglected
in grammaticalization theory;
- the interplay between grammaticalization and lexicalization, with
the latter understood as the formation of a new lexical item by the
combination of two formerly distinct lexical items (Fischer &
Rosenbach 2000; Lehmann 2002; Van der Auwera 2002 );
- the question whether grammaticalization processes can be predicted
to follow certain structurally determined paths, such as
center-to-periphery directionality in the NP (Rijkhoff 2002);
- the role played in the lexicogrammatical re-organization
accompanying grammaticalization by syntagmatic relations between
lexical items such as collocation (Sinclair 1991), semantic feature
copying (Bublitz 1996), semantic prosody (Stubbs 1995), and pragmatic
feature copying.

Finally, we also seek contributions that highlight the importance of
such usage-based factors as frequency and entrenchment for
grammaticalization, and that, in general, give attention to
quantitative data in support of grammaticalization processes.

Guest speakers:
Teresa Fanego (University of Santiago de Compostela), Manfred Krug
(Freiburg University) have confirmed their participation as keynote
speakers.

Call for papers:
Papers are invited on the aspects of grammaticalization within the
framework outlined above. Presentations will be 20 minutes with 10
minutes question time.

Abstracts should be between 400 and 500 words (exclusive of
references) and should state research questions, approach, method,
data and (expected) results. Abstracts will be reviewed anonymously.

Abstracts should be submitted as Word or as .RTF files. More
information on how to submit abstracts can be found on the conference
website http://wwwling.arts.kuleuven.ac.be/fitigra under "Submit
Abstract".

Information on the venue, accommodation, registration fee, travel
arrangements and social program will be sent out in a second circular
around the end of August 2004.

The deadline for the submission of abstracts is 1 November
2004. Notification of acceptance will be given by 15 November 2004.
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Message 2: Expecting the Unexpected - Exceptions in Grammar

Date: Tue, 10 Aug 2004 04:53:42 -0400 (EDT)
From: heike.wiese <heike.wieserz.hu-berlin.de>
Subject: Expecting the Unexpected - Exceptions in Grammar


Expecting the Unexpected - Exceptions in Grammar 

Date: 23-Feb-2005 - 25-Feb-2005
Location: Cologne, Germany
Contact: Heike Wiese
Contact Email: exceptionsstaff.hu-berlin.de 
Meeting URL: http://www.dgfs.de/cgi-bin/koeln2005.pl 

Linguistic Sub-field: General Linguistics, Language Description,
Linguistic Theories 
Call Deadline: 15-Aug-2004

Meeting Description:

EXPECTING THE UNEXPECTED: EXCEPTIONS IN GRAMMAR
Workshop as part of the 26th Annual Meeting of the German Society for
Linguistics (DGfS)

Organisers: Horst Simon & Heike Wiese (Humboldt-University Berlin)

Keynote speakers:
Frans Plank (University of Konstanz) 
Marga Reis (University of Tuebingen) 
Tom Wasow (Stanford University)

A general goal of scientific theories is to systematise data from a
particular field as completely and as elegantly as possible; ideally,
all phenomena should be accounted for within a simple system.

Is such a methodological aim also adequate for human language? In the
analysis of linguistic data, one frequently faces phenomena that pose
a problem for systematisation because they do not follow the standard
patterns one observes otherwise. The workshop will explore the
theoretical and practical problems that exceptions pose for
grammatical modelling; focussing on questions like:
- How can exceptions be identified? In how far is their special status
tied to the particular grammatical model used?
- Do exceptions constitute sub-systems? Are there special areas in
grammar where exceptions abound?
- How do exceptions emerge diachronically? How are they levelled out
again?
- Are there special acquisitional patterns for exceptions? How are
they affected in situations of language loss? What is their status in
language processing?
- Are exceptions also a part of communication systems of other
species, or are they a species-specific characteristic of the human
language faculty? Do they play a role in language evolution?

REMINDER: Deadline for submission of abstracts is this coming Sunday
(August 15th, 2004)!

Expecting the Unexpected - Exceptions in Grammar

Workshop as part of the 26th Annual Meeting of the German Society for
Linguistics (DGfS) at the University of Cologne, Germany (23rd-25th
February, 2005)

organisers: Horst Simon and Heike Wiese, Humboldt-University Berlin

Keynote speakers:	Frans Plank (University of Konstanz)
			Marga Reis (University of Tuebingen)
			Tom Wasow (Stanford University)

A general goal of scientific theories is to systematise data from a
particular field as completely and as elegantly as possible; ideally,
all phenomena should be accounted for within a simple system.

Is such a methodological aim also adequate for human language? In the
analysis of linguistic data, one frequently faces phenomena that pose
a problem for systematisation because they do not follow the standard
patterns one observes otherwise. There are various ways to deal with
this problem; possible options, as realised in different frameworks,
include:

- ignoring special cases and concentrating on abstract model building
instead,

- reserving a specialised part of the model (the 'lexicon') for
idiosyncrasies,

- dispensing with generalisations altogether and concentrating on
in-depth analyses of case studies.

In addition, some approaches favour 'softer' grammatical models (such
as Prototype Theory or Stochastic Optimality Theory) that can
integrate 'exceptions' without bestowing them a special theoretical
status. Finally, for some models of language change (e.g. those based
on evolutionary theory), the existence of exceptions is an integral
and constitutive part of the theory.

Exceptions can be defined both inter- and intra-linguistically. First,
typologically, exceptions can represent counter-examples to
cross-linguistically formulated general regularities, while they might
constitute a systematic phenomenon in the individual language in which
they occur (cf. e.g. the cases collected in the Constance
Rarit�tenkabinett). Second, in a particular language, exceptions can
represent an idiosyncratic phenomenon that cannot be captured by
intra-linguistic grammatical generalisations and therefore requires
special descriptive efforts.

In the workshop, we want to explore the theoretical and practical
problems that such intra- and inter-linguistic exceptions pose for
grammatical modelling. In particular, the workshop will be dedicated
to the following questions:

- How can exceptions be identified? In how far is their special status
tied to the particular grammatical model used?

- Do exceptions constitute sub-systems? Are there special areas in
grammar where exceptions abound?

- How do exceptions emerge diachronically? How are they levelled out
again?

- Are there special acquisitional patterns for exceptions? How are
they affected in situations of language loss? What is their status in
language processing?

- Are exceptions also a part of communication systems of other
species, or are they a species-specific characteristic of the human
language faculty? Do they play a role in language evolution?

We invite linguists from all persuasions who work on grammatic
modelling and who reflect on methodological issues, in particular
those working in the fields of grammatical theory, typology,
historical linguistics, psycho- and neurolinguistics, and computer
linguistics. General theoretical discussions and analyses of case
studies are equally welcome.

Talks will be 20 minutes each, with 10 minutes of discussion. Please
send an anonymous abstract of max. 500 words, as a text file or Word
file, to exceptionsstaff.hu-berlin.de, by Aug 15th, 2004.

Notification of acceptance or rejection will be sent by email in
September.

For further enquiries please contact:
Horst Simon or Heike Wiese,
Institut f�r deutsche Sprache und Linguistik
Humboldt-Universit�t zu Berlin, Germany

horst.simonunivie.ac.at (until Sept 20th) /
horst.simonrz.hu-berlin.de (from Oct 1st)
heike.wieserz.hu-berlin.de
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