LINGUIST List 15.2558

Tue Sep 14 2004

Qs: 'Miami' Speech Corpus; Canadian English vowels

Editor for this issue: Ann Sawyer <sawyerlinguistlist.org>


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Directory

  1. Lorna Fadden, "Miami" Latin American Spanish Speech Corpus
  2. Juli Cebrian, monophthongal nature of Canadian English /e/ /o/

Message 1: "Miami" Latin American Spanish Speech Corpus

Date: Sat, 11 Sep 2004 15:13:58 -0400 (EDT)
From: Lorna Fadden <faddensfu.ca>
Subject: "Miami" Latin American Spanish Speech Corpus

Dear All, 

We are hoping to use the ''Miami'' Latin American Spanish Corpus, and
we're wondering about it's availability for prosodic research. Does
anyone know how we could obtain it?

Thanks,

Lorna Fadden
Simon Fraser University 
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Message 2: monophthongal nature of Canadian English /e/ /o/

Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 16:38:28 -0400 (EDT)
From: Juli Cebrian <Juli.Cebrianuab.es>
Subject: monophthongal nature of Canadian English /e/ /o/

Dear colleagues,

Are there any studies that show Canadian English (or North American
English varieties) to have a more monophthongal /e/ (as is 'bay') and
/o/ (as in 'go') than other varieties of English? I have seen this
mentioned a couple of times but I have been unable to find any actual
work showing or discussing this. Also, I have some data that show that
some Ontario English speakers produce [eI] almost as [e:], that is,
with very little formant movement (in fact, two speakers from Western
and Northern Ontario). Still, the sources I have checked make no
reference to this. So have English varieties been found to differ in
the gliding nature of the high-mid vowels?

I will post a summary of the answers. 
Thanks,

Juli Cebrian
Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona 

Subject-Language: English; Code: ENG 
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