LINGUIST List 15.259

Fri Jan 23 2004

Calls: General Ling/USA; Computational Ling/Spain

Editor for this issue: Andrea Berez <andrealinguistlist.org>


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Directory

  1. n.elouazizi, Electronic Support Systems (EPSS) as Cognitive Tools
  2. Floriana Grasso floriana, 4th Workshop on Computational Models of Natural Argument

Message 1: Electronic Support Systems (EPSS) as Cognitive Tools

Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2004 10:20:22 -0500 (EST)
From: n.elouazizi <n.elouazizilet.leidenuniv.nl>
Subject: Electronic Support Systems (EPSS) as Cognitive Tools

Electronic Support Systems (EPSS) as Cognitive Tools 
Short Title: EPSS as Cognitive tools 

Date: 21-Jul-2004 - 24-Jul-2004
Location: Orlando, Florida, United States of America
Contact: Noureddine Elouazizi
Contact Email: n.elouazizilet.leidenuniv.nl 

Linguistic Sub-field: General Linguistics 
Call Deadline: 13-Feb-2004 

Meeting Description:

Electronic performance support systems (henceforth EPSS) are defined
as e-environment (software or other) that provide a context within
which the performance of a task (work) is done. These tools are
designed to function as electronic coaching or intellectual
partners. At the heart of the design process of these systems is the
Cognitive Basis on which EPSS steps. A cognitive tool can be described
as computer based application that may also function as knowledge
representation formalisms and which require learners/users to think
critically when using them to represent content being studied or task
being performed. Unlike most software applications, EPSS amplify the
thinking of the learners/user/trainee and engage them, beyond
information processing stage, to a stage of knowledge construction and
analysis. This conceptualisation of EPSS is derived from the theory of
situating cognitive activity in authentic contexts, where it is
suggested learning and doing, or performing do not exist independently
of the activity in which they occur.

The need of rethinking the theoretical base of the design of EPSS and
the need to infuse further insights from learning psychology theories
into the design and testing process stems from the fact that the
instructional and knowledge representation in EPSS is constituted of a
cognitive act (eg. learning/performing) that is underlined by a
specific type of knowledge requirements (eg. declarative knowledge,
procedural knowledge and conceptual knowledge). Characteristics of
various theories in cognitive psychology share the same tenet. This is
true of information processing, situated cognition and cognitive
apprenticeship. As such, the design of EPSS systems have to expand
beyond explanatory and even intelligent help systems, to provide for
the acquisition in the user/learner of domain specific declarative
procedural and metacognitive knowledge structure. Such rethinking of
the design principles behind EPSS might transform EPSS tools into
cognitive tools which are able to support essential higher order
cognitive functions such as reflection, articulation and abstraction
and to provide effective learning that extends to complex task-based
and conceptual arbitrary learning activities. The fact of overlooking
this theoretical base upon which EPSS had to step in all the stages of
its life cycle (conceptualisation, design and evaluation) has led to a
proliferation of EPSS systems/Models that are often developed in an ad
hoc, individual way that led to unmaintainable, unreliable,
ineffective and non-rigorous EPSS systems. This workshop aims to fill
in this gap in the theoretical base upon which EPSS are construed as
well as in the evaluation methods of EPSS systems and hence contribute
to the improvement of the development of theoretical and applied
perspectives of EPSS.

CALL FOR PAPERS

Within the framework of EISTA '04: International Conference on
Education and Information Systems: Technologies and Applications
organised by the IIIS (International Institute of Informatics and
Systemics) we invite academics, e-training corporate and IT-based
human resources development experts to submit their original and
unpublished works on conceptualisation, design, implementation and
evaluation methods of electronic performance support systems (EPSS) in
vocational and educational learning contexts. The precise theme for
which the contributions are invited is Educational and vocational
Electronic Performance Support Systems (EPSS) as cognitive
tools. Submitted contributions that will be considered for
presentation can vary from theoretical issues (eg. Situated cognition,
Information processing, Grounding, Cognition of Learning, Learning
theories etc) to cases studies, software applications, software-based
solutions, Training systems and knowledge based systems. Submitted
contributions must describe work not previously published. They must
not be submitted concurrently to another conference with refereed
proceedings.

Topics 

Conceptualizing and designing EPSS systems requires expertise from
different research disciplines such as (Educational) Technology,
Learning psychology/theories, databases and knowledge base systems,
distributed information systems, Artificial Intelligence (AI) and
Human Computer Interaction (HCI). The workshop will cover all the
topics in the research area of (the cognitive and methodological
aspects) of electronic performance support systems. This includes but
not restricted to:

1.EPSS as e-platforms for (heterogeneous) learning styles 
 Support for declarative learning 
 Support for conceptual learning 
 Support for procedural learning 
2.Systems and Applications of EPSS. 
 Architectures 
 Interface designs/Interface management 
 Intelligent EPSS help systems 
3.EPSS as Agent-Based Knowledge discovery system. 
 Application of techniques of knowledge discovery for EPSS 
 Adaptive EPSS (Acting in open and dynamically changing learning environments). 
4.Methodologies for the development of EPSS 
 Evaluation and quality assessment methodologies 
 Validation and verification techniques 

SUBMISSIONS
Abstract submission 
Please submit a maximum of two pages anonymous abstract including the
title, the list of references. An additional page of figures, data or
demos is optionally requested when appropriate. Together with your
submission, in the body text of the email, please include the
following information: Full name, Affiliation, Mailing address and
phone number, Email Address:

Paper submission 
The length of each paper should not exceed 08 pages. All papers must
be written in English. Submissions will be reviewed for quality,
correctness, originality and relevance. In case of multiple submission
please clearly indicate the name and URL of the respective conference,
workshop, or other media in the submission email. The paper must be
formatted in A4 size using 10 point Times. (If Times is not available,
please use one of the similar fonts widely used in
phototypesetting.). Printing area should be 12.2 x 19.3 cm, and the
interline distance should be arranged in such a way that some 42 to 45
lines occur on a full-text page. Each submission includes the full
paper (title, authors, abstract, text) either in postscript or PDF
format. Please use A4 size when creating the postscript/pdf version of
your paper. Please send your contribution to (Noureddine Elouazizi /
ULCL research institute Leiden University)
n.elouazizilet.leidenuniv.nl
 
IMPORTANT DATES TO REMEMBER
* February 13th, 2004: Deadline to submit the abstracts or paper
drafts (8pages).
* March 03rd , 2004: Notifications of Acceptance. 
* May 05th , 2004: Deadline to submit paper final version. 
* July 21st-24th 2004:Conference 

Proceedings 
Submitted papers will be reviewed by a panel of experts. Accepted
papers will be published by in the proceedings. The Journal of
Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics will publish the top 30% of the
papers presented at the conference.
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Message 2: 4th Workshop on Computational Models of Natural Argument

Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2004 13:48:27 -0500 (EST)
From: Floriana Grasso floriana <Floriana>
Subject: 4th Workshop on Computational Models of Natural Argument

4th workshop on Computational Models of Natural Argument 
Short Title: CMNA 4 

Date: 22-Aug-2004 - 24-Aug-2004
Location: Valencia, Spain
Contact: Floriana Grasso
Contact Email: florianacsc.liv.ac.uk 
Meeting URL: http://www.csc.liv.ac.uk/~floriana/CMNA4.html 

Linguistic Sub-field: Computational Linguistics ,Discourse Analysis
,Pragmatics ,Cognitive Science
Call Deadline: 29-Mar-2004 

Meeting Description:

AI has witnessed a growth in uses of research in the philosophical
theory of argumentation, in informal logic, and in dialectics
throughout many of its subdisciplines. Recent successes include agent
system negotiation protocols that demonstrate higher levels of
sophistication and robustness; argumentation-based models of
evidential relations and legal processes that are more expressive;
models of language generation that use rhetorical structures to
produce effective arguments; groupwork tools that use argument to
structure interaction and debate; computer-based learning tools that
exploit monological and dialogical argument structures in designing
pedagogic environments; decision support systems that build upon
argumentation theoretic models of deliberation to better integrate
with human reasoning; and models of knowledge engineering structured
around core concepts of argument to simplify knowledge elicitation and
representation problems. Similarly, argumentation theory has
benefitted from applied AI work on new tools for teaching and research
in argumentation and critical thinking, and from AI problems and
issues that have offered a proving ground and evaluation framework for
theories of argumentation. Since 2001, the CMNA series, now at its
fourth edition, with its focus on models of ''natural'' argumentation,
has been acting to support this community of researchers, working in
the field overlapping Argumentation Theory and AI. CMNA 4

 4th Workshop on
 Computational Models of Natural Argument

 at ECAI 2004

 http://www.csc.liv.ac.uk/~floriana/CMNA4.html



Important Dates
29 Mar 2004 Deadline long papers
3 May 2004 Deadline short papers
15 May 2004 Notification of acceptance
1 June 2004 Camera-ready papers
22-24 Aug 2004 Workshops at ECAI-2004


Call for Papers 
The series of workshops on Computational Models of Natural Argument is
continuing to attract high quality submissions from researchers around
the world. CMNA 1 was held at ICCS in San Francisco in 2001, CMNA 2
was held at ECAI in Lyon in 2002, and CMNA 3 was held at IJCAI in
Acapulco in 2003. Like the past editions, CMNA 4 intends to recognise
and consolidate the critical mass that research in the field
overlapping Argumentation Theory and Artificial Intelligence has
developed in recent years.

AI has witnessed a growth in uses of research in the philosophical
theory of argumentation, in informal logic, and in dialectics
throughout many of its subdisciplines. Recent successes include agent
system negotiation protocols that demonstrate higher levels of
sophistication and robustness; argumentation-based models of
evidential relations and legal processes that are more expressive;
models of language generation that use rhetorical structures to
produce effective arguments; groupwork tools that use argument to
structure interaction and debate; computer-based learning tools that
exploit monological and dialogical argument structures in designing
pedagogic environments; decision support systems that build upon
argumentation theoretic models of deliberation to better integrate
with human reasoning; and models of knowledge engineering structured
around core concepts of argument to simplify knowledge elicitation and
representation problems. Similarly, argumentation theory has
benefitted from applied AI work on new tools for teaching and research
in argumentation and critical thinking, and from AI problems and
issues that have offered a proving ground and evaluation framework for
theories of argumentation. The CMNA series is acting to support this
community.

Areas of interest
 * The characteristics of ''natural'' arguments: ontological aspects
 and cognitive issues.
 * The use of models from informal logic and argumentation theory,
 and in particular, approaches to specific schools of thought
 developed in informal logic and argumentation.
 * Rhetoric and affect: the role of emotions, personalities,
 etc. in models of argumentation.
 * The roles of licentiousness and deceit and the ethical
 implications of implemented systems demonstrating such features.
 * The linguistic characteristics of natural argumentation,
 including discourse markers, sentence format, referring
 expressions, and style. Persuasive discourse processing
 (discourse goals and structure, speaker/hearer models, content
 selection, etc.). Language dependence and multilingual
 approaches. Empirical work based on corpora looking at these
 topics would be especially welcomed.
 * Non-monotonic, defeasible and uncertain argumentation.
 * Natural argumentation and media: visual arguments, multi-modal
 arguments, spoken arguments.
 * Models of argumentation in multi-agent systems inspired by or
 based upon theories of human argument.
 * Empirically driven models of argument in AI and Law.
 * Evaluative arguments and their application in AI systems (such
 as decision support and advice giving).
 * Issues of domain specificity, and in particular, the
 independence of argumentation techniques from the domain of
 application.
 * Applications of computer supported collaborative argumentation,
 in realistic domains in which argument plays a key role,
 including pedagogy, e-democracy and public debate.
 * Applications of argumentation based systems, including, for
 example, the pedagogical, health-related, political, and
 promotional.
 * Methods to better convey the structure of complex argument,
 including representation and summarisation.
 * Tools for interacting with structures of argument, including
 visualisation tools and interfaces supporting natural, stylised
 or formal dialogue.
 * The building of computational resources such as online corpora
 related to argumentation.
 * In addition to discursive and theoretical pieces, CMNA 4
 specifically encourages early results from applications and
 implementations of the ideas from earlier workshops.


Submission Instructions
The workshop encourages submissions in three categories:
 *Polemic discussion on a burning issue (up to 6000 words)
 * Short papers describing work in progress (up to 3000 words)
 * Demonstration of implemented systems: submissions should be
 accompanied by written reports (up to 3000 words). Authors
 should contact the organisers to ensure suitable equipment is
 available.

Electronic submissions should be received by one of the organisers no
later than 29 March 2004 for long papers, and 3 May 2004 for short
papers and demonstration reports.

It is highly recommended to submit papers using the final camera-ready
ECAI 2004 conference paper style.

Extended versions of the papers accepted to CMNA 1, CMNA 2 and CMNA 3
are currently being solicited for a special issue of the International
Journal of Intelligent Systems. Similar avenues will be explored for
CMNA 4.

All participants are expected to register for the main ECAI 2004
conference, and registration to the workshop is done through the main
conference registration.


Programme Committee 
Leila Amgoud, IRIT, France
Trevor Bench-Capon, University of Liverpool, UK
Simon Buckingham Shum, Open University, UK
Alison Cawsey, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, UK
Fiorella de Rosis, University of Bari, Italy
Rino Falcone, Institute of Cognitive Science and Technology - CNR,
Italy
Tom Gordon, Fraunhofer FOKUS, Berlin, Germany
Nancy Green, University of North Carolina Greensboro, US
Helmut Horacek, University of the Saarland, Saarbr├╝cken, Germany
Peter McBurney, University of Liverpool, UK
David Moore, Leeds Metropolitan University, UK
Henry Prakken, University of Utrecht, The Netherlands
Doug Walton, University of Winnipeg, Canada


Organising Committee
Floriana Grasso (Chair)
Department of Computer Science
University of Liverpool
Liverpool L69 3BF, UK
florianacsc.liv.ac.uk
http://www.csc.liv.ac.uk/~floriana/

Chris Reed
Department of Applied Computing
University of Dundee
Dundee DD1 4HN, UK
chriscomputing.dundee.ac.uk
http://www.computing.dundee.ac.uk/staff/creed/

Giuseppe Carenini
Department of Computer Science
University of British Columbia
Vancouver, B.C. Canada V6T 1Z4
careninics.ubc.ca
http://www.cs.ubc.ca/~carenini/

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