LINGUIST List 15.2694

Wed Sep 29 2004

Diss: Phonetics/Psycholing: Huang: 'Language...'

Editor for this issue: Gayathri Sriram <gayatrilinguistlist.org>


Directory


        1.    Tsan Huang, Language-Specificity in Auditory Perception of Chinese Tones



Message 1: Language-Specificity in Auditory Perception of Chinese Tones

Date: 28-Sep-2004
From: Tsan Huang <huangling.osu.edu>
Subject: Language-Specificity in Auditory Perception of Chinese Tones


Institution: Ohio State University 
 Program: Department of Linguistics 
 Dissertation Status: Completed 
 Degree Date: 25-Jun-1905 
 
 Author: Tsan Huang
 
 Dissertation Title: Language-Specificity in Auditory Perception of Chinese Tones 
 
 Linguistic Field(s): Historical Linguistics; Linguistic Theories;
 Neurolinguistics; Phonetics; Phonology; Psycholinguistics 
 
 Subject Language(s):
 Chinese, Mandarin (Code: CHN) 
 
 
 Dissertation Director(s):
 Elizabeth Hume
 Keith Johnson
 Marjorie K.M. Chan
 
 Dissertation Abstract:
 
 This dissertation investigates the phenomenon of language-specificity in
 the auditory perception of Chinese tones. Chinese and American English
 (AE) listeners participated in a series of perception experiments, which 
 involved short ISIs (300ms in Experiment 1 and 100ms elsewhere) and 
 an AX discrimination (limited stimulus set in Experiments 2 and 3, 
 speeded response in Experiments BJ, RG and YT) or AX 
 degree-of-difference rating (Experiment 4) task. All experiments used 
 natural speech monosyllabic tone stimuli, except Experiment 2, which 
 used sinewave simulations of Putonghua (Beijing Mandarin) tones. AE
 listeners showed psychoacoustic listening in all experiments, paying 
 much attention to onset and offset pitch. Chinese listeners showed 
 language-specific patterns in all experiments to various degrees. The 
 most robust language-specific effects of Putonghua were found in 
 Experiments 1, 3 and 4, where the T214 (as well as T35) neutralization 
 rule shortened the perceptual distance between T35 and T214 (or that 
 between T55 and T35) for Chinese listeners. Cross-dialectal as well as
 age differences were observed among Chinese listeners in Experiments 
 BJ, RG and YT using natural speech stimuli from Putonghua, Rugao (a 
 Jianghuai Mandarin dialect, Jiangsu Province) and Yantai (a Northern 
 Mandarin dialect, Shandong Province), respectively .Listeners generally 
 showed native advantage in perceiving tones in their own dialects. 
 Cross-dialectal tone category correspondences (R44 to T51 and Y55 to 
 T51) caused more confusion for older Rugao and Yantai listeners 
 between the relevant tones. Furthermore, Yantai older listeners, with 
 more sandhi rules in their dialect, showed different perceptual patterns 
 from other listeners, including Yantai young listeners. Since these 
 experiments employed procedures hypothesized to tap the auditory 
 trace mode (e.g. Pisoni, 1973; Macmillan, 1987), language-specificity 
 found in this dissertation seems to support the proposal of an auditory 
 cortical map (Guenther et al. 1999). But the data also suggest that the 
 model need to be refined to account for different degrees of 
 language-specificity, which are better handled by the lexical distance 
 model advanced by Johnson (2004), although the latter model may be a 
 bit too rigid on how much lexical interference is allowed in low-level 
 auditory perception.
Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue