LINGUIST List 15.3218

Tue Nov 16 2004

Jobs: Hungarian/Syntax: Post Doc, U of Edinburgh

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        1.    Daniel Wedgwood, Hungarian & Syntax: Post Doc, University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom



Message 1: Hungarian & Syntax: Post Doc, University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom

Date: 16-Nov-2004
From: Daniel Wedgwood <danling.ed.ac.uk>
Subject: Hungarian & Syntax: Post Doc, University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom


University or Organization: University of Edinburgh 
 Department: Theoretical and Applied Linguistics   
 Job Rank: Post Doc  
 Specialty Areas: Syntax
 Required Language: Hungarian
 
 
 Description:
 
 Postdoctoral Research Associate in Syntax (full-time, fixed term) 
 Salary Scale:  £19,460 - £21,640 p.a.  Grade ARIB
 Vacancy Reference: 3003208 
 
 The School of Philosophy Psychology and Language Sciences (Theoretical and
 Applied Linguistics) is seeking to hire a Research Associate to work on a
 one year ESRC funded project. The project requires the RA to create a
 corpus of Hungarian sentences, translated into English, with relevance for
 the study of information structure (topic/focus). The RA will also be
 involved in the initial analysis of the data and be engaged in writing up
 and presenting the results of the research.   
 
 The successful applicant will have some knowledge of Hungarian and some
 experience in describing syntactic data, ideally with an open-minded
 attitude to theoretical approaches to syntactic analysis. S/he will also
 have completed, or be about to complete, a PhD in theoretical syntax,
 semantics or pragmatics.   
 
 Principal duties: 
 The Research Associate will be responsible for
 - Creating a database of Hungarian sentences illustrating the focus position with   
    their closest English translations. 
 - Working with the Principal Investigators to provide theoretical analyses
   of these data. (These analyses will be couched within the framework of
   Dynamic Syntax, but prior knowledge of that framework is not necessary.) 
 - Assessing the validity of existing analyses of these data and the
   theoretical claims made about them.  
 
 Applications may be made online or by post. For online applications, please
 follow the application procedure at www.jobs.ed.ac.uk
 
 For postal application, please complete and return three copies of the
 application form (including, if possible, email addresses for your
 referees) to the address below. Email: PPLSAppointmentsed.ac.uk  
 
 Further particulars, including details of the application procedure can be
 obtained at (www.jobs.ed.ac.uk) or from Human Resources, University of
 Edinburgh, Charles Stewart House, 9-16 Chambers Street, Edinburgh EH1 1HS,
 Scotland, UK; or Tel. 0131 650 2511 (24 hour answering service). 
 
 Please quote reference no: 3003208
 
 
 Address for Applications:
 
 Ms Shirley Cairns 
 School of Philosophy, Psychology &  Language Sciences
 7 George Square 
 Edinburgh EH8 9JZ 
 Scotland, United Kingdom  
 
 Application Deadline: 15-Dec-2004 
 
 Contact Information:
 
 Dr Ronnie Cann 
 Email: R.Canned.ac.uk 
 Phone: 0131 651 1839 
 Fax: 0131 650 3962 
 Website: http://www.ling.ed.ac.uk/
 
 This announcement was not accompanied by a donation to the LINGUIST List.  
 It is being posted as a service to the discipline.
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