LINGUIST List 15.327

Thu Jan 29 2004

Qs: Recursion Reference; Concord Morphology

Editor for this issue: Naomi Fox <foxlinguistlist.org>


We'd like to remind readers that the responses to queries are usually best posted to the individual asking the question. That individual is then strongly encouraged to post a summary to the list. This policy was instituted to help control the huge volume of mail on LINGUIST; so we would appreciate your cooperating with it whenever it seems appropriate. In addition to posting a summary, we'd like to remind people that it is usually a good idea to personally thank those individuals who have taken the trouble to respond to the query. To post to LINGUIST, use our convenient web form at http://linguistlist.org/LL/posttolinguist.html.

Directory

  1. Mark Seidenberg, Recursion in Scientific American
  2. Lydia Blenn, concord morphology

Message 1: Recursion in Scientific American

Date: Tue, 27 Jan 2004 21:55:31 -0500 (EST)
From: Mark Seidenberg <msseidenbergwisc.edu>
Subject: Recursion in Scientific American

I am looking for a 1980s era article in Scientific American about
recursion. The column was a collection of amusing examples of
recursive structures (in sentences and in real life). I have not been
able to find it by any of the usual means. Does anyone remember
this/know the reference/use it in teaching? It was in one of the
columns that ran after Martin Gardner retired from doing his
Mathematical Games column.

thanks.

Mark Seidenberg 
Mail to author|Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue

Message 2: concord morphology

Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2004 04:03:00 -0500 (EST)
From: Lydia Blenn <blennling.uni-potsdam.de>
Subject: concord morphology

For research about infants' sensitivity to and their use of concord
morphology (here: the same morphological marking of each element
belonging to a syntactic phrase,in my case a noun phrase, e.g. lOS
muchachOS ricOS) I'm looking for languages that make use of this
feature. So far I only know of few of them: Spanish, Swahili, German,
Latin. Do you know others?

Thanks in advance? 
Mail to author|Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue