LINGUIST List 15.3312

Fri Nov 26 2004

Diss: Semantics, syntax:Zeijlstra: Sentential Negation a

Editor for this issue: Maria Moreno-Rollins <marialinguistlist.org>


To post to LINGUIST, use our convenient web form at http://linguistlist.org/LL/posttolinguist.html.

Directory


        1.    Hedde Zeijlstra, Sentential Negation and Negative Concord



Message 1: Sentential Negation and Negative Concord

Date: 22-Nov-2004
From: Hedde Zeijlstra <hedde.zeijlstrauni-tuebingen.de>
Subject: Sentential Negation and Negative Concord


Institution: University of Amsterdam 
 Program: Amsterdam Center for Language and Communication 
 Dissertation Status: Completed 
 Degree Date: 2004 
 
 Author: Hedde Zeijlstra
 
 Dissertation Title: Sentential Negation and Negative Concord 
 
 Dissertation URL:  www.lotpublications.nl
 
 Linguistic Field(s): Semantics; Syntax 
 
 Subject Language(s):
 Dutch (Language Code: DUT) 
 
 Language Family(ies):
 
  Germanic; Romance; Slavic Subgroup 
 
 
 Dissertation Director(s):
 Jeroen Groenendijk
 Hans Bennis
 Hans Den Besten
 
 Dissertation Abstract:
 
 Sentential Negation and Negative Concord describes and explains a series 
 of phenomena that surface in the study of negation as well the typological 
 correlations between these phenomena.
 
 The study focuses on four issues: (i) the way that sentential negation is 
 expressed syntactically, i.e. what are the syntactic properties of 
 negative markers cross-linguistically; (ii) the occurrence of Negative 
 Concord, i.e. the phenomenon that in many languages multiple morpho-
 syntactically negative elements yield only one semantic negation; (iii) 
 the question whether imperative forms of verbs are allowed to occur in 
 negative constructions; and (iv) the interpretation of constructions in 
 which a universal quantifier subject precedes a negative marker: in most 
 languages the negation then outscopes the subject.
 
 Based on the results of Dutch diachronic, Dutch dialectological and cross-
 linguistic research the author shows that all these phenomena can be 
 described in terms of typological implications. For instance, every 
 language that bans true negative imperatives has at least a negative 
 marker that is a syntactic head; and every language with such a negative 
 head marker is on its turn a Negative Concord language.
 
 The author presents a syntax-semantics interface theory of sentential 
 negation and Negative Concord that correctly predicts these typological 
 implications. One of the general conclusions of this study is that n-words 
 (in Negative Concord languages) should not be thought of as negative 
 quantifiers or negative polarity items, but that they should be considered 
 as semantically non-negative indefinites that are syntactically marked for 
 negation.
 
 This study is of relevance to syntacticians, semanticists and scholars in 
 the syntax-semantics interface, as well as to diachronic linguists, 
 dialectologists and typologists.
Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue