LINGUIST List 15.3589

Thu Dec 23 2004

Confs: Update: Ling Theories/Oakland, CA, USA

Editor for this issue: Amy Wronkowicz <amylinguistlist.org>


To post to LINGUIST, use our convenient web form at http://linguistlist.org/LL/posttolinguist.html.

Directory


        1.    Susanne Gahl, Exemplar-Based Models in Linguistics



Message 1: Exemplar-Based Models in Linguistics

Date: 23-Dec-2004
From: Susanne Gahl <gahlosgood.cogsci.uiuc.edu>
Subject: Exemplar-Based Models in Linguistics

Exemplar-Based Models in Linguistics 
 
 Date: 09-Jan-2005 - 09-Jan-2005 
 Location: LSA Annual Meeting, Oakland, CA, United States of America 
 Contact: Alan Yu 
 Contact Email: aclyuuchicago.edu 
 Meeting URL: http://washo.uchicago.edu/symposium.html
 
 Linguistic Field(s): General Linguistics; Linguistic Theories 
 
 Meeting Description: 
 
 Please note that there has been a change in the program for the symposium on
 exemplar-based models in Linguistics to be held at the 2005 LSA meeting. The
 panelists are Rens Bod, Mirjam Ernestus, Chris Johnson, Chris Manning, Janet
 Pierrehumbert, and Andy Wedel. The talks by Allard Jongman and Stephen Goldinger
 have been canceled. The updated schedule will be posted soon on the website for
 the symposium, at http://washo.uchicago.edu/symposium.html
 
 This symposium focuses on exemplar-based models of linguistic representations
 and language processing. Exemplar-based models conceive of linguistic
 representations as consisting in or being directly shaped by speakers' memories
 of specific tokens of linguistic items. Such models have long been considered in
 psychological research, and are being considered in Linguistics by a growing
 number of researchers in such disparate areas as phonetics and phonology (e.g.
 Johnson, 1997, Pierrehumbert, 2002 and elsewhere), morphology (e.g. Bybee,
 2001), syntax (e.g. Bod, 2001), and language acquisition (e.g. Tomasello, 2000).
  Shared strengths of such models lie in their ability to model gradient and
 highly variable phenomena, and in their readiness to utilize data-rich
 resources, such as large and/or detailed corpus-based databases. Shared
 challenges lie in the need to account for speakers' ability to generalize, i.e.
 to learn and apply abstract patterns - those facts that inspired the notion of
 'infinite generative capacity'.
 
 The main purpose of this 3-hour long symposium is to showcase state-of-the-art
 work on exemplar-based models at multiple levels of linguistic representation:
 segmental, word-level, and phrase-level. A second purpose is to bring into focus
 challenges to research on exemplar-based models.
Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue