LINGUIST List 15.44

Tue Jan 13 2004

Qs: Solidarity Politeness; Hale Reference

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Directory

  1. Claudia Bubel, solidarity politeness
  2. Donna Lardiere, Hale (1996) reference to which languages?

Message 1: solidarity politeness

Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2004 05:30:47 -0500 (EST)
From: Claudia Bubel <c.bubelmx.uni-saarland.de>
Subject: solidarity politeness

Dear colleagues,

can anyone point me to references on the rise of solidarity (or
positive) politeness or camaraderie in Western culture(s)? I am sure
there is a more recent mentioning than Brown/Gilman's (1960) claim
that the development of open and egalitarian societies favoured the
solidarity semantic. Thanks in advance,

Claudia 

Subject-Language: English; Code: ENG 
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Message 2: Hale (1996) reference to which languages?

Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2004 09:48:05 -0500 (EST)
From: Donna Lardiere <lardieregeorgetown.edu>
Subject: Hale (1996) reference to which languages?

The late Ken Hale (1996, p. 729), in a commentary on Epstein, Flynn &
Martohardjono (1996) wrote the following, quoted below. Could anyone
let me know which languages these are and kindly provide examples?
Thanks. 

(1) ''Add the suffix -sh to animate nouns to form the dual
and plural, add the same suffix to inanimates to form the singular and
dual.'' 

(2) ''In cardinality DPs, with numerals from 3 through 10,
use the feminine for a masculine noun, and vice versa, and use the
plural form of the noun; with numerals from 11 through 19, use the
singular accusative for the noun, and for the teen subpart of the
numeral, use feminine for a feminine, and for the unit subpart of the
numeral, use feminine for masculine and vice versa.''
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