LINGUIST List 15.563

Thu Feb 12 2004

Qs: Children's Lang; Academic Discourse/Sign Lang

Editor for this issue: Naomi Fox <foxlinguistlist.org>


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Directory

  1. Steve Napoli, Secret/childrens languages
  2. Gillian Moss, Acadmic discourse in sign language

Message 1: Secret/childrens languages

Date: Tue, 10 Feb 2004 15:28:09 -0500 (EST)
From: Steve Napoli <snaps4hotmail.com>
Subject: Secret/childrens languages

I am looking for information on how children manipulate languages to
create their own secret languages. I have read the topics in the
archive, but am looking for some more specific information on the
language called ''Double Dutch'' i have read some things that suggest
that ''Double Dutch'' is the same as Pig Latin, but I don't think that
this is true. Is there any information on how to speak ''Double
Dutch''?

Language-Family: childrens languages; Code: 
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Message 2: Acadmic discourse in sign language

Date: Wed, 11 Feb 2004 10:27:38 -0500 (EST)
From: Gillian Moss <gmossuninorte.edu.co>
Subject: Acadmic discourse in sign language

I have been asked to tutor a module on Written Discourse Analysis for
a Colombian colleague who is doing PhD research on sign language and,
in particular, is interested in the possibility of developing academic
discourse patterns in sign language. My intention is for us to look at
the characteristics of academic discourse in general and at the
historical development of academic discourse in order then to look at
ways in which these characteristics could be developed in sign
language. I would be very interested to know if anyone knows of any
other studies on academic discourse in sign language.

Many thanks for your help.
Gillian Moss
Universidad del Norte
Barranquilla
Colombi 

Subject-Language: Colombian Sign Language; Code: CSN 
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