LINGUIST List 15.806

Sun Mar 7 2004

Qs: Null Subject Langs; Word Boundary Phonemes

Editor for this issue: Naomi Fox <foxlinguistlist.org>


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Directory

  1. Christopher Johns, Null subject languages
  2. Yuri Tambovtsev, the study of the occurrency of sounds

Message 1: Null subject languages

Date: Fri, 5 Mar 2004 10:57:47 -0500 (EST)
From: Christopher Johns <c.s.r.johnsdurham.ac.uk>
Subject: Null subject languages

I'd like to hear from linguists working on the following languages:
Alyawarr, Caviteno, Duka, Garo, Indonesian (Betawi), Malagasy, Timugon
(Murut), Rao, Sre, Yessan-Mayo.

Specifically, I'd like to know if these languages allow null subjects,
and if so, in what situations. Secondary sources on these languages
appear to contradict the descriptive grammars I have consulted in this
respect, so I'm keen to get information from linguists familiar with
these languages first hand.

Thanks in advance for any help you can give.

Chris Johns 
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Message 2: the study of the occurrency of sounds

Date: Sat, 6 Mar 2004 20:25:25 +0600
From: Yuri Tambovtsev <yutambmail.cis.ru>
Subject: the study of the occurrency of sounds

Dear Linguist List colleagues, I'm studying the frequency of
occurrence of sounds (phonemes) at the beginning and end of the word
in different world languages now. I wonder if you can tell me who
studies it and where it is published. In many Turkic languages the
frequency of some groups of consonants and vowels is quite different
at the beginning and end of the word. So far, I have studied Turkish,
Tatar-Baraba, Tatar-Kazan', Uyghur, Jukut, Bashkir and Turkmen. I'm
going to compare their data to the languages of TUngus-Manchurian and
Mongolian family. All of them to Japanese and Korean or Chinese. I
wonder if the data on the languages mentioned above have been
published? Looking forward to hearing from you to yutambhotmail.com
Remain yours sincerely and hopefully Yuri Tambovtsev

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