LINGUIST List 15.873

Sat Mar 13 2004

Calls: Translation/Canada; Computational Ling/USA

Editor for this issue: Marie Klopfenstein <marielinguistlist.org>


As a matter of policy, LINGUIST discourages the use of abbreviations or acronyms in conference announcements unless they are explained in the text. To post to LINGUIST, use our convenient web form at http://linguistlist.org/LL/posttolinguist.html.

Directory

  1. merkled, Translating Canada en traduction: 'The Margins Talk Back'/Les marges r�pondent
  2. emeld, E-MELD Workshop on Digital Language Documentation of Endangered Languages

Message 1: Translating Canada en traduction: 'The Margins Talk Back'/Les marges r�pondent

Date: Fri, 12 Mar 2004 11:39:00 -0500 (EST)
From: merkled <merkledumoncton.ca>
Subject: Translating Canada en traduction: 'The Margins Talk Back'/Les marges r�pondent


Translating Canada en traduction: 'The Margins Talk Back'/Les marges
r�pondent

Date: 10-Mar-2005 - 12-Mar-2005
Location: Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada
Contact: Denise Merkle
Contact Email: merkledumoncton.ca
Meeting URL: http://www.uottawa.ca/associations/act-cats 

Linguistic Sub-field: Applied Linguistics, Discourse Analysis,
Philosophy of Language, Sociolinguistics, Translation, Ling &
Literature
Subject Language: English, French

Call Deadline: 15-Apr-2004 

Meeting Description:

Translating Canada en traduction
EurooeThe Margins Talk Back : Les marges r�pondent

March 10, 11, 12, 2005 at the Universit� de Moncton, New Brunswick

Canada's literary uniqueness in the twenty-first century is to be
found in its complexity. Yet, official bilingualism and two national
literatures reduce Canadian identity to its essential elements,
simplifying the multifaceted tapestry of the cultural
landscape. Contemporary Canada has neither a homogenous anglophone
culture, nor a homogeneous francophone culture; excluded from this
binary model are Fran�ois Par�'s Eurooelitt�rature de l'exigu�t�,Euro
Canada's Amerindian, M�tis and Inuit populations and their oral
traditions that have been pushed to the margins of all aspects of
Canadian life, as well as numerous immigrant groups and their literary
traditions from the four corners of the globe. This colloquium hopes
to attract researchers who will examine what lies on the margins of
official linguistic and cultural dualism in order to nuance and to
paint a more complete portrait of contemporary Canadian literature in
and through translation. The presence of several languages creates a
culture of cultural and linguistic exchange, or a translating culture;
translation reveals the true nature of intercultural relations and the
inequities between the system's centre and periphery, and plays a key
role in all areas of literary creation in Canada.

We invite proposals for papers dealing with one or more aspects of
peripheral literature in translation:
1) relationships and movement between "la litt�rature de l'exigu�t�"
(F. Par�) and minor literature (Deleuze and Guattari) in translation,
and peripheral literature (Even-Zohar's polysystem)
2) from a linguistics standpoint, strategies for translating Canadian
"litt�rature de l'exigu�t�"
3) peripheral literature and its place in the literary system:
a) from a cultural standpoint - francophone, anglophone, Amerindian
and Inuit, immigrant minorities
b) from a sexual standpoint - Gay and lesbian literature
c) from a genre standpoint - children's literature, unpublished
theatre translation
4) translated peripheral and/or hybrid literature and identity
5) translated Canadian literature abroad and its place in the
receiving literary system
PLUS: special sessions
1) Antonine Maillet, translator and translated
2) Acadian literature and translation (import: Longfellow's
%vang�line, exports: France Daigle and Herm�n�gilde Chiasson)

This list is not exhaustive. 

The conference languages are French and English. Papers must not
exceed 20 minutes and will be followed by 10 minutes of discussion.

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION, PLEASE CONSULT THE CATS WEBSITE:
http://www.uottawa.ca/associations/act-cats

Send your 300-word proposal before April 15, 2004 to
Denise Merkle merkledumoncton.ca 
D�partement de traduction et des langues
Universit� de Moncton, FASS, Casier 30
Moncton, New Brunswick E1A 3E9
Fax: +1 (506) 858-4166 ; phone: +1 (506) 854-3259

Please include the following information with your proposal:
Name:
Employer's Name (e.g., university + department):
Mailing address:
Telephone Number:
Fax Number:
Email Address:
Diplomas:
3 recent and important publications:
Summary of your paper proposal (150 words):
Mail to author|Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue

Message 2: E-MELD Workshop on Digital Language Documentation of Endangered Languages

Date: Fri, 12 Mar 2004 13:35:57 -0500 (EST)
From: emeld <emeldlinguistlist.org>
Subject: E-MELD Workshop on Digital Language Documentation of Endangered Languages

E-MELD Workshop on Digital Language Documentation of Endangered Languages 

Date: 15-Jul-2004 - 18-Jul-2004
Location: Detroit, MI, United States of America
Contact: Naomi Fox
Contact Email: foxlinguistlist.org 
Meeting URL: http://emeld.org/workshop/2004/ 

Linguistic Sub-field: Computational Linguistics, Language Description

Call Deadline: 05-Apr-2004 

Meeting Description:

E-MELD Language Digitization Workshop: Databases and Best Practice

The E-MELD (Electronic Metastructure for Endangered Languages Data)
Project is a five-year project funded by the National Science
Foundation with a dual objective: to aid in the preservation of
endangered languages data and documentation and to aid in the
development of the infrastructure necessary for effective
collaboration among electronic archives. As part of the effort to
promote consensus on best practices in digital language resources,
E-MELD is hosting its fourth workshop on issues in digitizing
endangered language documentation July 15-18, 2004.

The focus for the 2004 workshop will be 'Databases and Best
Practice'. A database can be a valuable utility in handling linguistic
data, and although the use of a database in itself does not promote
digital best practices, there are ways to use databases that are
consonant with best practice. Current recommendations in the E-MELD
School of Best Practice (http://emeld.org/school) include archiving
irreplaceable text data in .txt file format with XML markup; however,
this format is not always optimal for working with linguistic
data. Using a database can be a valuable tool for managing linguistic
data.

E-MELD welcomes 1-page abstracts of papers which address the issue of
databases in best practice. We also invite descriptions of electronic
tools which support best practice in linguistic documentation for
inclusion in a demonstration session. The deadline for abstracts is
April 5.

Please submit your abstract online at
http://emeld.org/workshop/2004/paper-abstract-submission.cfm.

Abstracts should be one page in length, with an additional page
allowed for tables, images, or references.

The workshop will consist of general sessions, demonstrations of tools
useful for linguistic data preparation, and working group sessions in
which the workshop participants will provide input on best practices
in digital language documentation and advise on the expansion of the
School of Best Practice (http://emeld.org/school). We particularly
welcome the participation of field linguists in the workshop.

The conference website is located at
http://emeld.org/workshop/2004. For more information, visit the E-MELD
website (http://emeld.org) or the School of Best Practice
(http://emeld.org/school), or e-mail us
(emeldlinguistlist.org). Previous topics for E-MELD workshops include
Interlinear Text (http://emeld.org/workshop/2003), Digitizing Lexical
Information (http://emeld.org/workshop/2002), and The Need for
Standards (http://linguistlist.org/~workshop/).
Mail to author|Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue