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LINGUIST List 16.1794

Tue Jun 07 2005

Diss: Socioling: Jonsson: ' Code-switching in ...'

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        1.    Carla Jonsson, Code-switching in Chicano Theater: Power, Identity and Style in Three Plays by Cherríe Moraga


Message 1: Code-switching in Chicano Theater: Power, Identity and Style in Three Plays by Cherríe Moraga
Date: 07-Jun-2005
From: Carla Jonsson <carla.jonssonengelska.umu.se>
Subject: Code-switching in Chicano Theater: Power, Identity and Style in Three Plays by Cherríe Moraga


Institution: Umeå University
Program: Department of English
Dissertation Status: Completed
Degree Date: 2005

Author: Carla Jonsson

Dissertation Title: Code-switching in Chicano Theater: Power, Identity and Style in Three Plays by Cherríe Moraga

Dissertation URL: http://www.diva-portal.org/umu/theses/abstract.xsql?dbid=498

Linguistic Field(s): Ling & Literature
                            Sociolinguistics

Subject Language(s): English (ENG)
                            Spanish (SPN)

Dissertation Director:
Kenneth Hyltenstam

Dissertation Abstract:

The thesis examines local and global functions of code-switching and
code-mixing in Chicano theater, i.e. in writing intended for performance.
The data of this study consists of three published plays by Chicana
playwright Cherríe Moraga.

Distinguishing between code-switching and code-mixing, the investigation
explores local and global functions of these phenomena. Local functions of
code-switching are functions that can be seen in the text and, as a
consequence, can be regarded as meaningful for the audience of the plays.
These functions are examined, focussing on five loci in which
code-switching is frequent and has clear local functions. The loci are
quotations, interjections, reiterations, 'gaps' and word/language play.
Global functions of code-switching and code-mixing operate on a higher
level and are not necessarily detected in the actual texts. These functions
are discussed, focussing on two main areas, namely power relations
(addressing questions of domination, resistance and empowerment) and
identity construction (addressing questions of how identity can be
reflected by use of language and how identity is constructed and
reconstructed by means of language).

The study suggests that code-switching fills creative, artistic and
stylistic functions in the plays and that code-switching and code-mixing
can serve as responses to domination in that they can be used to resist,
challenge and ultimately transform power relations.

Key words: code-switching, code-mixing, local functions, global functions,
Chicano, Chicano theater, Chicano discourse, Spanish, English, style,
power, identity, ethnicity, border culture, hybridity, third space,
language ideology, resistance, symbolic domination, symbolic marketplaces,
double-voicedness, heteroglossia, empowerment.





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