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LINGUIST List 16.2130

Mon Jul 11 2005

Calls: General Ling/Russia; General Ling/Spain

Editor for this issue: Kevin Burrows <kevinlinguistlist.org>


As a matter of policy, LINGUIST discourages the use of abbreviations or acronyms in conference announcements unless they are explained in the text. To post to LINGUIST, use our convenient web form at http://linguistlist.org/LL/posttolinguist.html.
Directory
        1.    Andrey Filchenko, Languages of Europe and North and Central Asia
        2.    Anna Gavarró, GLOW workshops


Message 1: Languages of Europe and North and Central Asia
Date: 11-Jul-2005
From: Andrey Filchenko <andreifrice.edu>
Subject: Languages of Europe and North and Central Asia


Full Title: Languages of Europe and North and Central Asia
Short Title: LENCA-3

Date: 27-Jun-2006 - 30-Jun-2006
Location: Tomsk, Russia
Contact Person: Andrey Y. Filchenko
Meeting Email: tomskeva.mpg.de
Web Site: http://www.lenca3.siblang.org

Linguistic Field(s): Anthropological Linguistics; General Linguistics;
Historical Linguistics; Language Description; Pragmatics; Semantics; Syntax;
Typology

Call Deadline: 15-Dec-2005

Meeting Description:

The 'Grammar and Pragmatics of Complex Sentences in Languages spoken in Europe
and North and Central Asia (LENCA-3)' symposium will take place on 27-30 Jun
2006 in Tomsk, Russia.

The theme of the LENCA-3 symposium centers on structural and semantic features
of complex sentences: different strategies of subordination and coordination
employed by languages, their geographic distribution and historical development,
discourse-pragmatic features of their usage as a means of ensuring inter-clausal
coherence, i.e. the semantic-pragmatic connectivity of the functional dimension
of event integration vis-à-vis the syntactic dependency (grammatical bonds) of
clause integration.

It is anticipated that a number of presentations will deal with these various
aspects of complex sentences from a Siberian areal perspective. That is, the
conference aims to encourage the development of a local typological view of
complex sentences in languages native to Western and Central Siberia (such as
Khanty, Selkup, Nenets, Evenki, Ket, Siberian Turkic, etc.), as well as possible
contact influence from Russian. However, both a general typological and a
historical perspective as a means to inform this discourse will be welcomed.

The organizing committee of the third international symposium on the languages
spoken in Europe and North and Central Asia (LENCA) to be held at Tomsk State
Pedagogical University, Tomsk, Russia, on June 27-30, 2006, announces the CALL
FOR PAPERS for LENCA-3.

Europe and North and Central Asia form a large natural geographical area for
distribution of languages spoken in the area, and for diffusion of peoples and
cultures. This area is the geographical basis for the LENCA-project which forms
a framework for research of these languages and collecting information on these
languages.

The LENCA-1 symposium on the languages belonging to the LENCA-group was at the
Udmurt State University, I?evsk, Udmurtia, Russia in 2001. The topic of the
first symposium was ''Deixis and quantification'' in languages spoken in Europe
and North and Central Asia. The LENCA-2 symposium took place at the Kazan State
University in 2004, with the theme ''Argument structure and grammatical relations''.

The theme of the LENCA-3 symposium centers on structural and semantic features
of complex sentences: different strategies of subordination and coordination
employed by languages, their geographic distribution and historical development,
discourse-pragmatic features of their usage as a means of ensuring inter-clausal
coherence, i.e. the semantic-pragmatic connectivity of the functional dimension
of event integration vis-à-vis the syntactic dependency (grammatical bonds) of
clause integration.

It is anticipated that a number of presentations will deal with these various
aspects of complex sentences from a Siberian areal perspective. That is, the
conference aims to encourage the development of a local typological view of
complex sentences in languages native to western and central Siberia (such as
Khanty, Selkup, Nenets, Evenki, Ket, Siberian Turkic, etc.), as well as possible
contact influence from Russian.

The scale, depth, terminology, and methodology of existing descriptions in this
area vary considerably, and with this in mind one of the objectives envisioned
for the symposium is to facilitate a negotiation of theoretical frameworks,
methodologies, terminologies, and data as a prerequisite for further advancing
of the topic. To this end, both a general typological and a historical
perspective as a means to inform this discourse will be welcomed.

PLENARY SPEAKERS (CONFIRMED):
Dr. Balthasar Bickel, University of Leipzig, Germany
Dr. Bernard Comrie, MPI for , Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
Dr. Alexander Kibrik, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Russia
Dr. Osahito Miyaoka, Osaka Gakuin University, Japan
Dr. Vladimir Plungian, Institute of Linguistics of the Academy of Science,
Moscow, Russia
Dr. Edward Vajda, Western Washington University, USA
Dr. Robert D. Van Valin, University of New York, Buffalo, USA

IMPORTANT DATES:
Deadline for submitting abstracts: 15-December-2005
Notification of acceptance: 15-February-2006
Time of the symposium: 27-30-June-2006

ABSTRACT REQUIREMENTS:
Anonymous abstracts in English or Russian are to be submitted to the Programme
Committee in electronic version by e-mail at eva.mpg.de> and should not
exceed two pages in length, including examples, notes, and bibliography (1 page
of text and 1 page of examples and references). Please adhere to the
requirements for formatting of abstracts. The text of the abstract is to be
submitted as an attachment following these guidelines:

- format the title: Times New Roman, bold, size 12, all caps, aligned by center
- format the body of the text and the list of references: (MS Word .DOC or
.RTF); Times New Roman, size 12, paragraph break 1cm, line interval 1,5; margins
- all 2,5 cm
- citations in text to be noted in square brackets, as follows [1, p.134], [2,
p. 567]
- bibliography list to be added in the end listed in the order of appearance;
the title ''References'': Times New Roman, font size 12 regular, title aligned
by center
- examples: please number and, when possible, use IPA font (SILDoulosIPA)
and/or Unicode font (DoulosSIL)
- body of the e-mail should contain the title and the information about the
author: name & affiliation

Accepted abstracts will be published for the symposium, and an internet version
of the collection of abstracts will be available at the symposium website.
Authors are encouraged to design their abstracts with the view that most of the
papers presented at the symposium could be published later in the proceedings or
selected papers volume.

OFFICIAL LANGUAGES
Russian, English

CONTACT INFORMATION
Contact Persons: Elizaveta Kotorova, Andrey Filchenko, Pirkko Suihkonen
E-MAIL of the conference: tomskeva.mpg.de
URL of the conference (English and Russian): http://www.lenca3.siblang.org
Mirror Site: http://www.ling.helsinki.fi/uhlcs/LENCA/LENCA-3/lenca-3.html
Message 2: GLOW workshops
Date: 11-Jul-2005
From: Anna Gavarró <anna.gavarrouab.es>
Subject: GLOW workshops



Full Title: GLOW workshops

Date: 05-Apr-2006 - 05-Apr-2006
Location: Barcelona, Spain
Contact Person: Anna Gavarró
Web Site: http://seneca.uab.es/ggt/glow2006/workshops.htm

Linguistic Field(s): General Linguistics

Call Deadline: 01-Nov-2005

Meeting Description:

GLOW Workshops, Barcelona, 5th April 2006

Workshop 1: Adjuncts/Modifiers
Workshop 2: Approaches to phonological opacity
Workshop 3: Prosodic phrasing
Workshop 4: Acquisition of the syntax and semantics of number marking

Workshop 1: Adjuncts/Modifiers

Invited speaker: JUAN URIAGEREKA (University of Maryland)

Organisers: M. Teresa Espinal (UAB) & Jaume Mateu (UAB-UOC)

The status of the argument-adjunct distinction is not as clear as one would
expect given the latest developments in the theory of grammar, not only within
the minimalist program, but also from other theoretical perspectives. In
addition, the correspondence between syntactic adjuncts and semantic modifiers
has not been provided yet with a clear-cut analysis.

Addressed to both syntacticians and semanticists, this workshop aims to provoke
discussion on how adjuncts are licensed at the syntax-semantics interface and
how they are interpreted.

This topic covers various subtopics: what sort of linguistic object an adjunct
is, the argument-adjunct distinction, the derivation of adjuncts and the
conditions of adjunct placement, the adjunct-disjunct (parenthetical)
distinction, the status of adjuncts with regard to argument structure, the
syntactic and semantic features that determine the distribution of adverbs and
their licensing as different types of adverbial modifiers, adverbial modifiers
as event quantifiers and as event predicates, the existence of obligatory
adjuncts, etc.

There will be 8 slots for presentations, which will be 30 minutes, followed by
10 minutes for discussion. Abstracts should be one page long, with references
(not data) on a second page, if necessary; do not use a font smaller than 12
point. Two copies of the abstract should be sent as attached PDF files: one
should be anonymous (the name(s) and the title of the abstract should be clearly
mentioned in the e-mail) and the other should have the authors' Name(s),
Affiliation(s) and email(s). Please write the (first) author's name plus the
word 'abstract' in the subject line of the message (e.g. 'Smith abstract').

Abstracts must be sent to cg.adjunctsuab.es
Deadline for submission of abstracts: November 1st, 2005


Workshop 2: Approaches to phonological opacity

Commentator: RICARDO BERMúDEZ-OTERO (U. of Newcastle upon Tyne)

Workshop organisers: Eulàlia Bonet (UAB) and Maria-Rosa Lloret (U. of Barcelona)

Over the years, opacity has been a major theme in phonological research, but,
despite the attention received, the issue is far from being settled. Opacity
effects refer either to surface forms that have undergone a process although
they do not match the criteria for its application at the surface level
('overapplication'), or to surface forms that fail to undergo aprocess although
their shapes match the criteria for it to apply ('underapplication').
Opacity is predicted by any theory allowing intermediate levels of analysis,
that is, serial theories: overapplication instances are cases of application of
a process at a non-surface level with the context for its application being
wiped out by a later process. Underapplication instances, instead, are cases of
non-application at the surface level that are controlled by a non-surface level.
Opacity, thus, constitutes an area where serial approaches to phonology excel.
Contrariwise, opacity effects are the main challenge for parallel approaches to
phonology and its resolution often entails the introduction of otherwise
unneeded devices. The interest on opacity has nowadays revived because it
questions the basic architecture of Optimality Theory, which is generally
assumed to be global and parallel.

In serial modular theories (such as Lexical Phonology) the opacity issue raises
interesting questions concerning the finding of independent motivation for
strata and the way of restricting the number of strata universally. In parallel
approaches, the most important issue raised by opacity --if it is solved-- is
the theoretical cost of the devices introduced to account for it. Within
Optimality Theory, it further remains to be investigated if a serial approach to
Optimality Theory (such as OT-LP) is a more restricted way of capturing opacity
than its alternatives (e.g., Sympathy Theory, Output-to-Output Correspondence,
Local Conjunction, Comparative Markedness, Candidate Chains). The implications
of both approaches to learnability and language typology also remain to be seen.
A further issue to be discussed is whether cases of opacity really exist within
one and the same level (or stratum), and whether they can be dealt with under
the auspices of either of the two competing architectures or they call for a
rule-based approach to phonology. Finally, it has been shown that some alleged
cases of opacity were not really such when the data were reexamined. Since
theories vary in the range of opacity effects they predict, it is important to
have opacity phenomena well supported empirically.

There will be 8 slots for presentations, which will be 30 minutes, followed by
10 minutes for discussion. Abstracts should be one page long, with references
(not data) on a second page, if necessary; do not use a font smaller than 12
point. Two copies of the abstract should be sent as attached PDF files: one
should be anonymous (the name(s) and the title of the abstract should be clearly
mentioned in the e-mail) and the other should have the authors' Name(s),
Affiliation(s) and email(s).

Abstracts must be sent to cg.opacityuab.es.
Deadline for submission of abstracts: November 1st, 2005


Workshop 3: Prosodic phrasing

Invited speaker: ELISABETH SELKIRK (UMASS, Amherst)

Workshop organisers: Pilar Prieto (ICREA-UAB, Barcelona) and Sónia Frota
(University of Lisbon)

Generative approaches to the syntax-phonology mapping have emphasized the
correspondence between grammatical boundaries and prosodic ones, and the role of
syntax on the prediction of prosodic phrase boundaries across languages.
Constraints such as edge alignment to syntactic constituents or heads (Selkirk
1986, 1995, 2000, Nespor & Vogel 1986), non-branching of constituents in
p-restructuring (Nespor & Vogel 1986) and the demand that each maximal
projection (XP) be contained in a phonological phrase (Truckenbrodt 1995, 1999)
have been extensively used. Yet, in some recent work it is becoming clear that
these three basic syntactic conditions (Align/Branching/Wrap constraints) are
not sufficient and that prosodic constraints might play an important role on
phrasing decisions (Ghini 1993, Sandalo & Truckenbrodt 2003, Selkirk 2000, 2005,
Jun 2003, Elordieta et al in press, Prieto in press). One of the aims of this
workshop will be to assess the relevance of syntactic and prosodic constraints
(and their interaction) in predicting prosodic phrase location across languages.

This workshop aims to discuss issues on the interaction of prosody, syntax, and
information structure, from an interdisciplinary point of view. With this goal
in mind, we welcome researchers interested in any area of prosodic phrasing,
especially the relationship between prosody, syntax, and information structure.
We also hope to extend the discussion to other related phenomena such as prosody
and processing (production and perception of prosodic phrasing) and the phonetic
modelling of phrasing levels (phonetic cues to different levels of prosodic breaks).

Topics of Discussion

The Relationship Between Prosody and Syntax
The Relationship Between Prosody and Information Structure
Prosody and Processing (Production, Perception, Implicit Prosody)
Prosodic Modelling of Phrasing
Phonetic Cues to Different Levels of Prosodic Phrasing

We welcome the submission of abstracts for 30 minute presentations on any area
of prosodic phrasing. Abstracts should be one page long, with references (not
data) on a second page, if necessary; do not use a font smaller than12 point.
Two copies of the abstract should be sent as attached PDF files: one should be
anonymous (the name(s) and the title of the abstract should be clearly mentioned
in the e-mail) and the other should have the authors'Name(s), Affiliation(s) and
email(s).

Abstracts must be sent to cg.phrasinguab.es.
Deadline for submission of abstracts: November 1st, 2005
Write to the same e-mail address if you have any queries about the workshop.


Workshop 4: The acquisition of the syntax and semantics of number marking

Invited speaker: CARSON SCHÜTZE (UCLA)

Workshop organisers: Anna Gavarró (UAB) & Maria Teresa Guasti (U. Milano-Bicocca)

In recent years a clearer picture of language acquisition has been emerging:
while some parameterised features of grammar are fixed early on (for example,
those granting word order), other phenomena constitute systematic departures of
child grammar from adult grammar (resulting, for example, in periods of apparent
optionality).

In this workshop we will consider the expression of number. The values that the
number feature may take is a source of variation across languages and number
features materialise in structurally diverse configurations. Number may be
involved in agreement between subject and verb, agreement between object and
verb, number contrasts of clitic pronouns, agreement between Ns and As within
NP, agreement between articles and Ns within DP, number contrasts of determiners
(in languages without articles), and expression of quantificational determiners
(e.g. 'Three dogs are barking'). Recent accounts of the latter suggest that
children distinguish between numbers and other quantificational determiners and
that numbers elicit some kind of interpretation more easily than other
quantificational determiners; in this respect it is interesting that certain
languages do not have a full range of number words. In general, while the
realisation and distribution of number varies cross-linguistically, it is a
quite robust dimension of many languages, including creoles. If a number feature
is universally available to the child, we may ask as to the way in which it
appears in any given language.

In this workshop we set out to investigate if the development of number(s) is
homogeneous across child languages or not, and, if it is not, which are the
factors determining the variation: phonological factors, e.g. related to the
possibly affixal character of number, syntactic-semantic factors, e.g. related
to the (un)interpretable character of the feature, or factors strictly related
to the computational system, e.g. whereby the maturation of certain principles
may bring with them delay in the emergence of a feature. We aim also at
exploring how children learn number words, amongst other quantification
expressions, and their interpretative properties.

There will be 8 slots for presentations, which will be 30 minutes, followed by
10 minutes for discussion. Abstracts should be one page long, 12 point, with
references (not data) on a second page, if necessary. Two copies of the abstract
should be sent as attached PDF files: one should be anonymous (the name(s) and
the title of the abstract should be clearly mentioned in the e-mail) and the
other should have the authors' name(s), affiliation(s) and email(s).

Abstracts must be sent to cg.acquisitionuab.es.
Deadline for submission of abstracts: November 1st, 2005.

For further information, see http://seneca.uab.es/ggt/glow2006/workshops.htm



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