LINGUIST List 16.222

Mon Jan 24 2005

Confs: Applied Ling/Lang Acquisition/Washington DC, USA

Editor for this issue: Amy Wronkowicz <amylinguistlist.org>


To post to LINGUIST, use our convenient web form at http://linguistlist.org/LL/posttolinguist.html.

Directory


        1.    Heather Weger-Guntharp, Georgetown University Round Table on Languages and Linguistics



Message 1: Georgetown University Round Table on Languages and Linguistics

Date: 23-Jan-2005
From: Heather Weger-Guntharp <gurtgeorgetown.edu>
Subject: Georgetown University Round Table on Languages and Linguistics

Georgetown University Round Table on Languages and Linguistics 
 Short Title: GURT 2005 
 
 Date: 10-Mar-2005 - 13-Mar-2005 
 Location: Washington DC, United States of America 
 Contact: Heidi Byrnes 
 Contact Email: gurtgeorgetown.edu 
 Meeting URL: http://www.georgetown.edu/events/gurt/2005
 
 Linguistic Field(s): Applied Linguistics; General Linguistics; Language
 Acquisition; Linguistic Theories; Sociolinguistics 
 
 Meeting Description: 
 
 We invite you to attend the Georgetown University Round Table on Languages and
 Linguistics (GURT) 2005 on the campus of Georgetown University from Thursday,
 March 10, to Sunday, March 13, 2005. 
 
 The theme of the conference is:  EDUCATING FOR ADVANCED FOREIGN LANGUAGE
 CAPACITIES: CONSTRUCTS, CURRICULUM, INSTRUCTION, ASSESSMENT. 
 
 The full conference schedule is available online at
 http://www.georgetown.edu/events/gurt/2005
 where you can find full details on our plenary speakers (Langacker, Matthiessen,
 Norris, Swain, and Wertsch), our invited symposia (chaired by Doughty, Lantolf,
 Ortega, Stutterheim & Carroll, and Walker), our colloquia, and our
 pre-conference workshops that will kick off the conference.  Information on
 registration, accommodations, and travel is also available. 
 
 The conference will focus on all aspects of instructed foreign language learning
 to advanced levels, a topic that has begun to attract considerable attention of
 late, not least because of an interest in sustaining the language of heritage
 language speakers and in assuring high levels of language competence for
 Americans working in a global environment. 
 
 Central strands for the conference are:  (1) theories of language for learning
 and teaching a foreign language to advanced levels, (2) curriculum construction
 in support of advanced foreign language acquisition, (3) instructional
 approaches that foster advanced-level foreign language capacities, from the
 standpoint of learners and teachers, and (4) assessment of advanced foreign
 language abilities, both within a programmatic environment and outside of it.  
 
 Please contact gurtgeorgetown.edu if you have any questions.
Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue