LINGUIST List 16.3

Mon Jan 10 2005

Diss: Phonetics: Jaakkola: 'Lexical Quantity ...'

Editor for this issue: Maria Moreno-Rollins <marialinguistlist.org>


To post to LINGUIST, use our convenient web form at http://linguistlist.org/LL/posttolinguist.html.

Directory


        1.    Toshiko Jaakkola, Lexical Quantity in Japanese and Finnish



Message 1: Lexical Quantity in Japanese and Finnish

Date: 01-Jan-2005
From: Toshiko Jaakkola <toshiko.jaakkolahelsinki.fi>
Subject: Lexical Quantity in Japanese and Finnish


Institution: University of Helsinki 
 Program: Department of Phonetics 
 Dissertation Status: Completed 
 Degree Date: 2004 
 
 Author: Toshiko Isei Jaakkola
 
 Dissertation Title: Lexical Quantity in Japanese and Finnish 
 
 Linguistic Field(s): Phonetics
 
 Subject Language(s): Finnish (FIN)
                      Japanese (JPN)
 
 
 Dissertation Director(s):
 Antti Iivonen
 
 Dissertation Abstract:
 
 Despite the fact that Finnish and Japanese differ from each other typologically,
 remarkable similarities between them can be heard. The most obvious common
 phonetic feature may be the linguistically distinctive quantity in both vowels
 and consonants. In the present study I investigated the similarities and
 differences of lexical quantity in Finnish and Japanese. So far, no large
 systematic phonetic comparative study on these two languages exists. 
 
 As background, I discuss the sound systems of each language, including segments,
 phonotactics, syllable structures, as well as rhythm and timing issues, all
 being closely related to quantity. The major experiments were concentrated on
 production and perception of quantity: (1) the segmental, syllabic and word
 durational ratios of bisyllabic nonsense words with /C1V1(V1)C1(C1)V1(V1)/
 structure (2-5 moraic words) were measured and (2) using synthetic speech
 stimuli, the perceptual boundary ranges in equivalent structures were compared
 and correlated with three fundamental frequency and intensity patterns in order
 to observe their influence on quantity perception. In addition, I conducted
 perception tests on the Finnish /(C)VnC1(C1)V/ structure with the Japanese
 speakers, and compared the durational ratios of the nasal consonant in the
 /CV-n/N-C1(C1)V/ structure both in isolation and a sentence. I also discuss the
 durations of /h/ in Japanese and the Finnish /hV/ and /CV1hCV2/ structures. In
 each experiment, the syllable concept was used for both languages, but the
 'linearity' or 'isochronicity' based on the Japanese mora hypothesis was also
 taken into consideration.
  
 In Chapter 3, utilising the structure /C1V1(V1)C1(C1)V1(V1)/, the results showed
 that (1) the segmental ratios were smaller in Finnish, and the durational
 variations were relatively narrower and more stable in Finnish than in Japanese;
 (2) in both languages, the segmental durations depended not only on the syllable
 structure but also on the syllable position in the word; (3) both languages
 showed similar stepwise patterns in increasing ratios, but Japanese showed
 greater linearity (isochronicity), according to the number of syllables/morae,
 regardless of the number of phonemes, while Finnish showed a greater dependence
 on the number of phonemes within the comparable syllable structure; (4) the
 segmental durational ratios within the word showed negligible differences
 between the languages. In Chapter  4, I used the short/long vowels/consonants in
 /C1V1(V1)C1(C1)V1(V1)/  and created stimuli with 8 types of syllable structure
 and variable prosodic patterns. The results revealed that (1) the Japanese
 perceptual boundary ranges were shorter in duration, but the Finnish
 counterparts were more stable in differentiating between short/long segments;
 (2) the Finnish reached the minimum durational point of long vowels and
 consonants in less time than the Japanese, but the Finnish had wider
 prosodically conditional variations than the Japanese; (3) the word structural
 differences had more effect than the prosodic conditional differences in
 differentiating short segments from long segments in both Finnish and Japanese.
 In Chapter 5, the findings were that (1 ) the Japanese mostly perceived the
 Finnish /CVnC1(C1)V/ as trimoraic words in both listening and transliteration;
 (2) the durations of /n/ were much shorter in the /CVnCCV/ structure than in
 /CVnCV/ in Finnish, and (3) the durational patterns showed similarities in
 /CV-n/N-CV/ for both Finnish and Japanese. In Chapter 6, /h/ was defined as an
 approximant, not as a fricative. The duration of the Japanese /h/ was longer
 than in Finnish, but the durations of /h + V/ were similar in both languages.
 The Finnish /CV-h-CV/ did not show an  isochronic durational pattern.
Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue