LINGUIST List 16.443

Mon Feb 14 2005

Books: History of Ling/Philosophy of Lang: Luhtala

Editor for this issue: Megan Zdrojkowski <meganlinguistlist.org>


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        1.    Paul Peranteau, Grammar and Philosophy in Late Antiquity: Luhtala


Message 1: Grammar and Philosophy in Late Antiquity: Luhtala

Date: 09-Feb-2005
From: Paul Peranteau <paulbenjamins.com>
Subject: Grammar and Philosophy in Late Antiquity: Luhtala


Title: Grammar and Philosophy in Late Antiquity
Subtitle: A study of Priscian's sources
Series Title: Studies in the History of the Language Sciences 107
Published: 2005
Publisher: John Benjamins
                http://www.benjamins.com/

Book URL: http://www.benjamins.com/cgi-bin/t_bookview.cgi?bookid=SiHoLS%20107

Author: Anneli Luhtala, University of Helsinki
Hardback: ISBN: 1588116255 Pages: x,171 Price: U.S. $ 119.00
Hardback: ISBN: 9027245983 Pages: x,171 Price: U.S. $ 99.00
Abstract:

This book examines the various philosophical influences contained in the
ancient description of the noun. According to the traditional view, grammar
adopted its philosophical categories in the second century B.C. and
continued to make use of precisely the same concepts for over six hundred
years, that is, until the time of Priscian (ca. 500). The standard view is
questioned in this study, which investigates in detail the philosophy
contained in Priscian's Institutiones grammaticae. This investigation
reveals a distinctly Platonic element in Priscian's grammar, which has not
been recognised in linguistic historiography. Thus, grammar manifestly
interacted with philosophy in Late Antiquity. This discovery led to the
reconsideration of the origin of all the philosophical categories of the
noun. Since the authenticity of the Techne, which was attributed to
Dionysius Thrax, is now regarded as uncertain, it is possible to speculate
that the semantic categories are derived from Late Antiquity.


Table of contents

Preface ix
1. Introduction 1
2. Philosophical Tradition 12
3. The Alexandrian Grammarians 25
4. Hellenistic Syncretism 30
5. Latin Grammarians 38
6. Priscian 79
7. The Status of the Eight Parts of Speech 129
8. Augustine 138
Conclusions 149
General Conclusions 151
References 156
Index Auctorum 165
Index Rerum 167

Linguistic Field(s): History of Linguistics
                            Philosophy of Language

Written In: English (ENG )

See this book announcement on our website:
http://linguistlist.org/get-book.html?BookID=13413


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