LINGUIST List 16.570

Thu Feb 24 2005

Qs: Epenthesis to Avoid Clash;English Stress Database

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Directory

        1.    Tamas Biro, Epenthesis to Avoid Voice Clash
        2.    Sarah Collie, English Word Stress Database


Message 1: Epenthesis to Avoid Voice Clash

Date: 24-Feb-2005
From: Tamas Biro <birotlet.rug.nl>
Subject: Epenthesis to Avoid Voice Clash


I am looking for languages that prefer inserting an epenthetical vowel to
regressive or progressive voice assimilation in order to solve a clash in
the [voice] feature.

That is: /apda/ --> [apda], and not *[abda] or *[apta]

I know of (modern) Hebrew which (frequently) inserts an epenthetical vowel
in order to avoid homorgenic stop clusters, which is the same story but for
the [place] feature.

Regards,


Tamas Biro

Linguistic Field(s): Phonology
                            Typology

Message 2: English Word Stress Database

Date: 24-Feb-2005
From: Sarah Collie <sejcolliehotmail.com>
Subject: English Word Stress Database


Hi

I was wondering if anyone could help me. I'm a PhD student and I'm looking
for some sort of database (dictionary, corpus - it doesn't matter) of
English word stress patterns; ideally, it would be searchable. Does anyone
know of such a thing?

I would be very grateful for any information on this.

Many thanks

Sarah Collie
University of Edinburgh

Linguistic Field(s): Text/Corpus Linguistics

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