LINGUIST List 16.6

Mon Jan 10 2005

Diss: Phonetics/Psycholing: Mani: 'Prosody, Syntax...'

Editor for this issue: Maria Moreno-Rollins <marialinguistlist.org>


To post to LINGUIST, use our convenient web form at http://linguistlist.org/LL/posttolinguist.html.

Directory


        1.    Nivedita Mani, Prosody, Syntax, and the Lexicon in Parsing Ambiguous Sentences



Message 1: Prosody, Syntax, and the Lexicon in Parsing Ambiguous Sentences

Date: 04-Jan-2005
From: Nivedita Mani <nivedita.manistcatz.ox.ac.uk>
Subject: Prosody, Syntax, and the Lexicon in Parsing Ambiguous Sentences


Institution: University of Oxford 
 Program: Department of Linguistics 
 Dissertation Status: Completed 
 Degree Date: 2005 
 
 Author: Nivedita Mani
 
 Dissertation Title: Prosody, Syntax, and the Lexicon in Parsing Ambiguous
 Sentences 
 
 Linguistic Field(s): Phonetics
                      Psycholinguistics
 
 
 Dissertation Director(s):
 John S Coleman
 
 Dissertation Abstract:
 
 My DPhil tests the early incorporation of prosodic information during on-line
 processing of ambiguous word pairs such as Packing cases. The two alternatives
 are syntactically ambiguous and prosodically distinct. In an on-line,
 cross-modal, response-time task, I tested subjects' responses to appropriate and
 inappropriate verbs following the ambiguous word pairs. Subjects were able to
 make accurate parses of the stimuli. Since the word pairs were syntactically
 ambiguous, this provides evidence in favour of the early incorporation of
 prosodic information in parsing. 
 
 In Experiment 2, I swapped the duration, f0, and amplitude of the noun phrase
 versions with the verb phrase versions. If prosodic information were guiding
 parsing, then swapping the prosody of the alternatives should change subjects'
 parses of the stimuli. I found that subjects interpreted the noun phrases as
 verb phrases and the verb phrases as noun phrases. Only the prosodic content of
 the stimuli could have guided subjects' parsing towards the parses intended by
 the cross-synthesised prosody. This provides additional evidence in favour of
 early prosodic processing. 
 
 Acoustic analysis of the speech suggested that the two forms were marked by
 differences in duration, f0, and amplitude. In Experiment 3, I tested whether
 subjects' ability to differentiate the two forms would be affected by flattening
 the f0 of the word pairs. I found that subjects' ability to disambiguate the
 word pairs was reduced by flattening the f0 of the stimuli. Again, this provides
 evidence in favour of f0 guiding parsing.  
 
 Prior research argues that prosodic information is not perceptually salient in
 the absence of lexical information (Toepel and Alter: 2002). Therefore,
 Experiment 4 tested the parsing of delexicalised versions of the same stimuli. I
 found that subjects continued to make accurate parses of the stimuli. This
 indicates that prosody can guide parsing even without lexical information. 
 
 The results of my four experiments provide strong evidence in favour of the
 early incorporation of prosodic information in parsing. Subjects' parsing was
 tested before the completion of the clauses that the fragments were taken from,
 and before the presentation of the main verb of the sentences. These results
 indicate that prosodic information can influence on-line parsing even in the
 presence of contrary syntactic and spectral preferences and in the absence of
 lexical information. These results have serious implications on models of
 modular and interactive processing. I consider revisions of both these models in
 order to allow the early incorporation of prosodic information in processing.
Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue