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LINGUIST List 17.1352

Tue May 02 2006

Disc: Recursion; Research Standards for Promotion/Tenure

Editor for this issue: Ann Sawyer <sawyerlinguistlist.org>


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Directory
        1.    Oren Sadeh Leicht, Problems with Recent Proposals on Recursion & FLN
        2.    Regina Morin, Reasonable Research Standards


Message 1: Problems with Recent Proposals on Recursion & FLN
Date: 01-May-2006
From: Oren Sadeh Leicht <oren.sadehleichtlet.uu.nl>
Subject: Problems with Recent Proposals on Recursion & FLN


I think saying that the claim of recursion being a single essential trait 
of human language has no content confuses a few points.

Human language, under Chomsky's view (and I guess Hauser and Fitch, too),
is regarded as a mental state, part of the human mind, or I-language.
Recursion is a property of human minds, not necessarily found in (E-)languages.

Thus it is perfectly logical to assert that a language may lack recursion.
It may still be learned (perhaps badly) by recursion which is in the mind
of humans beings, but not in the langauge itself.



Linguistic Field(s): Philosophy of Language




Message 2: Reasonable Research Standards
Date: 26-Apr-2006
From: Regina Morin <rmorintcnj.edu>
Subject: Reasonable Research Standards


My College is currently in the process of writing Disciplinary Standards 
for reappointment, tenure and promotion. I have not been able to find
anywhere in writing what are generally considered reasonable expectations
for research (conferences and publications) for different types of
institutions. Specifically, my questions are:
1. What rate of publication (1 article a year, 2, more? A book?) is
considered reasonable at a Class I research institution, with a 1/1, 1/2,
2/2 teaching load of mostly graduate courses?
2. What rate of publication (1 article a year, 2, more? A book?) is
considered reasonable at a liberal arts college with a 3/3 or 4/4 teaching
load of exclusively undergraduate courses, with advising and other
student-related responsibilities?
3. Do expectations vary widely depending on the particular subfield of
linguistics?
4. What constitutes a normal rejection rate for a first or second tier
linguistics journal?
5. Do publications in refereed selected linguistics conference proceedings
generally carry as much weight as publications in refereed journals?

I would be happy to post a summary of any responses received. Thank you.



Linguistic Field(s): Not Applicable




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