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LINGUIST List 17.1535

Thu May 18 2006

Calls: Pragmatics/USA;Cognitive Science/Australia

Editor for this issue: Kevin Burrows <kevinlinguistlist.org>


As a matter of policy, LINGUIST discourages the use of abbreviations or acronyms in conference announcements unless they are explained in the text. To post to LINGUIST, use our convenient web form at http://linguistlist.org/LL/posttolinguist.html.
Directory
        1.    Craige Roberts, Workshop on Presupposition Accommodation
        2.    Paul Watters, Computational Modelling of Language and Communication Disorders


Message 1: Workshop on Presupposition Accommodation
Date: 16-May-2006
From: Craige Roberts <roberts.21osu.edu>
Subject: Workshop on Presupposition Accommodation



Full Title: Workshop on Presupposition Accommodation

Date: 13-Oct-2006 - 15-Oct-2006
Location: Columbus, OH, USA
Contact Person: Laura Stoia
Meeting Email: < click here to access email >
Web Site: http://pragmatics.osu.edu

Linguistic Field(s): Pragmatics

Call Deadline: 31-Jul-2006

Meeting Description:

The Ohio State University Pragmatics Initiative is hosting a workshop on presupposition accommodation from October 13-15, 2006, with participants from computer science, philosophy, and psychology, as well as linguistic semantics and pragmatics. In addition to commissioned papers and comments, there will be a poster session on Saturday, October 14th.

There will also be a free one-week intensive course on presupposition and accommodation prior to the workshop for graduate students and postdocs; pre-registration is required.

Call for Participation

Workshop on Presupposition Accommodation: Poster Session
Intensive Short Course on Presupposition and Accommodation

At: The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio USA
Course dates: October 8 - 13, 2006
Workshop dates: October 13 - 15, 2006

Deadline for Poster submissions: Submit an abstract by July 31, 2006.
Acceptance will be notified by August 21, 2006.

Course Registration: Register by June 15 to be considered for travel fellowships.
Registration forms available at: http://www.pragmatics.osu.edu

Workshop

Presupposition accommodation is at the intersection of central issues in semantics, pragmatics, psycholinguistics, artificial intelligence and philosophy of language. When an utterance presupposes information which the addressee doesn't already know (e.g. ''I'm on my way to my daughter's graduation'' presupposes that the speaker has a daughter), the addressee may sometimes cooperatively accommodate that information, behaving as though he already knew it to be true, and go on to respond to the assertion (''Congratulations!''). Accommodation has broad implications for the theory of linguistic interpretation because it involves many of the same processes and constraints as in the recognition of contextual effects generally. In addition to its ramifications for theories of meaning in linguistics and for philosophical discussions of the nature of meaning, presupposition accommodation bears on psycholinguistic theories of human linguistic competence, illustrating the interaction between linguistic and non-linguistic (general cognitive) processes. And an appreciation of how it functions is important for the creation of software that aims to systematically interpret or produce language in context.

With support from the Ohio State University Colleges of the Arts and Humanities and the National Science Foundation, we are offering a workshop on presupposition accommodation, with invited participants from across several fields in cognitive science.

Invited participants:
Barbara Abbott, Michigan State University, Linguistics
Dorit Abusch, Cornell University, Linguistics
David Beaver, Stanford University, Linguistics
Anne Bezuidenhuit, University of South Carolina, Philosophy
Gregory Carlson, University of Rochester, Linguistics
Joshua Dever, University of Texas at Austin, Philosophy
Kai Von Fintel, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Linguistics
Lyn Frazier, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Psycholinguistics
Bart Geurts, University of Nijmegen, Philosophy
Anthony Gillies, University of Michigan, Philosophy
Jerry Hobbs, University of Southern California, Computer Science
Laurence R. Horn, Yale University, Linguistics
Staffan Larsson, Gothenburg University, Linguistics
Mats Rooth, Cornell University, Linguistics
Tony Sanford, Glasgow University, Psychology
Mandy Simons, Carnegie Mellon University, Philosophy
Matthew Stone, Rutgers University, Computer Science
Zoltán Szabò, Cornell University, Philosophy
Michael Tanenhaus, University of Rochester, Psychology
Rich Thomason, University of Michigan, Philosophy and Computer Science
Gregory Ward, Northwestern University, Linguistics
Henk Zeevat, University of Amsterdam, Linguistics


Poster Session

We invite submissions for a poster session on the second day of the workshop, Saturday, October 14, 2006. Posters are welcome on any topics relevant for presupposition accommodation, including (but not limited to) theoretical and applied work on:
- the nature of presupposition and of particular presupposition
triggers,
- the role of abductive reasoning in calculating intended meaning
- the character of pragmatic repair.

Work on computational models, both interpretation and generation, and on human acquisition and processing are particularly solicited.

The abstract should be no more than 500 words (not including figures and references) and should include a header which provides contact information for the primary contact author. Send this information to the organizers, at prag-conf(a)ling.ohio-state.edu (replacing (a) in the email address with the 'at' sign).

Deadline for abstract submissions: Midnight (US) EST, July 31, 2006.
Acceptance will be notified by August 21, 2006.
Poster session date: October 14, 2006.

Intensive Short Course on Presupposition and Accommodation:

As an introduction to the material discussed in the Workshop on Presupposition Accommodation, the OSU Pragmatics Initiative is offering a one-week intensive course for graduate students and postdoctoral researchers who wish to improve their understanding of the topic of presupposition accommodation. The course is intended to prepare students to maximally benefit from attendance at the interdisciplinary Workshop on Presupposition Accommodation, and to contribute to scholarship in this field.

The course will provide students with the opportunity to explore presupposition and accommodation in each of the five academic fields represented at the workshop. Discussions and assigned readings will cover both foundational material and current developments, including papers commissioned for the workshop. The course will take place October 8 - 13.

Please see the course website for a list of instructors.

How to Register for Course:

Thanks to support from our sponsors, there is no charge to attend the course. Due to space restrictions, however, participation will be limited. Priority will be given to students with adequate background in a related field. To enroll for the course, complete the registration form that is downloadable from the Workshop website at http://www.pragmatics.osu.edu.

All students in the short course are expected to attend the Workshop on Presupposition Accommodation, taking place immediately after the course on October 13,14 and 15.

Travel Grants for Course:

The National Science Foundation has funded a number of travel fellowships for students and postdoctoral fellows who wish to attend the course. Fellowship students will be reimbursed for their transportation and housing expenses incurred to attend the course and workshop. Fellowship students are expected to attend the course for the entire week and also the Workshop on Presupposition Accommodation. Application materials for travel grants are included in the registration packet available on the website.

Important Dates for Short Course:

June 15, 2006: Registration forms from applicants requesting travel
fellowships must be received by June 15 to receive full
consideration.

July 15, 2006: Notification of acceptance and fellowship status
will be sent to applicants

Sept. 1, 2006: Late registration for the course only
(without travel assistance) will be accepted
through September 1, 2006, subject to space
availability.

Organizers:

* Craige Roberts, OSU Dept. of Linguistics
* Donna Byron, OSU Dept. of Computer Science and Engineering
* Scott Schwenter, OSU Dept. of Spanish and Portuguese

Sponsors:

The course is made possible through the support of the
following organizations:

* The National Science Foundation of the U.S.A.
* The OSU Department of Computer Science and Engineering
* The OSU Department of Linguistics
* The OSU Department of Spanish and Portuguese
* The OSU Federated Colleges of the Arts and Sciences

More information:

For additional information, please go to http://www.pragmatics.osu.edu or contact the organizers at prag-conf(a)ling.ohio-state.edu, by replacing (a) in the email address with the 'at' sign.



Message 2: Computational Modelling of Language and Communication Disorders
Date: 16-May-2006
From: Paul Watters <pwattersics.mq.edu.au>
Subject: Computational Modelling of Language and Communication Disorders



Full Title: Computational Modelling of Language and Communication Disorders

Date: 22-Jul-2006 - 23-Jul-2006
Location: Sydney, NSW, Australia
Contact Person: Paul Watters
Meeting Email: < click here to access email >
Web Site: http://www.comp.mq.edu.au/~pwatters/workshop.html

Linguistic Field(s): Cognitive Science; Neurolinguistics; Psycholinguistics

Call Deadline: 15-Jun-2006

Meeting Description:

The aim of this workshop is to build stronger links between clinical, experimental and computational modelling of disorders where there is a language or communication deficit. Historically, modellers have used limited experimental data to support their work, and clinical work has had limited influence – the goal of the workshop is to bring together workers from different areas to discuss how models might better reflect actual physiology or behaviour, and what predictive validity they may have in these areas. Selected papers from the conference will be published in a volume, and authors will have the opportunity for revision and reflection.

Keynote Speakers
Professor Max Coltheart, Macquarie Centre for Cognitive Sciences (MACCS), Macquarie University
Professor David Plaut, Centre for the Neural Basis of Cognition (CNBC), Carnegie Mellon University

Goal
The aim of this workshop is to build stronger links between clinical, experimental and computational modelling of disorders where there is a language or communication deficit. Historically, modellers have used limited experimental data to support their work, and clinical work has had limited influence - the goal of the workshop is to bring together workers from different areas to discuss how models might better reflect actual physiology or behaviour, and what predictive validity they may have in these areas. Selected papers from the conference will be published in a volume, and authors will have the opportunity for revision and reflection.

Scope
Computational modeling of language and communication disorders is a promising field. There have been several successes, such as the dual-route cascade model of word recognition (Coltheart et al. 1993), which have influenced experimental and clinical work in dyslexia. However, while newer connectionist models have used sophisticated statistical and mathematical techniques in an attempt to replicate linguistic and cognitive phenomena, it would be fair to say that the influence on experimentation has been limited, and clinical outcomes have been minimal. The question that we wish to address in the workshop is why have modern computational models largely failed to live up to their promise with respect to clinical practice and experimentation in language and communication disorders? In order to answer this question, we will invite psychologists, neuroscientists, linguists, speech pathologists and computer scientists to present their disciplinary perspectives on the requirements and utilisation of computational models, across a wide range of language and communication disorders. We hope to elucidate a clear set of principles for computational modeling that will better direct the work of modelers, which will then enhance experimental and clinical practice.

Significance
Human communication - whether verbal or non-verbal - is a fundamental skill that, when disordered, makes social integration very difficult, and impairs quality of life and function for sufferers of various disorders. Computational models allow us to test various hypotheses on the desktop rather than having to use human participants. However, these models are only useful for interpreting experimental data and in guiding clinical therapy if they have both predictive and explanatory validity. Many arguments have been made in the literature concerning the validity of these models from neural and psychological perspectives. The question is - what do clinical and experimental disciplines need to contribute to develop successful computational models, and most importantly, how can these results be communicated to and be used by experimenters and clinicians. It seems difficult to imagine models being useful if these fundamental issues are not addressed

Format
The workshop will comprise a single stream of half-hour talks held over two days, with two keynote addresses, and concluding with a panel discussion. The panel will attempt to answer the question - what do clinical and experimental disciplines need to contribute to develop successful computational models, and most importantly, how can these results be communicated to and be used by experimenters and clinicians. A poster session for postgraduate students will also be hosted.

Presentations
Presentations may be informal, as long as they are insightful and challenging. Robust discussion between participants and presenters is anticipated. A limit of 30 academic attendees will be imposed. Please submit an extended abstract to Paul Watters pwattersics.mq.edu.au by the 15th June, with the subject ''Workshop Abstract''.

An important part of the workshop will be a poster session for postgraduate research students, providing them with access to leading clinicians, experimenters and modellers who will positively influence their research. Please submit an extended abstract to Paul Watters pwattersics.mq.edu.au by the 15th June, with the subject ''Poster Abstract''.

Funding
This workshop is funded by the ARC Human Communication Sciences Network (HCSNet), and attendance is free. You will be notified if you have been selected for funding in either of the following categories, and receipts must be provided before reimbursement can be made.

Academics: 15 attendees who live outside the Sydney area will have their travel expenses reimbursed to a maximum of $500.

Postgraduates: 10 postgraduate attendees who live outside the Sydney area will have their travel expenses reimbursed to a maximum of $500.

Organising Committee
Helen Chenery (University of Queensland), Lee Flax (Macquarie University), Jennifer Gurd (University of Oxford), Frances Martin (University of Tasmania), Paul Watters (Macquarie University)

Questions? Contact Dr. Paul Watters on (02) 9850 9525 or pwattersics.mq.edu.au



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