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LINGUIST List 17.1585

Wed May 24 2006

Calls: Syntax/Germany;Computational Ling/USA

Editor for this issue: Kevin Burrows <kevinlinguistlist.org>


As a matter of policy, LINGUIST discourages the use of abbreviations or acronyms in conference announcements unless they are explained in the text. To post to LINGUIST, use our convenient web form at http://linguistlist.org/LL/posttolinguist.html.
Directory
        1.    Anja Wanner, Syntactic Variation and Emerging Genres - Section of the Annual Meeting of the German Linguistics Society
        2.    Elias Ponvert, Texas Linguistics Society 10


Message 1: Syntactic Variation and Emerging Genres - Section of the Annual Meeting of the German Linguistics Society
Date: 22-May-2006
From: Anja Wanner <awannerwisc.edu>
Subject: Syntactic Variation and Emerging Genres - Section of the Annual Meeting of the German Linguistics Society


Full Title: Syntactic Variation and Emerging Genres - Section of the Annual
Meeting of the German Linguistics Society
Short Title: DGfS

Date: 28-Feb-2007 - 02-Mar-2007
Location: Siegen, Germany
Contact Person: Anja Wanner
Meeting Email: awannerwisc.edu
Web Site: http://mendota.english.wisc.edu/~awanner/dgfs2007.htm

Linguistic Field(s): Discourse Analysis; Syntax; Text/Corpus Linguistics

Call Deadline: 31-Jul-2006

Meeting Description:

This workshop, co-organized by Heidrun Dorgeloh (Heinrich-Heine-University
Duesseldorf) and Anja Wanner (University of Wisconsin-Madison), is an integral
part of the Annual Meeting of the German Linguistics Society (DGfS). It will
explore the question of how syntactic variation is linked to the context of
genre and, more specifically, how such variation can be studied with view to
contexts of constantly changing and emerging genres.

This workshop, co-organized by Heidrun Dorgeloh (Heinrich-Heine-University
Duesseldorf) and Anja Wanner (University of Wisconsin-Madison), is an integral
part of the Annual Meeting of the German Linguistics Society (DGfS). The
conference includes plenary talks and parallel thematic workshops.

Modern genre theory emphasizes the importance of genres as typified utterances
that share a set of communicative purposes, emerging and developing through
repeated use in similar situations. For some registers a trend towards
''genrefication'' has been observed. Cases in point are the standardization of
review processes and other performance assessments in academic and
administrative discourse, or the emergence of new patterns of style in
newspaper language.

We would like to explore in this workshop the question of how syntactic
variation is linked to the context of genre and, more specifically, how such
variation can be studied with view to contexts of constantly changing and
emerging genres. How and when do new genres emerge, and how does syntactic
variation reflect or contribute to that process?

Studies that fall into the scope of this proposal include:
- sociolinguistic studies of different registers
- corpus studies of emerging genres or constructions
- studies focusing on the link between syntax and pragmatics

We primarily invite empirical work, but there should also be space for
discussing more theoretical issues, in particular of how to incorporate
variation according to genre into theories of grammar. We hope to bring together
insights from different approaches to syntactic variation (corpus linguistics,
construction grammar, historical and synchronic pragmatics, genre theory),
unified by the connection they make between linguistic form and communicative
purpose.

One-page abstracts (max. 500 words) should be sent by e-mail to the coordinators
by July 15, 2006 (as attachment in .doc or .pdf format). Contributors should
indicate their name, affiliation, e-mail address under which they can be
contacted over the summer, and their DGfS membership status. Please send your
abstract to both coordinators at the same time
(dorgelohphil-fak.uni-duesseldorf.de and awannerwisc.edu).

For more information and for updates please visit the workshop website:
http://mendota.english.wisc.edu/~awanner/dgfs2007.htm
Message 2: Texas Linguistics Society 10
Date: 22-May-2006
From: Elias Ponvert <efputs.cc.utexas.edu>
Subject: Texas Linguistics Society 10



Full Title: Texas Linguistics Society 10
Short Title: TLSX

Date: 03-Nov-2006 - 05-Nov-2006
Location: Austin, Texas, USA
Contact Person: Elias Ponvert
Meeting Email: tlsuts.cc.utexas.edu
Web Site: http://uts.cc.utexas.edu/~tls/2006tls

Linguistic Field(s): Computational Linguistics; Language Description

Call Deadline: 01-Aug-2006

Meeting Description:

Computational Linguistics for Less-Studied Languages

DESCRIPTION

The past decade has seen great developments at the intersection of
computational linguistics and language documentation, particularly in the focus
areas of speech and video recording and transcription, best practices for data
collection and archiving, and ontology development. TLSX aims to highlight the
application of techniques from computational linguistics to the management and
analysis of language data as well as to less-studied languages or less-studied
varieties of well-studied languages.

The goal of TLSX is to further the state of computational linguistics for
less-studied languages by bringing together researchers working at this
frontier and providing a forum for the presentation of original research. We
anticipate work both from documentary and descriptive linguists interested in
improving technologies for linguistic analysis and from computational linguists
interested in theoretical issues such as the application of data-driven natural
language processing (NLP) techniques to languages for which there exists
relatively little digitally-available data.

To that end, we invite submissions in the areas of computational analysis and
management of linguistic data from less-studied languages. We also welcome
submissions relating to the development of computational tools to facilitate
such analysis. Possible topics include (but are not limited to):
- machine learning in scarce data situations
- multilingual grammar and lexicon development
- cross-linguistic applicability of NLP methods
- active learning
- transfer learning
- bootstrapping semi-automated annotation
- challenges posed by particular languages or phenomena to current NLP methods

INVITED SPEAKERS

Jason Baldridge, University of Texas at Austin
Emily Bender, University of Washington
Katrin Erk, University of Texas at Austin
Mark Liberman, University of Pennsylvania
Raymond Mooney, University of Texas at Austin

SUBMISSIONS due August 1, 2006

Submitted papers must be no longer than 10 pages and are expected to follow
CSLI formatting requirements. For LaTeX and Word templates and further details,
see conference website.

Notification: September 1, 2006

Meeting URL
http://uts.cc.utexas.edu/~tls/2006tls

Email contact
tlsuts.cc.utexas.edu

ORGANIZING COMMITTEE

Stephen Hilderbrand, Heeyoung Lyu, Alexis Palmer, Elias Ponvert
(all of UT Austin)

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