* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
LINGUIST List logo Eastern Michigan University Wayne State University *
* People & Organizations * Jobs * Calls & Conferences * Publications * Language Resources * Text & Computer Tools * Teaching & Learning * Mailing Lists * Search *
* *
LINGUIST List 17.159

Tue Jan 17 2006

Diss: Sociolinguistics: Stoesslein: 'Die Einstellung...'

Editor for this issue: Meredith Valant <meredithlinguistlist.org>


To post to LINGUIST, use our convenient web form at http://linguistlist.org/LL/posttolinguist.html.
Directory
        1.    Hartmut Stoesslein, Die Einstellung linguistischer Laien der ersten, zweiten und dritten Latino-Generation beim spanisch-englischen Sprachkontakt in den Vereinigten Staaten von Amerika


Message 1: Die Einstellung linguistischer Laien der ersten, zweiten und dritten Latino-Generation beim spanisch-englischen Sprachkontakt in den Vereinigten Staaten von Amerika
Date: 16-Jan-2006
From: Hartmut Stoesslein <hartmut.stoessleinuni-bayreuth.de>
Subject: Die Einstellung linguistischer Laien der ersten, zweiten und dritten Latino-Generation beim spanisch-englischen Sprachkontakt in den Vereinigten Staaten von Amerika


Institution: University of Bamberg
Program: Linguistics Program
Dissertation Status: Completed
Degree Date: 2005

Author: Hartmut Erland Stoesslein

Dissertation Title: Die Einstellung linguistischer Laien der ersten, zweiten und dritten Latino-Generation beim spanisch-englischen Sprachkontakt in den Vereinigten Staaten von Amerika

Dissertation URL: http://www.opus-bayern.de/uni-bamberg/volltexte/2005/74/

Linguistic Field(s): Sociolinguistics

Subject Language(s): German, Standard (deu)

Dissertation Director:
Martin Haase
Gabriele Knappe
Monika Sokol

Dissertation Abstract:

The source of investigation and the data for this study on language
attitude were drawn from the information provided by US-Latinos compiled in
an extensive tripartite corpus. It consists of 823 statements made in
internet fora (asynchrone computer-mediated communication [CMC]). Compared
to traditional investigations in the field of language attitude this new
approach to obtain information on language attitude and language use
facilitates a reduction or even an exclusion of the observer's paradox
which frequently militates against obtaining authentic statements in the
act of observation and interview contexts. Using a primarily
sociolinguistic approach, this investigation analyses and describes the
attitudes of US-Latinos in the language contact situations of US-English
and (varieties of) American Spanish spoken in the United States. The
language contact product resulting from a "mixture" (Sprachmischung) of the
lexicon and the language structure of both Spanish and English is
Spanglish. It is often difficult to describe Spanglish, since it is
unstable, transitional, and frequently stigmatized. Both American Spanish
and Spanglish (as well as their numerous varieties) are generally the
linguistic, cultural and identity basis of the United States' heterogeneous
and largest ethnic minority generally known as Latinos, Hispanics,
Hispanos, and "Hyphenated-Americans" (e.g.: Hispanic-Americans,
Mexican-Americans, Domincan-Americans). Persons of Mexican origin solely
are called Chicanos, Hispanics, Hispanic-Americans, Hispanos, Latinos,
Mexican Americans, Mexicanos. These determinations can be used in a
positive and negative sense and strongly depend on the contexts and domains
in which they are used. Language, culture and identity in their interactive
relations and dependences are dealt with and placed in relation to the
mainstream culture and language. How do Latinos cope with the fact that
they frequently can't speak Spanish anymore (language displacement,
language shift, three generation model)? In this investigation language
conflict is not merely seen as a societal problem but also analysed in its
consequences for the individual Latino (identity problems/ crisis).
Furthermore, problems resulting from bilingualism and bilinguality,
language choice in bilingual settings or domains, the attitude towards
Spanglish, language loyalty of Latinos towards their language of origin,
their attitude towards the mainstream language, language pressure, the role
and importance of language domains, intersentential code-switching /
intrasentential code-mixing, borrowing / transferences und language shift
(Spanish-Spanglish-English), the dichotomy and results of parental language
decisions as well as family language planning (assimilation and
anglicanization into the mainstream culture or language maintenance in the
form of adaptation or language retention) are being discussed.





Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue




Please report any bad links or misclassified data

LINGUIST Homepage | Read LINGUIST | Contact us

NSF Logo

While the LINGUIST List makes every effort to ensure the linguistic relevance of sites listed
on its pages, it cannot vouch for their contents.