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LINGUIST List 17.1937

Mon Jul 03 2006

Calls: Applied Ling/Netherlands;General Ling/Estonia

Editor for this issue: Dan Parker <danlinguistlist.org>


As a matter of policy, LINGUIST discourages the use of abbreviations or acronyms in conference announcements unless they are explained in the text. To post to LINGUIST, use our convenient web form at http://linguistlist.org/LL/posttolinguist.html.
Directory
        1.    Marjolein Deunk, Applied Linguistics: A New Generation
        2.    daniele monticelli, Aspect in Languages and Theories: Similarities and Differences


Message 1: Applied Linguistics: A New Generation
Date: 26-Jun-2006
From: Marjolein Deunk <m.i.deunkrug.nl>
Subject: Applied Linguistics: A New Generation



Full Title: Applied Linguistics: A New Generation

Date: 24-Jan-2007 - 26-Jan-2007
Location: Groningen, Netherlands
Contact Person: Marjolein Deunk
Meeting Email: < click here to access email >
Web Site: http://www.anela.nl/juniorresearchmeeting

Linguistic Field(s): Applied Linguistics

Call Deadline: 01-Sep-2006

Meeting Description:

Anéla and GAL are pleased to announce:

Applied Linguistics: A New Generation
International Research Meeting for Junior Applied Linguists

January 24-26, 2007; University of Groningen, the Netherlands
www.anela.nl/juniorresearchmeeting

Anéla and GAL are pleased to announce:

Applied Linguistics: A New Generation
International Research Meeting for Junior Applied Linguists

January 24-26, 2007; University of Groningen, the Netherlands
www.anela.nl/juniorresearchmeeting

2nd CALL FOR PAPERS
(Including announcement of keynote speakers and extended deadline)

For more than 10 years, Anéla, the Dutch affiliate of AILA, has been organizing the so called 'junior days' to which beginning researchers, PhD students, and graduate students are invited to present their work in an informal and supportive setting. These meetings have been very successful over the years, providing beginning researchers the opportunity to present their work on an academic forum and to receive valuable feedback.

Stimulated by suggestions from the AILA International Committee, Anéla and GAL, the German affiliate, have now planned to organize a joint International Research Meeting for Junior Applied Linguists, aiming at an international exchange of ideas and a stimulation of contacts between European affiliates of AILA. Interaction with and feedback from both junior and senior researchers is highly emphasized.

We invite junior researchers to submit abstracts for thirty-minute oral presentations and/or poster presentations describing original work addressing topics from one of the following fields of applied linguistics:

-Language development
-Language in the community
-Language in education
-Language in professional settings

Possible topics range from first and second language acquisition, literacy development and language disorders to language variation and linguistic discrimination, multilingualism and intercultural communication and from language conflict, language policy and language planning to language and communication in politics and by audiovisual- and virtual means.

We are happy to announce our keynote speakers:

Jan Hulstijn
Department of Second Language Acquisition, University of Amsterdam

Eva-Maria Jakobs
Institut für Sprach- und Kommunikationswissenschaft, RWTH Aachen University

Language choice for abstracts and presentations is free. Abstracts can be submitted through the website: www.anela.nl/juniorresearchmeeting.

For further information on the conference, please visit the website or contact the local organizers at the following address: juniorresearchmeetinganela.nl

Program Committee:
Kees de Bot (Groningen)
Herman Cölfen (Essen)
Jan Engberg (Aarhus)
Carmen Spiegel (Essen)
Jan ten Thije (Utrecht)
Eija Ventola (Helsinki)

Local Organizers:
Sible Andringa (Groningen)
Kees de Bot (Groningen)
Marjolein Deunk (Groningen)
Rasmus Steinkrauss (Groningen)

Important Dates:
Submission deadline: September 1, 2006
Notification of authors: End of September 2006
Registration deadline: January 1, 2007
Conference: January 24-26, 2007



Message 2: Aspect in Languages and Theories: Similarities and Differences
Date: 26-Jun-2006
From: daniele monticelli <monticellihot.ee>
Subject: Aspect in Languages and Theories: Similarities and Differences



Full Title: Aspect in Languages and Theories: Similarities and Differences

Date: 17-Nov-2006 - 18-Nov-2006
Location: Tartu, Estonia
Contact Person: Daniele Monticelli
Meeting Email: < click here to access email >
Web Site: http://www.fl.ut.ee/aspektikonverents

Linguistic Field(s): General Linguistics

Call Deadline: 15-Sep-2006

Meeting Description:

The conference will approach the subject of aspectuality from three different perspectives:

Contrastive approach: Does contrastive analysis identify functional equivalencies between different ways in which aspect shows itself in different languages? What remains and what changes? Or can aspectual phenomena rather be explained in terms used for general language-specific qualities?

The general theoretical framework: The first problem here has to do with the definition of aspect. If it was to be linked with particular forms in which it manifested itself, the theory would immediately become language-specific. In broader semantic definitions, linguists often use concepts as ‘primitives’ which call for explanation. What is a situation or an action or a process? A related problem has to do with mixing, distinguishing and relating the concepts of aspect and Aktionsart in theory.

Aspect and definiteness: This could be the most experimental section of the conference. So far, aspect and definiteness have been distinguished as qualities of a verb and a noun respectively, but one could ask whether a more general mechanism of definition does not come up in those and how their influence defines the type of situation. What are the possible combinations of aspect and definiteness?


''ASPECT IN LANGUAGES AND THEORIES: SIMILARITIES AND DIFFERENCES''

International conference at the University of Tartu
17 - 18 November 2006

Call for papers

The idea for this conference grew out of a series of seminars which took place as part of a target-financed project on contrastive linguistics in the philosophy department of the University of Tartu in 2005-2006. Researchers of different languages and general linguists took part in the seminars. The main emphasis was on comparing the forms in which aspect manifests itself in different languages: Slavonic, Germanic, Romance and Fenno-Ugric languages as well as Ancient Greek and Latin were covered in presentations and discussions. The contrastive approach also brought about the general question of whether aspect theory and its concepts can be universal or whether they are always related to explaining the phenomena of one language or language group. As became obvious in the seminars, in many languages it is difficult to distinguish aspect from other categories, for example the category of tense in Romance languages and definiteness in Estonian. Aspectual meaning often forms secondarily or 'epi-phenomenally' as a result of the combined influence of some other factors or categories and the means of expression of aspect often have other functions.

Papers submitted for the conference could approach the subject of aspectuality from three different perspectives:

1) Contrastive approach: Aspect theory was first developed for Slavonic languages, then expanded to other language groups. Thus aspect was thought of (e.g. by Bondarko 1971, Comrie 1976 and Dahl 1985) as a universal semantic category which appears in different languages on different levels (lexical, morphological, syntactical). Will contrastive analysis identify such functional equivalencies between different ways in which aspect shows itself in different languages? What remains and what changes? Or can aspectual phenomena rather be explained in terms used for general language-specific qualities?
Some of the conference papers could take translation as their subject of analysis (for example Romance-Estonian or Estonian-Romance, Estonian-Russian or Russian Estonian, Russian-Romance or Romance-Russian) discussing to what extent the transition in terms of expressing aspect when moving from one language to another preserves, loses or shifts the original meaning.

2) The general theoretical framework. This question is directly related to the need to apply the theory of aspect to different languages and to develop concepts which would help in the comparison of different languages to one another. The first problem here has to do with the definition of aspect. If it was to be linked with particular forms in which it manifested itself, the theory would immediately become language-specific. In broader semantic definitions, linguists often use concepts as 'primitives' which call for explanation. What is a situation or an action or a process? How should definiteness or indefiniteness be understood? A related problem has to do with mixing, distinguishing and relating the concepts of aspect and Aktionsart in theory. Emphasizing one concept or the other seems on the one hand to be connected with the qualities of the language analysed. On the other hand, theorists often propose universal typologies (for example the fundamental work of Vendler 1967).

3) Aspect and definiteness. This could be the most experimental section of the conference. The idea of a possible relationship between aspect and definiteness originally came about in seminars concerned with analysing the forms in which aspect manifests itself in Estonian. Aspect in Estonian appears primarily at the syntactic level and in the verb phrase in the case of transitive verbs the function of identifying aspect is carried by the object, which either defines activity (a definite or full object) or leaves it undefined (the indefinite or partitive object). So far, aspect and definiteness have been distinguished as qualities of a verb and a noun respectively, but one could ask whether a more general mechanism of definition does not come up in those and how their influence defines the type of situation. What are the possible combinations of aspect and definiteness? While in the case of Estonian the effect is obvious, how does this work in languages in which aspect manifests itself lexico-grammatically (Slavonic languages) or morphologically (Romance languages)?

A collected volume of papers from the conference will be published.

Organisers:
The French language section of the Department of Germanic and Romance Philology of the University of Tartu with the support of target-financed topic number SF0182568s03 and the Tallinn French Cultural Centre.

Organising team:
Helle Metslang, Stefano Montes, Daniele Monticelli, Jean Pascal Ollivry, Renate Pajusalu, Heete Sahkai, Anu Treikelder

Practical information:
DUE DATE FOR ABSTRACTS: 15 September 2006
(Please send us your name, place of work/educational institution, e-mail address)
Length of abstracts: 250-300 words
Working languages of the conference: Estonian, French, English
A service of translation (French-Estonian and Estonian-French) will work during the conference
Length of presentations: 20 minutes.

Send abstracts or ask for more information:
Daniele Monticelli (danielehi.ee) and Anu Treikelder (anu.treikelderut.ee)
Web page: http://www.fl.ut.ee/aspektikonverents



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