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LINGUIST List 17.2887

Wed Oct 04 2006

Calls: Cognitive Science, Phonology/USA; General Ling/USA

Editor for this issue: Dan Parker <danlinguistlist.org>


As a matter of policy, LINGUIST discourages the use of abbreviations or acronyms in conference announcements unless they are explained in the text. To post to LINGUIST, use our convenient web form at http://linguistlist.org/LL/posttolinguist.html.
Directory
        1.    Eric Raimy, Precedence Relationships in Phonological Grammar
        2.    Patricia Donaher, Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association


Message 1: Precedence Relationships in Phonological Grammar
Date: 02-Oct-2006
From: Eric Raimy <raimywisc.edu>
Subject: Precedence Relationships in Phonological Grammar


Full Title: Precedence Relationships in Phonological Grammar

Date: 25-Jan-2007 - 26-Jan-2007
Location: New York, New York, USA
Contact Person: Chuck Cairns
Meeting Email: ccairnscunyphonologyforum.net
Web Site: http://www.cunyphonologyforum.net

Linguistic Field(s): Cognitive Science; Phonology

Call Deadline: 10-Nov-2006

Meeting Description:

Precedence Relationships in Phonological Grammar

The CUNY Phonology Forum presents a conference focused on
investigating all aspects of precedence (temporal or sequential) relationships
in phonology. The conference will bring together subdivisions of cognitive
science such as formal linguistics, language acquisition, neurolinguistics,
philosophy, psychology, etc. to create a broad survey of the issues,
successes and approaches in understanding the nature of precedence in
phonology. (We use the terms "precedence," "temporal" and "sequential"
interchangeably below to keep the area of interest broad.)

Invited Speakers: (This is a preliminary list)

-Elizabeth Hume, Ohio State University
-William Idsardi, University of Maryland
-Charles Reiss, Concordia University

Important Dates and Information:

November 10, 2006: deadline for submission of abstracts
December 1, 2006: notification of acceptance
January 25/26, 2007: Precedence relationships in phonological grammar
conference

Location:

Graduate Center, City University of New York, 365 Fifth Avenue, New York
City, New York 10016-4309.

Registration and Update Information:

Check this website for registration and updates:
http://www.cunyphonologyforum.net/.

Organizers: Chuck Cairns, CUNY, and Eric Raimy University of Wisconsin

The CUNY Phonology Forum invites 20 minute papers on any aspect of
precedence (temporal or sequential) relationships in phonology for a
conference to be held at the City University of New York, Jan 25/26, 2007.
We invite papers from any subdivision of cognitive science such as formal
linguistics, language acquisition, neurolinguistics, philosophy, psychology,
etc. Scholars with ideas broadly within the penumbra of the suggested
topics listed below are heartily encouraged to make a submission. (We use
the terms ''precedence'' ''temporal'' and ''sequential'' interchangeably below
to keep the area of interest broad.)

- What is unique to temporal (or sequential) representation in
phonology? What is derivable from general cognitive functions?

- Does temporal representation change over the course of language
acquisition (e.g. from syllable representations to segment
representations)?

- Where are temporal relations encoded in the phonology? On each
featural tier? Strictly on the X-tier? Or are they all derivable from
syllabic or other prosodic structure?

- What do 'non-concatenative morphology' (e.g. reduplication,
infixation, root and template morphology) and ludlings tell us about
the existence and manipulation of ordering relationships in phonology?

- Do progressive and regressive operations (either local or long
distance) in phonology yield insights into sequential order of
phonological segments?

- How can sequential information be manipulated and/or referred to in
phonology? E.g., what are the underlying formal mechanisms involved in
metathesis, linearity, contiguity, etc.?

- How does the phonological representation of ordering information get
translated into phonetic information?

Abstracts should consist of a one page description of the paper (12pt font)
with a second page for references, data and/or illustrations. Abstracts
should be emailed as an attachment (PDF format) to
ccairnscunyphonologyforum.net no later than midnight, November 10,
2006. The subject line should be ''precedence conference.'' Authors should
include title of the paper, name of the author(s) and affiliation in the body of
the email.

Important Dates and Information:

November 10, 2006 deadline for submission of abstracts
December 1, 2006 notification of acceptance
January 25/26 Precedence relationships in phonological grammar
conference

Location:

Graduate Center, City University of New York, 365 Fifth Avenue, New York
City, New York 10016-4309.

Registration and Updated Information:

Check this website for registration and updates:
http://www.cunyphonologyforum.net/.

Organizers: Chuck Cairns, CUNY, and Eric Raimy University of Wisconsin
Message 2: Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association
Date: 02-Oct-2006
From: Patricia Donaher <donahermissouriwestern.edu>
Subject: Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association



Full Title: Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association
Short Title: PCA/ACA

Date: 04-Apr-2007 - 07-Apr-2007
Location: Boston, MA, USA
Contact Person: Patricia Donaher
Meeting Email: donahermissouriwestern.edu
Web Site: http://www.popularculture.org

Linguistic Field(s): General Linguistics

Call Deadline: 01-Nov-2006

Meeting Description:

Call for papers on language attitudes and popular linguistics for 2007 Popular
Culture Association/American Culture Association Conference in Boston, MA, April
4-7.

Call for Papers! - Language Attitudes and Popular Linguistics Area
2007 Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association Conference
Boston Marriott Copley Place, Boston, Massachusetts - April 4-7, 2007

The Language Attitudes and Popular Linguistics Area of the Popular Culture
Association is seeking presentations on any language-related popular culture
topic, such as:
- language and advertising or other media;
- professional, corporate, or other industry-related language;
- dialect, code-switching, or historical studies of language and language
attitudes;
- animal or extraterrestrial communication;
- language and education, including pedagogical approaches;
- gendered communication or other sociolinguistic topics;
- language and censorship;
- first and second language acquisition;
- any topic that relates to popular linguistics or language attitudes.

See the end of this message for a rundown on past paper topics.

Paper length is 15 to 20 minutes, with four presenters per 90 minute session.

Send your presentation title and abstract (of up to 200 words), along with your
name, position/title, school/work address, phone number, and email address to me
at donahermissouriwestern.edu by November 1, 2006. For more information, feel
free to contact me by phone or email.

Patricia Donaher, Ph.D.
Area Chair, Language Attitudes and Popular Linguistics
Assistant Professor of English
Dept of English
Missouri Western State University
4525 Downs Drive
St. Joseph, MO 64507
816-271-5964
donahermissouriwestern.edu

For further information about the conference, please visit the PCA/ACA website
at http://www.popularculture.org. Topics in preceding years included the following:
- language in the television series Firefly;
- linguistic alternations in the lyrics of Hank Williams, Sr.;
- language attitudes in female pop vocals;
- use of English and French in point of purchase advertising;
- ''with'' constructions in the Minnesota English dialect;
- language attitudes in the New South;
- the dynamics of verbal aggression;
- male bonding through language;
- dumb blonde jokes;
- the language of the French rap group IAM;
- language attitudes in cartoons;
- effects of instant messaging on student writing;
- language on The Jerry Springer Show;
- the language of technological crises;
- a linguistic analysis of the Kerry and Bush acceptance speeches;
- translation and diplomacy during the American Revolution;
- the language of financial statements.

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