* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
LINGUIST List logo Eastern Michigan University Wayne State University *
* People & Organizations * Jobs * Calls & Conferences * Publications * Language Resources * Text & Computer Tools * Teaching & Learning * Mailing Lists * Search *
* *
LINGUIST List 17.3028

Mon Oct 16 2006

Calls: Phonology, Pragmatics/Sweden; Sociolinguistics/USA

Editor for this issue: Dan Parker <danlinguistlist.org>


As a matter of policy, LINGUIST discourages the use of abbreviations or acronyms in conference announcements unless they are explained in the text. To post to LINGUIST, use our convenient web form at http://linguistlist.org/LL/posttolinguist.html.
Directory
        1.    Nicole Dehe, Prosody and Pragmatics in Spoken Language corpora
        2.    Richard Ashley, International Society for Gesture Studies Conference 2007: Integrating Gestures


Message 1: Prosody and Pragmatics in Spoken Language corpora
Date: 16-Oct-2006
From: Nicole Dehe <ndehezedat.fu-berlin.de>
Subject: Prosody and Pragmatics in Spoken Language corpora



Full Title: Prosody and Pragmatics in Spoken Language corpora

Date: 08-Jul-2007 - 13-Jul-2007
Location: Goeteborg, Sweden
Contact Person: Nicole Dehe
Meeting Email: < click here to access email >
Web Site: http://userpage.fu-berlin.de/~ndehe/IPrA2007/hauptseite.html

Linguistic Field(s): Phonology; Pragmatics

Call Deadline: 10-Nov-2007

Meeting Description:

This panel will focus on the interface between prosody and pragmatics. Particular emphasis will be placed on prosodic phrasing and its relevance for pragmatics. We aim to focus on empirical studies of prosodic features in natural spoken language.

Panel organisers:

Dagmar Barth-Weingarten (Universitaet Potsdam; dbarthuni-potsdam.de)
Nicole Dehé (Freie Universitaet Berlin; ndehezedat.fu-berlin.de)
Anne Wichmann (University of Central Lancashire; awichmannuclan.ac.uk)

Prosody is an integral part of spoken language in use, and in various research areas such as Conversation Analysis, Interactional Linguistics, the study of semantic change and applications in speech technology, it has been convincingly shown to contribute to meaning not only on the interpersonal but also on the referential and the textual language levels (cf., e.g., Couper-Kuhlen & Selting 1996, 2001; Culpeper et al 2003, Couper-Kuhlen & Ford 2004, Wichmann & Blakemore 2006).

Yet, except for work on focusing strategies, prosody has so far not figured prominently in pragmatic research, even though information structuring, interaction management and the expression of affect and attitude among others lie at the heart of pragmatics and prosody alike.

Corpus linguistics, too, has paid increasing attention to the investigation of large corpora of spoken language, with increasing awareness that the actual sound files should be the basis of investigation (Lancaster/IBM-corpus, ICE-GB, DCPSE). However, while a corpus-based description of (the differences between) spoken and written language has entered grammar writing (e.g., Biber et al 1999), pragmatic aspects of the use of prosody in spoken language corpora still await further exploration. This includes the use of the variable prosodic components pitch, loudness, tempo and voice quality as well as prosodic phrasing.

Embarking on any such project the first difficulty encountered is that of appropriately notating the flow of speech and thus identifying its smaller units. The nature of these units and the applicability of those already described to natural spoken language is still widely discussed (cf. Chafe 1994, Ladd 1996, Mindt 2001). Among the questions to be dealt with are:

- What kinds of prosodic units can be found in natural spoken language (paratone, declination unit, intonation unit, prosodic phrase, etc)?
- What is their relevance for the participants?
- How are they signaled in actual discourse (boundary cues, obligatory features)?
- What is their pragmatic value, e.g. in terms of securing the floor (prosodic projection), signaling actions (prosodic (dis-)integration) and emphatic uses of prosodic phrasing?
- To what extent do they correlate with other units (syntax-prosody, action-prosody interfaces)?
- What is their role in signaling changes in these correlations, as e.g. with grammaticalisation?

Hence, in this panel we would like to particularly encourage contributions on the nature and role of prosodic units from a pragmatic point of view. In addition, papers related to all aspects of prosody in spoken language and its relevance for pragmatics are welcome.

Presentations will be 20 minutes long, followed by a 10-minute question period. The conference language will be English.

Submission of abstracts: Abstracts should be in English and should not exceed 500 words. The body of the abstract includes a well-formulated research question, a good description of the types of data used (if empirical work will be presented), the approach employed and the findings. Work presented should be completed or clearly in progress.

All abstracts must be submitted electronically at the IPrA conference website. This requires the presenter to be an IPrA member. Membership can be arranged at the IPrA website (please allow 24 hours for the registration process to be completed.) In addition, please send your abstract via email to all three panel organisers.

The IPrA secretariat will then decide about acceptance of the individual proposals.

Important dates:
Deadline for abstract submission: 10 November 2006 (adapted)
Notification of acceptance: 15 December 2006
IPrA conference in Göteborg: 8-13 July 2007



Message 2: International Society for Gesture Studies Conference 2007: Integrating Gestures
Date: 13-Oct-2006
From: Richard Ashley <r-ashleynorthwestern.edu>
Subject: International Society for Gesture Studies Conference 2007: Integrating Gestures



Full Title: International Society for Gesture Studies Conference 2007: Integrating Gestures
Short Title: ISGS 2007

Date: 18-Jun-2007 - 21-Jun-2007
Location: Evanston, IL, USA
Contact Person: Richard Ashley
Meeting Email: < click here to access email >
Web Site: http://www.gesturestudies.com

Linguistic Field(s): Sociolinguistics

Call Deadline: 25-Nov-2006

Meeting Description:

The International Society for Gesture Studies announces its third
Conference, 'Integrating Gestures,' to be held June 18-21, 2007, at
Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois (just north of Chicago).
Gesture is ubiquitous in human communication, from the earliest
developmental stages on, and is seen as a part of language use, of spatial
thought, in the expression of emotion, in the arts...in all the ways we
communicate. The emphasis of this conference is on the ways in which
gesture is common between, and unifies, these many kinds of communication
and researchers' many approaches to studying these processes.

The International Society for Gesture Studies
invites participation in its third Conference,
Integrating Gestures
June 18-21, 2007
on the campus of Northwestern University
Evanston, Illinois USA

New Deadline: November 25, 2006

The International Society for Gesture Studies announces its third Conference, Integrating Gestures, to be held June 18-21, 2007, at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois (just north of Chicago). Following on the two previous conferences, Gesture: The living medium (Austin, Texas), and Interacting Bodies (Lyon, France), we invite your participation.

Gesture is ubiquitous in human communication, from the earliest developmental stages on, and is seen as a part of language use, of spatial thought, in the expression of emotion, in the arts...in all the ways we communicate. The emphasis of this conference is on the ways in which gesture is common between, and unifies, these many kinds of communication and researchers' many approaches to studying these processes.

The Society and the Conference seek proposals dealing with any aspect of gesture, in humans, in other species, and in computational systems. Examples of topics which would be appropriate are:
-gesture and speech in communication;
-gesture and sign languages;
-gesture and space;
-gesture and language development;
-gesture and neurocognition;
-gesture in human-computer interaction and in virtual humans;
-gestures, human evolution, and primate communication;
-gesture recognition;
-gesture and culture;
-gesture in the arts (dance, music, film);
-gesture and the communication of emotion, as well as others.

The Conference welcomes proposals in a variety of formats:

-Individual communications : 20 min. lecture, 10 min. discussion, selected on the basis of an abstract (2000 characters including spaces) due by November 25, 2006.

-Thematic panels : one or more 90 min. sessions including up to 3 individual communications. The thematic panels focus on a well defined common research topic. They can bring together researchers from various countries, institutions and disciplines and they are selected on the basis of a written proposal which includes a general introduction on the thematic focus of the panel as well as the individual communication abstracts (2000 characters each including spaces).

-Project panels : one or more 90 min. sessions including up to 3 individual communications. The project panels yield a special locus for the presentation of currently ongoing research projects that are established in well institutionalized contexts (research labs, public as well as private national and international scientific networks etc.). Proposals for project panels should include a general presentation of the project content and objectives as well as the individual communication abstracts (2000 characters each including spaces).

-Data sessions : 45 min. presentation, discussion and collective analysis of one short significant piece of data. The number of participants of these sessions will be restricted and a primary discussant will be proposed by the congress organization. Proposals for data sessions are due by November 25, 2006 and should include a brief description of the type of data as well as indications with regard to their duration, their transcription and the necessary equipment for their display.

-Posters : special slots for poster communications will be included in the congress program. The abstracts for the posters are due by November 25, 2006 (2000 characters).

The website contains a form for submission of proposals, which are abstracts of 2000 characters (ca. 300 words) specified as to a category of submission.

Deadline for submissions: November 25, 2006

ISGS 2007 Local organizing committee:

-Richard Ashley (Northwestern University)
-Justine Cassell (Northwestern University)
-Susan Duncan (University of Chicago)
-Susan Goldin-Meadow (University of Chicago)
-David McNeill (University of Chicago)
-Gale Stam (National-Louis University)

ISGS Officers and Gesture editors:

-Janet Bavelas (University of Victoria)
-Adam Kendon (Philadelphia/Napoli)
-Lorenza Mondada (University of Lyon)
-Cornelia Müller (University of Berlin)
-Asli Ozyürek (MPI Nijmegen)
-Mandana Seyfeddinipur (MPI Nijmegen)
-Gale Stam (National-Louis/University of Chicago)
-Jürgen Streeck (University of Texas-Austin)

Communications, including questions of all kinds, should be addressed to:
r-ashleynorthwestern.edu.

For more information about the Society, please visit our website at www.gesturestudies.com . Information about the 2007 conference may be found at www.music.northwestern.edu/isgs .



Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue




Please report any bad links or misclassified data

LINGUIST Homepage | Read LINGUIST | Contact us

NSF Logo

While the LINGUIST List makes every effort to ensure the linguistic relevance of sites listed
on its pages, it cannot vouch for their contents.