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LINGUIST List 17.322

Mon Jan 30 2006

Calls: Computational Ling/Germany;General Ling/Spain

Editor for this issue: Kevin Burrows <kevinlinguistlist.org>


As a matter of policy, LINGUIST discourages the use of abbreviations or acronyms in conference announcements unless they are explained in the text. To post to LINGUIST, use our convenient web form at http://linguistlist.org/LL/posttolinguist.html.
Directory
        1.    Kerstin Fischer, Workshop on How People Talk to Computers, Robots, and other Artificial Communication Partners
        2.    Elena Benedicto, The Languages of Central America Caribbean Coast


Message 1: Workshop on How People Talk to Computers, Robots, and other Artificial Communication Partners
Date: 27-Jan-2006
From: Kerstin Fischer <kerstinfuni-bremen.de>
Subject: Workshop on How People Talk to Computers, Robots, and other Artificial Communication Partners



Full Title: Workshop on How People Talk to Computers, Robots, and other Artificial Communication Partners

Date: 21-Apr-2006 - 23-Apr-2006
Location: Delmenhorst (Bremen), Germany
Contact Person: Kerstin Fischer
Meeting Email: < click here to access email >
Web Site: http://www.sfbtr8.uni-bremen.de/HRIworkshop/

Linguistic Field(s): Computational Linguistics; Discourse Analysis; General Linguistics; Pragmatics

Call Deadline: 15-Feb-2006

Meeting Description:

The aim of this workshop is to collect research on different ways of communicating with artificial communication partners, such as dialogue systems, speech-processing robots, and artificial conversational agents, and to get an overview of which kinds of speech and language speakers really address to such systems and why. We are interested in empirical results on different types of users, different conversational styles, and the effect of situational variables on the speech and language produced by human users. Reference points may be human-to-human communication or different settings in which particular ways of talking emerge. Interesting would also be to see different ways of adapting to such different conversational styles, including phonetic/prosodic peculiarities, as well as emotional properties of speech, lexical and syntactic choices, and different discourse behaviours.

Date:
April 21st , 4pm - 23rd, 2006, 1pm

Organisers:
Kerstin Fischer, University of Bremen (SFB/TR8), kerstinfuni-bremen.de
Anton Batliner, University of Erlangen, batlinerinformatik.uni-erlangen.de

Conference Site:
Hanse Wissenschaftskolleg (HWK), Delmenhorst (Bremen), Germany

Aims and Motivation
The workshop aims at bringing together researchers from linguistics, psychology, and computer science for the joint development of a catalogue of research desiderata, the formulation of concrete research questions and the definition of different research positions focussing on how people talk to artificial communication partners.

There is a growing body of research on the design of artificial communication partners, such as dialogue systems, robots, ECAs and so on, and thus conversational interfaces are becoming more and more sophisticated. However, so far such systems do not meet the expectations of ordinary users. One reason that prevents systems being perceived as useful and fully functional may be that there is still very little known about the ways human users actually address such conversational interfaces. How naïve speakers really interact with such systems and the language that they use to do so cannot be deduced by intuition; effective language of this kind is simply not available to introspection. Moreover, empirical linguistic and psychological studies of the ways people talk to artificial communication partners so far have yielded only very particular, corpus-, domain- or situation-specific results. What is needed, therefore, is to bring together results from various different scenarios in order to achieve a more general picture of the determining factors of different ways of talking to artificial agents, such as dialogue systems, ECAs, robots and the like, aiming at a model that promises both reusability of results achieved in different human-computer situations and predictability with respect to behaviours that may be expected of new human-computer interfaces.

We want to bring together researchers particularly interested in the following questions:
- Which different types of linguistic behaviours (phonetic, prosodic, syntactic, lexical, conversational) can be found in communication with artificial communication partners?
- Do these types of behaviours cluster in particular ways such that some behaviours tend to co-occur with others so that different types of users become apparent?
- Are there particular linguistic means to identify different types of users (unobtrusively and online)?
- Which aspects of the design condition which kinds of behaviours?
- Which roles do recipient design, alignment, and feedback play in the communication with artificial communication partners?
- Which kinds of problems in dialogue modelling and automatic speech processing can be prevented by modelling different kinds of linguistic behaviours and different types of users?

Invited speakers:

Holly Branigan (Edinburgh)
Jamie Pearson (Edinburgh)
Ludwig Hitzenberger (Regensburg)
Fiorella de Rosis (Bari)

To apply for participation in the workshop, please send a one-page summary of how your work relates to the topics outlined above before February 15th, 2006. Since workshop contributions will consist of one or more short impulse presentations on the workshop topics, please indicate what you would like to present and how much time you would like to have for each presentation. This abstract will also be made available to the other participants at the beginning of the workshop. You'll be informed about acceptance or rejection by February 25th.

Costs:
You will only have to take care of your travelling costs. All other costs, including two nights in a hotel near to the conference site, will be taken care of by the SFB/TR8 'Spatial Cognition' and the Hanse Wissenschaftskolleg. The number of participants may therefore not exceed 25.

Contact:
Kerstin Fischer kerstinfuni-bremen.de
Anton Batliner batlinerinformatik.uni-erlangen.de



Message 2: The Languages of Central America Caribbean Coast
Date: 27-Jan-2006
From: Elena Benedicto <ebenedipurdue.edu>
Subject: The Languages of Central America Caribbean Coast



Full Title: The Languages of Central America Caribbean Coast

Date: 17-Jul-2006 - 21-Jul-2006
Location: Sevilla, Spain, Spain
Contact Person: Elena Benedicto
Meeting Email: < click here to access email >
Web Site: http://www.personal.us.es/tutatis/52ICA

Linguistic Field(s): General Linguistics

Language Family(ies): Arawakan; Chibchan; Creole; Mayan; Misumalpan; Sign Language

Call Deadline: 15-Feb-2006

Meeting Description:

This Symposium wants to be a meeting point for studies, from different perspectives and approaches, on the indigenous and local languages of the Caribbean Coast (including Sign Languages). With that in mind, the Symposium will (non-exhaustively) articulate around three areas:

1. Basic linguistic descriptions which can advance the level of understanding of the structure of the languages of the region, and thus contribute to both typological and formal theoretical studies.

2. Socio-linguistic issues, including language policies and ways of articulating language-society.

3. Issues of ‘good practices’ in research methodologies, including the notion of empowerment and approaches of participatory research, how to integrate the input of the language community, the active participation and training of members of the language community in research projects, and ways in which linguistic projects can optimally be organized in the context of the Coast.

New Deadline: Feb. 15, 2006

Note:
The organizers of ICA 52, within which The Languages of the Central American Caribbean Coast takes place, have extended their deadline. Consequently, we have decide to also extend our deadline to Feb 15, 2006.

The original Call for Papers (with the new deadlines) follows.

CALL FOR PAPERS

The Languages of the Central American Caribbean Coast:
Articulating Society, Culture in the Present, Past and Future.
http://www.personal.us.es/tutatis/52ICA
icacaribpurdue.edu

A Symposium of the 52nd International Congress of Americanists.
Sevilla (Spain), July 17-21, 2006
http://www.52ica.com/

Organizers:
Elena Benedicto, Purdue University ebenedipurdue.edu
Vicky Camacho, Universidad de Sevilla tutatisus.es
Webpage: http://www.personal.us.es/tutatis/52ICA

About the Symposium
Abstracts
Other Info

About the Symposium
The Central American Caribbean region is a highly multilingual and multicultural area, with a complex system of linguistic hierarchies and interactions. This linguistic and cultural complexity not only derives from the multiplicity of levels of linguistic interaction, but is compounded by the lack and dispersion of in-depth studies on the structure of the languages in particular as well as on the socio-linguistics of the situation and on aspects of 'good-practices' in research.
This Symposium wants to be a meeting point for studies, from different perspectives and approaches, on the indigenous and local languages of the Caribbean Coast (including Sign Languages). With that in mind, the Symposium will (non-exhaustively) articulate around three areas:

1. Basic linguistic descriptions which can advance the level of understanding of the structure of the languages of the region, and thus contribute to both typological and formal theoretical studies.
2. Socio-linguistic issues, including language policies and ways of articulating language-society.
3. Issues of 'good practices' in research methodologies, including the notion of empowerment and approaches of participatory research, how to integrate the input of the language community, the active participation and training of members of the language community in research projects, and ways in which linguistic projects can optimally be organized in the context of the Coast.

Abstracts
Abstracts can be sent for 30-minute talks, on either of the topics described above.
Abstracts should not be longer than one page, with 1-inch (2.5 cm) margins on each side and font no smaller than 12pt.
Title of the abstract should appear in the first line of the page, followed by the name of the author(s) in the second line.
No more than one single-authored paper and one co-authored paper can be accepted. ICA 52 will allow no more than two papers by the same author in any of the symposia.

Where to send abstracts: electronically at icacaribpurdue.edu
Deadline for abstracts *NEW* February 15, 2006
Notification of acceptance *NEW* February 20, 2006

Other Info
*NEW*
Please note that the organizers of ICA 52 require that every participant presenting a paper register and pay by February 28th, 2006. You can check their website:

http://www.52ica.com/cuotasin.html

The organizers of ICA 52 have also set a (limited) program of grants to cover lodging expenses for participating speakers. Deadline for applications is also December 31st, and notification will be given by the end of January. For more information:

http://www.52ica.com/ayudas.html

The organizers of the Symposium will seek to supplement those grants for travel expenses for presenters who are members of an indigenous or local language community.





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