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LINGUIST List 17.608

Thu Feb 23 2006

Calls: Computational Ling/Australia

Editor for this issue: Kevin Burrows <kevinlinguistlist.org>


As a matter of policy, LINGUIST discourages the use of abbreviations or acronyms in conference announcements unless they are explained in the text. To post to LINGUIST, use our convenient web form at http://linguistlist.org/LL/posttolinguist.html.
Directory
        1.    Timothy Baldwin, The 8th International Workshop on Tree Adjoining Grammar and Related Formalisms
        2.    Timothy Baldwin, Annotating and Reasoning about Time and Events


Message 1: The 8th International Workshop on Tree Adjoining Grammar and Related Formalisms
Date: 22-Feb-2006
From: Timothy Baldwin <tim+colacl2006csse.unimelb.edu.au>
Subject: The 8th International Workshop on Tree Adjoining Grammar and Related Formalisms



Full Title: The Eighth International Workshop on Tree Adjoining Grammar and Related Formalisms
Short Title: TAG+8

Date: 15-Jul-2006 - 16-Jul-2006
Location: Sydney, Australia
Contact Person: Timothy Baldwin
Meeting Email: < click here to access email >
Web Site: http://www.sfb441.uni-tuebingen.de/TAG+8/

Linguistic Field(s): Computational Linguistics

Call Deadline: 07-Apr-2006

Meeting Description:

This workshop, the latest in a series that has been running
successfully since 1990, aims at bringing together researchers
interested in various aspects of the TAG formalism including relations
to other grammar formalisms -- this is the reason for the '+' in the
workshop's name. In the past, interaction between such formalisms has
been productive, leading for example to the development of
broad-coverage grammars, and to new insights into properties of
different formalisms. Such related formalisms would include minimalist
syntax, categorial grammar, dependency grammars, HPSG, LFG, and others
which share with TAG general properties such as lexicalization of
syntactic structure, a simple notion of local grammatical dependency,
or mildly context sensitive generative capacity.

The Eighth International Workshop on Tree Adjoining Grammar and
Related Formalisms (TAG+8)

endorsed by
The Association for the Mathematics of Language (ACL SigMoL)

15-16 July 2006
Sydney, Australia

CALL FOR PAPERS

An important subfield of computational linguistics and natural
language processing is research that centers around formal machinery
for describing language. This covers a wide range of
interdisciplinary work in the cognitive science of language, including
the mathematical and algorithmic properties of this machinery, the
grammatical description of natural language, and the mechanisms of
human language use. The results of this research will often drive
more applied and empirical areas such as efficient algorithms and
models for machine learning.

Tree Adjoining Grammar (TAG) is a prominent formalism in the study of
natural language because of its attractive formal properties and its
extended domain of locality. TAG has been studied extensively in the
last three decades with respect to both its mathematical properties
and computational applications, as well as its role in constructing
grammatical theories, models of language processing and applications.

This workshop, the latest in a series that has been running
successfully since 1990, aims at bringing together researchers
interested in various aspects of the TAG formalism including relations
to other grammar formalisms -- this is the reason for the ''+'' in the
workshop's name. In the past, interaction between such formalisms has
been productive, leading for example to the development of
broad-coverage grammars, and to new insights into properties of
different formalisms. Such related formalisms would include minimalist
syntax, categorial grammar, dependency grammars, HPSG, LFG, and others
which share with TAG general properties such as lexicalization of
syntactic structure, a simple notion of local grammatical dependency,
or mildly context sensitive generative capacity.

Invited speakers:

* Mark Johnson, Brown University
* TBA

We invite submissions on all aspects of TAG and related systems and
anticipate holding sessions devoted to:

* syntactic and semantic theory;
* mathematical properties;
* computational and algorithmic studies of parsing,
interpretation and generation;
* psycholinguistic modeling; and
* applications to natural language processing.

A key goal is thus to deepen knowledge of the formalisms that can be
used to describe natural language; the intention is for this workshop
to act as a forum for doing this, in the context of an increasing
empirical focus in the fields of computational linguistics and natural
language processing. Equally, however, it is a goal of the workshop
to encourage the connection of formal results to this empirical work.

Anonymous abstracts may be submitted for two sorts of presentations at
the workshop: spoken presentations and poster presentations. Poster
presentations are particularly appropriate for brief descriptions of
specialized implementations, resources under development and work in
progress. Regardless of type of submission, abstracts may not exceed
two pages in length (not including data, figures and references). All
abstracts are to be submitted electronically using the ACL START
conference submission system.

The workshop website is at http://www.sfb441.uni-tuebingen.de/TAG+8/.

The ACL website is at http://www.acl2006.mq.edu.au/.

Important dates:

* Deadline for submission of abstracts: April 7 2006.
* Notification of acceptance: May 9 2006.
* Deadline for camera-ready submission: June 6 2006.
* Workshop dates: July 15 to 16 2006.

Proceedings including full papers for accepted abstracts (including
both oral presentations and poster presentations) will be available
on-line and at the workshop. In addition, we will explore
possibilities for subsequent publication of workshop articles, for
example through a special issue of a journal.

Organization:

Local Arrangements Chair

Mark Dras, Macquarie University

Program Committee

Tilman Becker (co-chair), DFKI
Laura Kallmeyer (co-chair), University of Tuebingen
Srinivas Bangalore, AT&T Research
Eric de la Clergerie, INRIA
Dan Flickinger, CSLI, Stanford University
Robert Frank, Johns Hopkins University
Akio Fujiyoshi, Ibaraki University
Claire Gardent, LORIA
Chung-Hye Han, Simon Fraser University
Karin Harbusch, University of Koblenz
Geert-Jan Kruijff, Charles University
Vincenzo Lombardo, University of Turin
David McDonald
Martha Palmer, University of Colorado
Owen Rambow, Columbia University
Frank Richter, University of Tuebingen
James Rogers, Earlham College
Maribel Romero, University of Pennsylvania
Anoop Sarkar, Simon Fraser University
Giorgio Satta, University of Padua
Stuart Shieber, Harvard College
Mark Steedman, University of Edinburgh
Matthew Stone, Rutgers University
Yuka Tateisi, University of Tokyo
David Weir, University of Sussex
Vijay-Shanker, University of Delaware
Naoki Yoshinaga, University of Tokyo

Previous TAG+ meetings have been held at:

* Dagstuhl (1990)
* Philadelphia (1992)
* Paris (1994)
* Philadelphia (1998)
* Paris (2000)
* Venice (2002)
* Vancouver (2004)



Message 2: Annotating and Reasoning about Time and Events
Date: 22-Feb-2006
From: Timothy Baldwin <tim+colacl2006csse.unimelb.edu.au>
Subject: Annotating and Reasoning about Time and Events



Full Title: Annotating and Reasoning about Time and Events
Short Title: ARTE

Date: 23-Jul-2006 - 23-Jul-2006
Location: Sydney, Australia
Contact Person: Timothy Baldwin
Meeting Email: < click here to access email >
Web Site: http://www.acl2006time.org

Linguistic Field(s): Computational Linguistics

Call Deadline: 31-Mar-2006

Meeting Description:

Interest in temporal analysis and event-based reasoning has spawned a number of important meetings, particularly as applied to IE and QA tasks (cf. at COLING 2000; ACL 2001; LREC 2002; TERQAS 2002; TANGO 2003, Dagstuhl 2005).

Significant progress has been made in these meetings, leading to developing a standard for a specification language for events and temporal expressions and their orderings (TimeML). While recent research in the broader community (as indicated, for instance, in the most recent symposium on Annotating and Reasoning about Time and Events) highlights TimeML's status as an interchange format, this workshop, however, is not intended to focus on TimeML exclusively. Likewise, while the ultimate goal of temporal analysis is to facilitate reasoning about time and events, the formal aspects of this problem are being addressed by other meetings (see, for instance, the TIME 2006 Symposium). Instead, the workshop will explore largely the linguistic implications for temporal-analytical frameworks.

Annotating and Reasoning about Time and Events (ARTE)

ACL-COLING Workshop
July 23, 2006

Chairs:

Branimir Boguraev, IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, USA
branus.ibm.com
Rafael Munoz, University of Alicante, Spain
rafaeldlsi.ua.es
James Pustejovsky, Brandeis University, USA
jamespcs.brandeis.edu

1. Workshop Description

The computational analysis of time is a challenging and very topical problem, as the needs of applications based on information extraction techniques expand to include varying degrees of time stamping and temporal ordering of events and/or relations within a narrative. The challenges derive from the combined requirements of a mapping process (text to a rich representation of temporal entities), representational framework (ontologically-grounded temporal graph), and reasoning capability (combining common-sense inference with temporal axioms).

Usually contextualized in question-answering applications (with obvious dependencies of answers on time), temporal awareness directly impacts numerous areas of NLP and AI: text summarization over events and their participants; making inferences from events in a text; overlaying timelines on document collections; commonsense reasoning in narrative and story understanding.

The goal of the meeting is to address issues already raised, but not fully explored---including but not limited to the following:

- infrastructure questions: temporal annotation methodology, tools; reliable measures of inter-annotator agreement; community resources.

- analytical frameworks: temporal information extraction; approaches to temporal expression normalization; relationship between named entity recognition and temporal entities analysis; dependency (or not) upon syntactic and discourse structure.

- mapping to time ontology(ies): completeness of the representation framework; formalization of the process; additional temporal reasoning capabilities required.

- reasoning over time: in particular, (robust) reasoning within representational schemes demonstrably derivable with current IE/analytical frameworks.

- applications of temporal analytics and reasoning: in addition to NL tasks, of particular interest are studies of temporal information as it manifests in, and impacts, different domains: beyond news, time is intrinsically essential in eg. legal, health-care, intelligence, financial contexts.

- national language: relationship between language characteristics and representational frameworks; generalizations of temporal analytics across multiple languages; multi-/cross-lingual resource development.


2. Target Audience and Participants

This workshop will be of interest to those creating or exploiting temporally annotated corpora; those developing information extraction, question answering, and summarization systems relying on temporal and event ordering information; researchers involved in creating chronicles and timelines from textual data (legal, health-care, intelligence); semantic web designers and developers wanting to link web ontologies and standards to temporal markup from natural language; researchers interested in temporal properties of discourse and narrative structure; and those interested in annotation environments and development tools.


3. Important Dates and Other Information

Papers due: March 31, 2006.
Acceptance/rejection notification: April 29, 2006.
Final version due: May 20, 2006.
Conference: July 23, 2006.

For more details, refer to http://www.acl2006time.org.

4. Program Committee

David Ahn, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Nicholas Asher, University of Texas, Austin, TX USA
Paul Buitelaar, DFKI, Saarbruecken, Germany
Harry Bunt, Faculty of Arts, Tilburg University, The Netherlands
Corina Forascu, University of Iasi, Romania
Robert Gaizauskas, University of Sheffield, England
Jerry Hobbs, ISI/USC, Marina del Ray, CA USA
Graham Katz, University of Osnabrueck, Germany
Bernardo Magnini, ITC-IRST Trento, Italy
Inderjeet Mani, MITRE, Bedford, MA USA
Patricio Martinez-Barco, University of Alicante, Spain
Matteo Negri, ITC-IRST, Trento, Italy
Frank Schilder, Thomson Legal and Regulatory Co., Eagan, MN USA
Andrea Setzer, University of Sheffield, England
Marc Verhagen, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA USA





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