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LINGUIST List 17.786

Wed Mar 15 2006

Calls: General Ling/South Korea;Student Session/Germany

Editor for this issue: Kevin Burrows <kevinlinguistlist.org>


As a matter of policy, LINGUIST discourages the use of abbreviations or acronyms in conference announcements unless they are explained in the text. To post to LINGUIST, use our convenient web form at http://linguistlist.org/LL/posttolinguist.html.
Directory
        1.    Hong Pin Im, 2006 Linguistic Society of Korea Seoul International Conference on Linguistics
        2.    Artemis Alexiadou, Student Session , DGfS & GLOW Summer School 2006


Message 1: 2006 Linguistic Society of Korea Seoul International Conference on Linguistics
Date: 13-Mar-2006
From: Hong Pin Im <linguisticslinguistics.or.kr>
Subject: 2006 Linguistic Society of Korea Seoul International Conference on Linguistics


Full Title: 2006 Linguistic Society of Korea Seoul International Conference on
Linguistics
Short Title: LSK 2006 SICOL

Date: 24-Jul-2006 - 26-Jul-2006
Location: Seoul, Korea, South
Contact Person: Hong Pin Im
Meeting Email: linguisticslinguistics.or.kr
Web Site: http://linguistics.or.kr/english/

Linguistic Field(s): General Linguistics

Call Deadline: 31-Mar-2006

Meeting Description:

Theme: Form, Function and Interfaces

The Linguistic Society of Korea (LSK)

CALL FOR PAPERS

The 2006 LSK
Seoul International Conference on Linguistics
(SICOL 2006)
Theme: Form, Function and Interfaces

July 24-26 (Monday through Wednesday), 2006
Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea

Invited Speakers for Forum Lectures
April McMahon (University of Edinburgh)
Frederick J. Newmeyer (University of Washington)
Knud Lambrecht (University of Texas, Austin)
P.G.J. van Sterkenburg (Instituut voor Nederlandse Lexicologie)

General Paper Presentations
Phonetics, Phonology, Morphology, Syntax, Semantics, Pragmatics, Discourse
Analysis, Language Acquisition, Historical Linguistics, Sociolinguistics,
Psycholinguistics, Computational Linguistics, Lexicography, and any other
subjects related to General Linguistics


Workshops (Details below)
Syntax: ''Mismatches between grammatical forms and grammatical relations''
Phonology: ''Variation and formal phonological theories''
Semantics/Pragmatics:
''Typological variation and universal constraints in the mapping of
information structure and sentence form''
Time: All papers (General/Workshop) are allotted 30 minutes including discussion.

Official Language: English

Important Dates
Deadline for Submission of Abstracts (General/Workshop): March 31, 2006
Notification of Acceptance: April 20, 2006
Deadline for Submission of Full Paper: June 30, 2006

Abstracts should be at most one page long with one-inch margins and typed in at
least 11-point font. An optional second page is allowed for data and
references. Submissions are limited to one individual and one joint abstract per
author, or two joint abstracts per author. The abstract should be submitted as a
Word, PDF, or HWP attachment and sent to the LSK 2006 e-mail address:

linguisticslinguistics.or.kr

Please use 'Abstract' as the Subject header and include in the email body the
information, name(s) of author(s), title of the talk, affiliation, phone number,
email, and mailing address.

Note: Abstract for workshop should be submitted directly to the organizers,
whose email addresses are given below.


The 2006 LSK International Summer Conference: Workshops

Workshop 1 (Syntax)
''Mismatches between Grammatical Forms and Grammatical Relations''

Organizers
Frederick J. Newmeyer (University of Washington)
Jong-Bok Kim (Kyung Hee University)
Myung-Kwan Park (Dongguk University)

Invited Speakers for Workshop 1
Frederick J. Newmeyer (University of Washington)
Stan Dubinsky (University of South Carolina)
Peter Sells (Stanford University)
Joan Maling (Brandeis University)
James Yoon (University of Illinois)

Workshop Description
The relationship between phrase structure configurations and grammatical
relations (or functions) like 'subject', 'direct object', 'indirect object',
etc. is not a simple one. Even within a single language, subject and object
properties might not be confined to consistent structural configurations, but
rather be 'shared' by different configurations. For example, in English the
postposed NP (or DP) in 'there-insertion' sentences behaves in some ways, but
not all ways, like a subject and a topicalized post-verbal NP behaves in some
ways, but not all ways, like a direct object. In other languages (e. g. those of
the Austronesian family) it is in general very difficult to attach grammatical
relation labels consistently to particular structures. Furthermore, languages
differ in terms of which syntactic categories partake in a particular
grammatical relation (e. g. in some languages a subject must be an NP/DP, while
in others a wide variety of categories can take the subject role).
The purpose of this workshop is to explore all aspects of the relationship
between grammatical forms and grammatical relations. We invite abstracts for 30
minute presentations that address any empirical or theoretical issues relevant
to this problem, from any theoretical perspective.

Abstract Submission: Abstracts should be submitted electronically to the
organizers by March 30, 2006: to Jong-Bok Kim ( jongbokkhu.ac.kr )

Workshop 2 (Phonology)
''Variation and Formal Phonological Theories''

Organizers
April McMahon (University of Edinburgh)
Sang-Cheol Ahn (Kyung Hee University)
Jae-Young Lee (Seoul National University)

Invited Speakers for Workshop 2
April McMahon (University of Edinburgh)
Arto Anttila (Stanford University)

Workshop Description
Language shows a wide range of variation. Among them are cross-linguistic and
intra-linguistic variations. Within-language variation in turn includes dialect
(accent) variation, sociolinguistic variation and stylistic variation. There
seems to be misunderstanding that variation should be dealt with by
practitioners in dialectology and sociolinguistics, but not by theoreticians
from formal linguistics tradition. The misunderstanding reflects research
methodologies employed by the different linguistic disciplines. Dialectology and
sociolinguistics uses a data-driven methodology while formal linguistics employs
a theory-driven methodology. However, the difference in research methodology
between those two research camps does not necessarily imply that the former has
no interest in theory and the latter disregards linguistic data. Language
research requires the balance between theory and data. Dialectology and
sociolinguistics can incorporate statistical analyses into formal theoretical
format. Formal linguistics can base its theories on statistic data. In this
regard, variation poses challenges both to dialectology and sociolinguistics on
the one hand and to formal linguistics. Although there might be many issues
centering around variation in the study of language, this workshop will attempt
to explore the challenges which variation brings to formal phonological theories
and seek the possible solutions to the challenges. It will also offer an
opportunity to overview and repudiate a variety of approaches within formal
phonological frameworks to variation. This workshop will welcome linguists of
any theoretical background to make their contributions to it.

Abstract Submission: Abstracts should be submitted electronically to the
organizers by March 30, 2006: to Jae-Young Lee ( jaeleesnu.ac.kr )

Workshop 3 (Semantics/Pragmatics)
''Typological variation and universal constraints in the mapping of information
structure and sentence form.''

Organizers
Knud Lambrecht (University of Texas, Austin)
Yae-Sheik Lee (Kyungpook National University)
Myung-Hee Kim (Hanyang University)

Invited Speakers for Workshop 3
Knud Lambrecht (University of Texas, Austin)
Yoko Fujii (Japan Women's University)

Workshop Description
Research on the formal manifestation of different topic-focus articulations has
revealed considerable cross-linguistic diversity with respect to the ways in
which those articulations are coded in grammar. Yet surprisingly little work has
been done on possible typological variation in this domain. Languages differ
with respect to the possible mappings of phrase-structure configurations,
grammatical relations (subject and object), and pragmatic relations (topic and
focus or theme and rheme). Languages with relatively free constituent order tend
to mark focus-structure alternations via morphological marking on nominals or
via word order variation (e.g. subject inversion in SV(O) or V2 languages),
while languages with more rigid constituent order tend to resort to the use of
cleft constructions or to prosodic alternations in the distribution of sentence
accents. Moreover, even closely related languages can show striking differences
in the formal manifestation of topic and focus relations. While both English and
French use clefts, French requires their use in various environments in which
English prohibits it. In spite of such cross-linguistic diversity, there is also
strong evidence for the existence of universal constraints on the informational
structuring of propositions. Among such putative universals are the Principle of
Focus Projection (whereby an argument can project its focus to a predicate while
an adjunct typically cannot) or the Principle of the Separation of Reference and
Relation (whereby propositions cannot both introduce discourse-new referents and
provide comments about these referents). A third putative universal is the
existence of different focus-articulation types (the Predicate-Focus or
categorical, the Argument-Focus or specificational, and the Sentence-Focus or
thetic types).
The purpose of this workshop is to explore typological differences in the coding
of different focus categories as well as constraints on the mapping of focus
structure and grammatical form. We invite abstracts for 30-minute presentations
that address any empirical or theoretical issues relevant to these problems.

Abstract Submission: Abstracts should be submitted electronically to the
organizers by March 30, 2006: to Yae-Sheik Lee ( yaesheikknu.ac.kr )

The Linguistic Society of Korea
Department of Korean Language & Literature
Seoul National University,
Sillim 9-dong, Gwanak-gu, Seoul, 151-745, Korea
E-mail: linguisticslinguistics.or.kr
Homepage: http://www.linguistics.or.kr
Tel: +82-2-884-7905 Fax: +82-2-884-7906
Message 2: Student Session , DGfS & GLOW Summer School 2006
Date: 12-Mar-2006
From: Artemis Alexiadou <artemisifla.uni-stuttgart.de>
Subject: Student Session , DGfS & GLOW Summer School 2006



Full Title: Student Session , DGfS & GLOW Summer School 2006

Date: 14-Aug-2006 - 02-Sep-2006
Location: Stuttgart, Germany
Contact Person: Artemis Alexiadou
Meeting Email: artemisifla.uni-stuttgart.de
Web Site: http://ifla.uni-stuttgart.de/summerschool2006/index.shtml

Linguistic Field(s): Discipline of Linguistics

Call Deadline: 01-May-2006

Meeting Description:

We are pleased to announce the Student Session of the DGfS and GLOW Summer
School, which will be held August 14 - September 2, 2006, in Stuttgart, Germany.

The aim of the Student Session is to provide students with the opportunity to
present their work in progress and get feedback from senior researchers and
fellow-students.

The Student Session of the DGfS and GLOW Summer School 2006 invites students at
any level, undergraduates as well as graduates, to anonymously submit an
abstract, no longer than 2 pages (including references).

We invite papers for oral presentation from all areas of Linguistics.

Papers should describe original, unpublished work, complete or in progress, that
demonstrates insight, creativity and promise. Previously published papers should
not be submitted.

The preferred format of submission is PDF. All submissions must be accompanied
by a plain text identification page, stating title of abstract, name,
affiliation and email of author(s), and sent to artemisifla.uni-stuttgart.de.
Deadline for submission: May 1, 2006.

Important Dates
Deadline for Submission: May 1, 2006
Notification of authors: June 15, 2006

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
All authors have to be students (i.e. not have been awarded a PhD) by the time
of the summer school. Papers co-authored by non-students will not be accepted.
Accepted oral presentations are allotted 30 minutes, of which 20 minutes are for
presenting, and 10 minutes for discussion.

Please note that in order to present a paper at the Student Session authors of
accepted papers have to register as participants at the Summer School.
For all information concerning the summer school, consult
http://ifla.uni-stuttgart.de/summerschool2006/index.shtml



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