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LINGUIST List 18.1501

Wed May 16 2007

Calls: Lang Acquisition,Psycholing/Germany; General Ling/South Korea

Editor for this issue: Ania Kubisz <anialinguistlist.org>


As a matter of policy, LINGUIST discourages the use of abbreviations or acronyms in conference announcements unless they are explained in the text. To post to LINGUIST, use our convenient web form at http://linguistlist.org/LL/posttolinguist.html.
Directory
        1.    Kathrin Schrader, The Role of Phonology in Reading Acquisition
        2.    Andrea Schalley, Linguistic Studies of Ontology


Message 1: The Role of Phonology in Reading Acquisition
Date: 16-May-2007
From: Kathrin Schrader <kathrin_schradergmx.de>
Subject: The Role of Phonology in Reading Acquisition


Full Title: The Role of Phonology in Reading Acquisition

Date: 28-Feb-2008 - 29-Feb-2008
Location: Bamberg, Germany
Contact Person: Kathrin Schrader
Meeting Email: kathrin_schradergmx.de

Linguistic Field(s): Language Acquisition; Psycholinguistics

Subject Language(s): German, Standard (deu)

Call Deadline: 31-Jul-2007

Meeting Description

The Role of Phonology in Reading Acquisition
Workshop at the 30th Annual Meeting of the Deutsche Gesellschaft für
Sprachwissenschaft (DGfS)

A highly controversial issue in reading research is the role of phonology in
visual word identification. Whereas some researchers argue that the decoding of
written words by means of grapheme-phoneme-correspondences is an essential
requirement for access to the mental lexicon, other researchers posit that words
which are familiar, i.e. that have been decoded before, can be associated with
their meaning directly on the basis of their stored orthographic form.
Although this controversy is important for the issue how reading is taught in
primary schools it still remains unsettled. Thus whereas the whole-word approach
in reading acquisition is based on the assumption that phonology does not play a
crucial role in reading, the now popular phonics approach relies on the teaching
of phoneme-grapheme-correspondences.
A solution of this underlying controversy is crucial for evaluating and
improving the methods applied in reading acquisition. The goal of this workshop
is to contribute to this controversy and discuss the issue which rule phonology
plays in reading acquisition.
We will therefore discuss for example

- How reading acquisition proceeds in German speaking children,
- Which conclusions with respect to the above mentioned controversy can be drawn
from reading acquisition data of German children,
- How and to what extent German and English children differ with respect to
reading acquisition,
- How experimental findings may help improving the teaching of reading in German
schools.

This workshop is intended for researchers working in the areas of visual word
recognition and reading acquisition either from an experimental, theoretical or
applied perspective. Note, however, that all talks should address the importance
of their findings for German reading acquisition.

Presentations will be 20 or 40 minutes plus 10 respectively 15 minutes for
discussion depending on the number of abstracts accepted.

Workshop organizers
Martina Penke, Department of General Linguistics, University of Düsseldorf
Kathrin Schrader, Department of General Linguistics, University of Düsseldorf

Abstract Submission Guidelines:
Please submit a one page abstract including the following information:
(a) Title of the paper
(b) Name of the author(s)
(c) Affiliation(s)
(d) e-mail address(es)

Send your submissions to: penkephil-fak.uni-duesseldorf.de and / or
kathrin_schradergmx.de

Important Dates
July 31, 2007: deadline for abstracts
End of August: notification of acceptance
February 28-29, 2008: workshop in Bamberg
Message 2: Linguistic Studies of Ontology
Date: 16-May-2007
From: Andrea Schalley <andrea.schalleyune.edu.au>
Subject: Linguistic Studies of Ontology



Full Title: Linguistic Studies of Ontology

Date: 21-Jul-2008 - 26-Jul-2008
Location: Korea University, Seoul, Korea, South
Contact Person: Chu-Ren Huang
Meeting Email: churenhuanggmail.com
Web Site: http://cil18.org

Linguistic Field(s): General Linguistics

Call Deadline: 31-May-2007

Meeting Description

The workshop 'Linguistic Studies of Ontology: From Lexical Semantics to Formal
Ontologies and Back' is part of the 18th International Congress of Linguists
(CIL 18).

Recent developments in the study of ontology have important implications for
cognitive science, knowledge engineering, and theoretical linguistics. In
particular, research on lexical ontology deals with how concepts are lexicalized
and organized across languages and cultures. This workshop aims to explore this
new departure in linguistic studies by building upon the three important
premises assumed in Fellbaum (1998), Schalley and Zaefferer (2007), and Huang et
al. (2007): First, that lexicalized concepts have a special status in every
language (as opposed to concepts that require complex coding), second that
lexically coded concepts can be shared by different languages, and third that
lexicalization universals are relevant for the construction of cross-lingually
portable formal ontologies.

Final call for abstracts: Deadline May 31, 2007

Linguistic Studies of Ontology
From Lexical Semantics to Formal Ontologies and Back

Workshop at the
18th International Congress of Linguists (CIL 18)
http://cil18.org
Korea University, Seoul, Republic of Korea
July 21-26, 2008

Topics of this workshop include foundational issues pertaining to the relation
between formal ontology and linguistic ontologies, as well as descriptive issues
pertaining to the interface between conceptual ontologies and lexica. In
particular, we would like to focus on the following issues during this workshop:

- Cross-lingual portability of upper-ontologies
- Ontology-based approaches to comparative linguistics
- Ontology enrichment: from concept formation via complex coding to lexicalisation
- Possible relevance of formal ontological principles (e.g. Roles cannot subsume
Types) to psychological/linguistic reality

References
Fellbaum, Christiane. 1998. WordNet: An electronic lexical database. MIT Press.
Huang, Chu-Ren et al. Eds. 2007. Ontologies and the Lexicon. Cambridge
University Press.
Schalley, Andrea C. and Zaefferer, Dietmar. Eds. 2007. Ontolinguistics. Mouton
de Gruyter.

Submission of Abstracts

A two-page abstract including everything should be sent electronically to both
cil18cil18.org and churenhuanggmail.com. An MS Word and/or .pdf file may be
accepted.

Important Dates

Deadline for Abstract Submission: May 31, 2007
Notification of Acceptance/Rejection: August 31, 2007
Submission of accepted abstract for publication in the proceedings: February 15,
2008
Submission of final paper to be published in CIL18 CD: September 30, 2008

For more information, visit the website (http://cil18.org) or contact the
organizer at churenhuanggmail.com

Organizer

Chu-Ren Huang
Institute of Linguistics, Academia Sinica
Nankang, Taipei, Taiwan
E-mail address: churenhuanggmail.com Fax: 886-2-27856622, Tel: 886-2-26523108

Program Committee

Christiane Fellbaum (Princeton)
Shu-kai Hsieh (I-Lan)
Chu-Ren Huang (Taipei)
Alessandro Lenci (Pisa)
Adam Pease (San Francisco)
Alessandro Oltramari (Trento)
Laurent Prévot (Toulouse)
James Pustejovsky (Brandies)
Andrea C. Schalley (Armidale)
Piek Vossen (Amsterdam)
Dietmar Zaefferer (Munich)





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