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LINGUIST List 18.2723

Wed Sep 19 2007

Calls: Historical Ling/Estonia; General Ling/Denmark

Editor for this issue: Ania Kubisz <anialinguistlist.org>


As a matter of policy, LINGUIST discourages the use of abbreviations or acronyms in conference announcements unless they are explained in the text. To post to LINGUIST, use our convenient web form at http://linguistlist.org/LL/posttolinguist.html.
Directory
        1.    Martin Ehala, PhD Course: Current Trends in Historical Linguistics
        2.    Peter Kastberg, Encompassing Knowledge


Message 1: PhD Course: Current Trends in Historical Linguistics
Date: 17-Sep-2007
From: Martin Ehala <ehalamgmail.com>
Subject: PhD Course: Current Trends in Historical Linguistics
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Full Title: PhD Course: Current Trends in Historical Linguistics

Date: 18-Oct-2007 - 20-Oct-2007
Location: Tallinn, Estonia
Contact Person: Martin Ehala
Meeting Email: ehalamgmail.com
Web Site: http://www.tlu.ee/fil/ehala/Course.htm

Linguistic Field(s): Historical Linguistics

Call Deadline: 25-Sep-2007

Meeting Description

This three-day PhD course offers lectures and seminars of three leading
researchers in historical linguistics and phonology - Juliette Blevins (Max
Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig), April and Rob McMahon
(University of Edinburgh) and Nikolaus Ritt (University of Vienna).

The course gives an overview of some recent developments in historical
linguistics and how they have been challenging the accepted wisdom on the field,
both theoretically as well as in the study of separate language families. The
methodological implications of these developments are also discussed.

For detailed information and time table look http://www.tlu.ee/fil/ehala/Course.htm

Admission criteria and deadline: we admit PhD students on the basis 'first come,
fist served'. The students should send their application (name, affiliation,
e-mail address, a one page abstract of their project and a short letter of
motivation) before September 25 to Prof. Martin Ehala (ehalamgmail.com) and to
Prof. Anna Verschik (anna.verschiktlu.ee). Students from Scandinavian countries
may be eligible for travel and accommodation grants under the Nordling Graduate
Schools schema.
Message 2: Encompassing Knowledge
Date: 17-Sep-2007
From: Peter Kastberg <pkasb.dk>
Subject: Encompassing Knowledge
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Full Title: Encompassing Knowledge

Date: 15-May-2008 - 17-May-2008
Location: Aarhus, Denmark
Contact Person: Peter Kastberg
Meeting Email: 360asb.dk
Web Site:
http://www.asb.dk/about/departments/isek/forskning/konferencer/encompassingknowledge.aspx


Linguistic Field(s): General Linguistics

Call Deadline: 01-Feb-2008

Meeting Description

Track 1:
Communication of Specialised Knowledge
E.g. papers focusing on the communicative situation, its individual elements and
phases, the relation between communicative aims and means, knowledge sharing in
organisations

Track 2:
Representing Knowledge in Texts
E.g. papers focusing on the text and its structure, the relations between the
text and the level of knowledge required by the recipient

Track 3:
Knowledge Construction and Learning
E.g. papers focusing on what and how information is stored as knowledge in
communication situations and which factors influence this process

The conference will deal with knowledge from three perspectives:

Track 1: Communication of Specialised Knowledge

The generation of specialised knowledge is a necessary precondition for a
knowledge society. However, it is not sufficient in itself, as the added value
of the knowledge society lies not in the specialised knowledge, but rather in
the communication of it to a wider audience. It is thus a necessary precondition
for a knowledge society that specialised knowledge is communicated in such a way
that it may be exploited by others.

This communication of specialised knowledge within and between discourse
communities, in symmetric as well as asymmetric interaction, will constitute the
first approach to knowledge at the conference. We invite colleagues to submit
papers focusing on strategic communication, that is, the communicative
situation, its individual elements and phases as well as the relation between
communicative aims and means.

Examples of this would be analyses of the production or reception processes and
strategies that are brought into play in different genres and media, with
different communicative aims and functions. Or it may be papers throwing light
on the sharing of knowledge in organisations.


Track 2: Representing Knowledge in Texts

Knowledge may be defined as information that has been stored in mental
structures and is linked to specific situations in which it is used. In spite of
this limitation, it is still possible to represent knowledge outside mental
structures, for instance, in texts that are used to communicate knowledge from
one mental structure to another.

This representation of knowledge in texts will constitute the second approach to
knowledge at the conference. We invite colleagues to submit papers that focus on
the text and its structure as well as study the relations between the text and
the level of knowledge required by the recipient.

Examples of this might be the way the different pieces of information have been
distributed in the text, what kind of information has been included and what has
not, and how the choice of linguistic features and the linguistic complexity of
the text fit the level of knowledge expected in the intended target group. This
may be analyses at the level of text or genre, just as contrastive analyses of
texts on the same topic that address different target groups (children, young
people, grown-ups) will be welcome.


Track 3: Knowledge Construction and Learning

Knowledge is linked to mental structures and the situations in which it is used,
and the transformation of information to knowledge takes place in the
individual's assimilation and accommodation processes.

These processes will constitute the third approach to knowledge at the
conference. We invite colleagues to submit papers that focus on what and how
information is stored as knowledge in concrete communicative situations, and
what factors influence this process. Central to this approach is the effect of
the communication process within each individual recipient.

This might be analyses of individuals' learning processes, their concrete
understanding of a text, or their structuring of knowledge in mental schemata.
Furthermore, it could be the interaction between an individual's existing
knowledge base and the information offered by a text or, finally, other
cognitive prerequisites, such as learning styles, for the construction of
knowledge.

This approach to knowledge and knowledge construction is currently experiencing
rapid development, and we would especially welcome empirical analysis that may
describe these processes, e.g. by means of text-linguistic or psycho-linguistic
research methods.





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