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LINGUIST List 18.2908

Fri Oct 05 2007

Calls: Applied Ling/Spain; Computational Ling,Neuroling/USA

Editor for this issue: Ania Kubisz <anialinguistlist.org>


As a matter of policy, LINGUIST discourages the use of abbreviations or acronyms in conference announcements unless they are explained in the text. To post to LINGUIST, use our convenient web form at http://linguistlist.org/LL/posttolinguist.html.
Directory
        1.    Gemma Martínez, Congreso Internacional de Neología en las lenguas románicas
        2.    Michael Putnam, Exploring Crash-Proof Grammars


Message 1: Congreso Internacional de Neología en las lenguas románicas
Date: 04-Oct-2007
From: Gemma Martínez <iuladocumupf.edu>
Subject: Congreso Internacional de Neología en las lenguas románicas
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Full Title: Congreso Internacional de Neología en las lenguas románicas
Short Title: CINEO2008

Date: 07-May-2008 - 10-May-2008
Location: Barcelona, Spain
Contact Person: Alba Coll
Meeting Email: cineo2008upf.edu
Web Site: http://www.iula.upf.edu/agenda/cineo_08/

Linguistic Field(s): Applied Linguistics

Call Deadline: 31-Dec-2007

Meeting Description

El I Congreso Internacional de Neología en las lenguas románicas se organiza con
el objetivo de crear un punto de encuentro y discusión sobre el futuro de las
lenguas desde el punto de vista de su fuerza creativa y se dirige a todas
aquellas personas, organismos y grupos de investigación interesados en la
creación léxica como elemento indicativo del vigor de las lenguas. El congreso
tendrá lugar en Barcelona, con el patrocinio de diversos organismos académicos y
administrativos, nacionales e internacionales, y con la voluntad de que tenga
continuidad en ediciones futuras. En esta ocasión, el I Congreso Internacional
de Neología en las lenguas románicas se celebrará en la sede del Institut
d'Estudis Catalans, entre los días 7 y 10 de mayo de 2008, bajo la presidencia
de los señores Antoni M. Badia i Margarit y Bernard Quemada.

El Comité organizador se congratula de poder invitar a todas las personas
interesadas en presentar comunicaciones en el I Congreso Internacional de
Neología en las lenguas románicas (I CINEO 2008) a escribir sobre los temas
siguientes:

Aspectos teóricos sobre neología
Metodología de trabajo en neología
Reconocimiento y clasificación de neologismos
Aspectos sociales y sociolingüísticos de los neologismos
Gramática y neología
Tratamiento automático de la neología
Neología y lenguas minoritarias o minorizadas
La neología en las diferentes lenguas románicas: estudios descriptivos y
contrastivos
Aspectos cognitivos y comunicativos de la neología
Presentación de proyectos y actividades neológicas (sesión de pósters)

Los resúmenes no podrán superar los 2500 caracteres (300-350 palabras) y se
enviarán a la organización por vía electrónica a través del formulario de envío
de resúmenes.

Todas las propuestas de comunicación serán evaluadas por tres miembros del
Comité científico. Durante febrero de 2008 se comunicarán los resultados de la
evaluación a aquellas personas que figuren como autoras de la comunicación.
Aquellas que reciban una evaluación positiva deberán formalizar la inscripción
al I Congreso Internacional de Neología en las lenguas románicas para poder
presentarla.
Message 2: Exploring Crash-Proof Grammars
Date: 04-Oct-2007
From: Michael Putnam <mputnamcn.edu>
Subject: Exploring Crash-Proof Grammars
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Full Title: Exploring Crash-Proof Grammars

Date: 29-Feb-2008 - 02-Mar-2008
Location: Jefferson City, TN, USA
Contact Person: Michael Putnam
Meeting Email: mputnamcn.edu

Linguistic Field(s): Computational Linguistics; Linguistic Theories;
Neurolinguistics; Syntax

Call Deadline: 15-Jan-2008

Meeting Description

This symposium will investigate the notion of crash-proof grammars, both within
the Minimalist Program and also in other formalisms (e.g., HPSG, LFG, OT, etc.).
We invite abstract submissions addressing any and all aspects of 'crash-proof'
grammars. We especially welcome abstracts on Stroik's notion of the Survive
Principle and its relationship to the notion of crash-proofness both in the
Minimalist Program and other formalisms. Papers are encouraged in (but not
limited to) the following areas:

- Fatal vs. non-fatal derivational crashes
- The notion of 'crash-proof' in representational grammars
- The role of the lexicon in the Minimalist Program
- Phrase structure rules
- Locality in the minimalist program (and other generative systems)
- Primitive mechanisms in the narrow syntax (e.g., Merge, Remerge, etc.)
- Larger ontological commitments (e.g. phases, prolific domains, etc.)

The Minimalist Program is guided by the idea that the syntactic system of the
human language faculty optimally meets design specifications imposed by the
interface systems. In their seminal research on minimalist grammars, Frampton
and Gutmann (2000, 2002) maintain that, at least from a computational point of
view, an optimal derivational grammar generates only objects that are
well-formed and satisfy interface conditions. Such grammars are said to be
''crash-proof'' in design. This symposium will investigate the notion of
crash-proof grammars, both within the Minimalist Program and also in other
formalisms (e.g. HPSG, LFG, OT, etc.). We invite abstract submissions addressing
any and all aspects of ''crash-proof'' grammars.

We especially welcome abstracts on Stroik's notion of the Survive Principle in
the Minimalist Program. The Survive Principle - as outlined by Stroik (1999,
2000, 2007) and further developed by Putnam (2007), Stroik & Putnam (2005, 2007)
and Putnam & Stroik (in progress) - is the centerpiece of a theoretical approach
to syntactic computation that aims at parsimoniously deriving perfect (i.e.,
interface-interpretable and crash-proof) structural representations; this
approach is called Survive-minimalism. Following the conceptual eliminativism of
Chomsky's Minimalist Program (MP), Survive-minimalism radically simplifies the
design of minimalist syntax, pruning MP's unwarranted ontological commitments to
economy conditions, to non-Local syntactic operations such as Internal Merge, to
non-structure-building (non-concatenative) operations such as Agree, to
operations that map a Derivation onto itself (these operations are
structure-re-building operations, rather than structure-building operations), to
structural domains such as Phases or Prolific Domains, and to both
multiple-representations and the Transfer operation that licenses them. By
divesting itself of unnecessary operations and ontologies, Survive-syntax
significantly reduces its computational complexity. For Survive-minimalism, a
syntax requires only a Lexicon, local Merge operations, and the Survive
Principle. Given its sweeping reformulation of syntactic theory,
Survive-minimalism promises to lead syntactic analysis in new directions. One of
the principle foci of this conference is to investigate the impact that
Survive-minimalism and the Survive Principle, in particular, will have on the
future directions of syntactic theory.

Abstracts are requested to be no longer than 500 words (not including data and
references). Inquiries and abstracts can be submitted electronically to Prof.
Michael T. Putnam (mputnamcn.edu).

Deadline for Abstract Submission: December 20th, 2007
Notification of Acceptance: January 15th, 2008

Plenary Speakers

Prof. Thomas S. Stroik, University of Missouri-Kansas City
Prof. T. Daniel Seely, Eastern Michigan University



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