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LINGUIST List 18.3264

Tue Nov 06 2007

Calls: General Ling/USA; Lang Acquisition/USA

Editor for this issue: Ania Kubisz <anialinguistlist.org>


As a matter of policy, LINGUIST discourages the use of abbreviations or acronyms in conference announcements unless they are explained in the text. To post to LINGUIST, use our convenient web form at http://linguistlist.org/LL/posttolinguist.html.
Directory
        1.    Elly Van Gelderen, Linguistic Cycles Workshop
        2.    Barb Bird, 2008 SLA Graduate Student Symposium


Message 1: Linguistic Cycles Workshop
Date: 05-Nov-2007
From: Elly Van Gelderen <ellyvangelderenasu.edu>
Subject: Linguistic Cycles Workshop
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Full Title: Linguistic Cycles Workshop

Date: 25-Apr-2008 - 26-Apr-2008
Location: Tempe, AZ, USA
Contact Person: Elly Van Gelderen
Meeting Email: ellyvangelderenasu.edu
Web Site: http://www.public.asu.edu/~gelderen/CFP.doc

Linguistic Field(s): General Linguistics

Call Deadline: 04-Jan-2008

Meeting Description

Cycles of language change have not been studied in generative linguistics and
only sporadically in other frameworks. This workshop is an attempt to bring
together linguists who do work on these cycles and discuss their current
research. It also aims to come up with (a) description of linguistic cycles (in
as many languages as possible) in terms of structural principles, and (b)
explanations of the internal changes, e.g. by applying insights from language
acquisition to this debate.

Linguistic Cycles Workshop
Arizona State University
25-26 April 2008

Call for Papers

Background
Grammaticalization was identified early on in linguistics, as well as the fact
that this kind of linguistic change leads to loss and renewal. Works such as
Lehmann (1982) and Heine & Traugott (1991) inspired many linguists to pay closer
attention to this phenomenon again, especially in a functionalist framework.
Recently, however, structural accounts have started to appear (e.g. Roberts &
Roussou 2003; van Gelderen 2004) accounting for the cyclicity of the changes
involved. Van Gelderen, for instance, uses Economy Principles that help the
learner acquire a grammar that is more economical, and as a side-effect more
grammaticalized. Grammaticalization is a descriptive term and it is more
appropriate to use reanalysis to emphasize the role of the child acquiring the
language. A child listens to a particular language and will analyze the
linguistic input in the most economic way. This may result in an internal
grammar different from that of an earlier generation. In such a view,
grammaticalization and cyclical change is seen as following from Universal
Principles and the task of the linguist is to unearth these principles.
Cycles have been discussed by Hodge (1970) and Tauli (1956). Some well-known
cycles involve Negatives, where an initial single negative such as not gets to
be reinforced by nothing or replaced by never, and subjects, where full pronouns
are reanalyzed as endings on the verb. Clauses, aspect markers, articles, and
copula verbs also undergo cycles of internal change followed by external change.
In these cycles, both internal and external mechanisms are involved: internal
because, for example, all languages have negatives that `weaken', but also
external since the renewal may be determined by social factors.
Cycles of language change have not been studied in generative linguistics and
only sporadically in other frameworks. This workshop is an attempt to bring
together linguists who do work on these cycles and discuss their current
research. It also aims to come up with (a) description of linguistic cycles (in
as many languages as possible) in terms of structural principles, and (b)
explanations of the internal changes, e.g. by applying insights from language
acquisition to this debate.

Abstracts
We invite abstracts (of 2 pages or less) on all aspects of the linguistic cycle.
Students whose papers are accepted will receive $250 towards expenses.

Deadlines
Abstract deadline: 4 January 2008 (2 pages or less)
Send abstracts to: ellyvangelderenasu.edu
Notification: 30 January 2008

Invited Speakers
Jack Hoeksema, University of Groningen
Cecilia Poletto, University of Padova

Location
Arizona State University
Tempe, AZ

Local Organizers
Elly van Gelderen
Olena Tsurska
Message 2: 2008 SLA Graduate Student Symposium
Date: 05-Nov-2007
From: Barb Bird <bbirdwisc.edu>
Subject: 2008 SLA Graduate Student Symposium
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Full Title: 2008 SLA Graduate Student Symposium

Date: 11-Apr-2008 - 12-Apr-2008
Location: Madison, WI, USA
Contact Person: Barbara Bird
Meeting Email: slagradslanguageinstitute.wisc.edu

Linguistic Field(s): Language Acquisition

Call Deadline: 30-Nov-2007

Meeting Description

2008 SLA Graduate Student Symposium
'Evolving Perspectives in SLA'
Friday, April 11, 2008 & Saturday, April 12, 2008
Lowell Hall, University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW-Madison)
Co-sponsored by the University of Iowa (U of I)

Call for Papers

The field of Second Language Acquisition (SLA) is evolving to include a variety
of both cognitively- and socially-based perspectives. As is stated in the
Introduction to the December 2007 Focus Issue of The Modern Language Journal (in
press), ''some basic premises within these two traditions may be different, but
they both ask interesting and crucial questions, the answers to which can lead
to a deeper appreciation of the complex forces are work in [second language] L2
learning'' (Lafford, B. (in press). Second language acquisition
reconceptualized?: The impact of Firth and Wagner (1997). Modern Language
Journal, 91.).

We seek proposals from graduate student research, both theoretical and
empirical, that reflect the differing perspectives and methods currently used in
SLA research. The research may be interdisciplinary in nature.

Invited Speakers from the Sponsoring Institutions
Sally Sieloff Magnan (UW-Madison):
http://frit.lss.wisc.edu/frit/faculty/magnan.html
Roumyana Slabakova (U of I): http://www.uiowa.edu/~linguist/faculty/slabakova/

Invited Panel Discussion Moderator
Barbara Lafford (Arizona State University): http://www.public.asu.edu/~blafford/

The six-member panel of professors and graduate students from the U of I and the
UW-Madison will be led by Barbara Lafford, Guest Editor of the Focus Issue of
The Modern Language Journal (MLJ, 91, 5, 2007), which revisits the Firth &
Wagner debate (MLJ, 81, 3, 1997). The panel will address questions such as the
following:
Can cognitively- and socially-oriented perspectives have something to offer each
other?
What is the future of SLA research, and how may a ''global multilingual
reality'' impact it?
Is SLA still part of Applied Linguistics?
What does this debate, if anything, add to the field of SLA?

Submission Guidelines:
We invite proposals for papers and posters from graduate students at any level
of graduate study. Paper presentations will be 30 minutes with a 10-minute
discussion period following. Poster presentations will be displayed at a 1-hour
session during which poster authors will stand by their posters to discuss their
work.

Please submit abstracts by November 30, 2007 to:
slagradslanguageinstitute.wisc.edu
Notification of acceptance by December 21, 2007

Please adhere to the following format.

I. In the body of the email message, please fill all of the following fields in
the given order:
1. Title of presentation (maximum 10 words)
2. Presenter's name (family, given)
3. Department & affiliation
4. Mailing address (including city, state, zip code)
5. Phone/Fax
6. Preferred email address for correspondence
7. Summary of the presentation, with a clear theoretical or empirical focus (no
longer than 50 words). This summary will be included in the program booklet and
can not be subsequently revised.

II. Also in the body of the email message, please copy one of the following
options:
1. I wish my abstract to be considered for presentation at the 2008 SLA Graduate
Student Symposium, but if not selected for presentation, I would like it to be
considered for presentation as a poster.
2. I wish my abstract to be considered only as a poster presentation at the 2008
SLA Graduate Student Symposium.

III. As an attachment, please include an abstract. The attachment must be a
Microsoft Word document and must not exceed 300 words. Please place the title as
the first line of the document. Author and institution names should be blinded
for review.

Evaluation of Proposals:
I. Choice and clarity of topic, perspective, and/or method
II. Quality of research (literature, methods, and conclusions)
III. Contribution to field, originality
IV. Relevance to current issues in SLA

Please contact slagradslanguageinstitute.wisc.edu with questions. A website
will be forthcoming.

UW-Madison Doctoral Program in SLA: www.sla.wisc.edu
UW-Madison Language Institute: www.languageinstitute.wisc.edu
University of Iowa FLARE: http://intl-programs.uiowa.edu/academic/flare/

Barbara Bird bbirdwisc.edu
Betsy Tremmel etremmelwisc.edu
Symposium Organizers
UW-Madison

Funding for the Symposium is from the UW-Madison College of Letters and Science
Anonymous Fund.?



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