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LINGUIST List 18.529

Fri Feb 16 2007

Diss: Socioling: Feuer: 'Who Does This Language Belong To? Language...'

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        1.    Avital Feuer, Who Does This Language Belong To? Language Claim and Identity Formation in the Hebrew Language Class


Message 1: Who Does This Language Belong To? Language Claim and Identity Formation in the Hebrew Language Class
Date: 13-Feb-2007
From: Avital Feuer <avital_feueredu.yorku.ca>
Subject: Who Does This Language Belong To? Language Claim and Identity Formation in the Hebrew Language Class


Institution: York University
Program: Education
Dissertation Status: Completed
Degree Date: 2007

Author: Avital Feuer

Dissertation Title: Who Does This Language Belong To? Language Claim and Identity Formation in the Hebrew Language Class

Linguistic Field(s): Sociolinguistics

Subject Language(s): Hebrew (heb)

Dissertation Director:
Heather Lotherington

Dissertation Abstract:

This dissertation uses a dialogic sociolinguistic theory (Johnson, 2004)
interwoven with the author's personal perspective to explore the
relationship between language and ethnic identity in an advanced university
Hebrew language classroom in Canada. The study examines three key questions
that relate to this topic: 1. What unique framework of ethnic identity did
students and teachers of Hebrew construct for themselves? 2. What was the
place of Hebrew in participants' ethnic identities? 3. How did
participants' ethnic identity frameworks affect classroom dynamics? Using a
qualitative methodology composed of participant observation, a
semi-structured focus group interview, and in-depth, semi-structured,
individual interviews analyzed using the constant comparison method, 11
students and the course professor expressed their views on these questions.
The paper concludes with a discussion of the emerged themes of ethnic
sub-group convergence and divergence, language claiming among opposing
sub-groups, and the positioning of these phenomena within the historical
narrative of the Jewish people.



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