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LINGUIST List 18.624

Mon Feb 26 2007

Calls: General Linguistics/Germany; Sociolinguistics/Germany

Editor for this issue: Ania Kubisz <anialinguistlist.org>


As a matter of policy, LINGUIST discourages the use of abbreviations or acronyms in conference announcements unless they are explained in the text. To post to LINGUIST, use our convenient web form at http://linguistlist.org/LL/posttolinguist.html.
Directory
        1.    Philippa Cook, 3rd Workshop on Contrast
        2.    Inke Du Bois, Multilingual identities: new global perspectives


Message 1: 3rd Workshop on Contrast
Date: 25-Feb-2007
From: Philippa Cook <cookzas.gwz-berlin.de>
Subject: 3rd Workshop on Contrast


Full Title: 3rd Workshop on Contrast
Short Title: Contrast07

Date: 03-May-2007 - 04-May-2007
Location: Berlin, Germany
Contact Person: Philippa Cook
Meeting Email: contrast07zas.gwz-berlin.de
Web Site: http://www.zas.gwz-berlin.de/events/kontrast07/

Linguistic Field(s): General Linguistics

Call Deadline: 05-Mar-2007

Meeting Description:
3rd Workshop on Contrast: Contrast - towards a closer definition

Centre for General Linguistics (ZAS), Berlin, Germany

Final Call for Papers: Contrast - towards a closer definition

deadline is March 5th 2007

The workshop will take place in Berlin on May 3rd - 4th, 2007

Invited Speakers:
Julia Horvath (Tel Aviv)
Valeria Molnar (Lund)
Jennifer Spenader (Groningen)

Call:
The role of contrast has been investigated in many different areas: in the study
of text organisation, in the study of topic and focus and the
information-packaging of the clause, in the study of various linguistic means
for the demarcation of contrast such as contrast markers, prosody, or clause
structure. This has been done both from the perspective of theoretical
linguistics as well as psycho- and computational linguistics.

The notion of contrast usually applied takes contrast to be built on the
existence of alternatives, although the views on what role the alternatives
actually play differ. Relevant questions concern, for example, the contextual
salience of the alternatives, whether the set of alternatives is closed or open,
and/or whether or not contrastivity implies exhaustivity.

The purpose of this workshop is to elucidate what the crucial components for a
definition of contrast are, what conditions there are on alternatives in a
contrast relation, and whether these conditions are semantically or/and
pragmatically determined. Thus, we are interested in precise specifications of
contrast.

A further area we would like to address is how contrast is formally marked and
whether different marking strategies within a single language point to the
existence of different types of contrast: Do different types of contrast receive
different formal marking? Is this spelt out via prosodically differing
accents/tunes, and/or is it realised in different syntactic positions? What does
the existence of different types of contrast imply for their interpretation?

Submissions:
We invite submissions to any of the above aspects in all areas of linguistics
(pragmatics, semantics, syntax, morphology, phonology) and their interfaces. We
welcome both theoretical contributions as well as papers working with e.g.
psycho-, corpus- or computational linguistic evidence.

Authors should submit an anonymous abstract. The length of abstracts for talks
should be at most 2 single-column pages including literature. All submissions
should include a separate cover page specifying the authors' names, affiliation,
address, e-mail address and title of the paper. The abstracts should be
submitted electronically (pdf, ps or doc format) to:

contrast07zas.gwz-berlin.de

Important Dates:
Deadline for Submissions: March 5th, 2007
Notification of Acceptance: March 23rd 2007
Conference: May 3rd - 4th, 2007

Organisation:
Philippa Cook (ZAS)
Werner Frey (ZAS)
Ewald Lang (Humboldt University)
Sophie Repp (Humboldt University)
Fabienne Salfner (ZAS)

History: This conference is a follow-up of two earlier workshops on contrast: in
2003 in Nijmegen, the Netherlands (''Contrast in Discourse'' organised by Helen
de Hoop and Peter de Swart) and in 2005 in Stockholm, Sweden (''Contrast,
Information Structure and Intonation'' organised by Jennifer Spenader).

The contrast workshop will be immediately followed on Saturday May 5th by an
affiliated workshop (which is also open to those attending the contrast
workshop) on the topic of:

Bidirectional Optimality Theory
May 5th, 2007 (with an evening lecture by an invited speaker on Friday May 4th)
Organized by Anton Benz and Manfred Krifka (see the separate call for papers).

The organizers are planning to publish a selection of the results of the
conference either as a special issue of a journal or as a book.

The conference is organised as part of the ZAS projects P6 (Parallelism) and P9
(Positional and Interpretative Variation in the Domain of Sentence Topic).
Message 2: Multilingual identities: new global perspectives
Date: 24-Feb-2007
From: Inke Du Bois <duboisuni-bremen.de>
Subject: Multilingual identities: new global perspectives



Full Title: Multilingual identities: new global perspectives

Date: 24-Aug-2008 - 28-Aug-2008
Location: Essen, Germany
Contact Person: Inke Du Bois
Meeting Email: duboisuni-bremen.de

Linguistic Field(s): Sociolinguistics

Call Deadline: 27-Feb-2007

Meeting Description:
Using one language does not necessarily mean that that language's cultural
identity is taken (Kramsch, 2006). Instead, it can hint towards that direction,
but that is ultimately due to other discourse identities that are more subtle
and complicated issues. Sometimes, alternative identities are displayed and not
only L1 or L2, but a third language or variety is used. It has been found that
in racial and ethnic identity construction of minority speakers (Buchholz and
Hall, 2005), for example, Asian Americans adopt African American vernacular
(Chun, 2001), Italians in Germany use the variety of the strongest minority -
aspects of or Turkish German - to identify as non-majority members (Kallmeyer
& Keim, 2002) and therefore create innovative linguistic cultural identities in
social interaction.
Against this background, we invite proposals which deal with bilingualism at the
intersections of
- language acquisition and code-switching and identity
- language attrition, code-switching and identity
- multilingual code- switching and identity
- identity and variety switching

Call for Papers

Title:
Multilingual identities: new global perspectives on immigrant discourse

Workshop organizers:
Inke Du Bois, Fremdsprachenzentrum der Hochschulen im Land Bremen, Germany
Eleni Michalopoulou, Lancaster University, UK

AILA conference,
August 24-29, 2008
Essen, Germany

In immigration contexts, national cultural identities are embedded within
multiple cultural communicative spaces. Individuals immigrating to new countries
are involved in a second-language (L2) acquisition process, and very often, L2
acquisition in the L2 culture context influences the surface structure of the
first language L1. There is then a need to employ L2 language features within
the L1, as new cultural aspects are learned and the mental lexicon is expanded
with new cultural experiences. In the use of two or more languages,
code-switching occurs in the speech of immigrants having various levels of L2
language acquisition. On the other hand, depending on the ethnolinguistic
vitality of the community, L1 may no longer be used in everyday life and thus
lexical and structural features are increasingly difficult to retrieve by
speakers (Ng, 2007). Investigations on language attrition and code-switching
typically have not been combined in investigations on bilingualism, but both
phenomena very often accompany the L2 learning process in an L2 cultural
context. This means that additive (L2) and subtractive (L1) bilingualism occur
at the same time in immigration and only few models have attempted to
incorporate both (Walters, 2005). For code-switching, there are alternational
models in the tradition of conversation analysis (Auer, 1999) focusing on
multilingual sequential turn-taking. On the other hand, insertional models
(Myers Scotton, 1995, 2006; Poplack, 1982) attempt to identify structural rules
that speakers follow when switching between languages. Ultimately,
code-switching is an identity-related factor and the social functions and
effects have been captured by linguists as well (Auer, Gumperz, Li Wei, Myers
Scotton, Poplack). Gumperz, for example identified L1 as minority language as
'we-code,' associated with informal and in-group activities, and L2 as
'they-code,' associated with formal, out-group activities. These categories were
used by researchers whose analyses ''rest on naïve social theory which presents
concepts such as agency, action, identity and social role as
non-problematic'' (Sebba and Wootton, 1998: 262). Gumperz had not intended this
static identification and was misunderstood in that he conceptualized this
linguistic group identity as symbolic, and not as a prediction of usage of
either in- or out-group language. Researchers in the field of bilingualism
indicated that using one language does not necessarily mean that that language's
cultural identity is taken (Kramsch, 2006). Speaking German does not
automatically entail German identity, and speaking Turkish does not
automatically mean identification as a Turk. Instead, it can hint towards that
direction, but that is ultimately due to other discourse identities that are
more subtle and complicated issues. Sometimes, alternative identities are
displayed and not only L1 or L2, but a third language or variety is used. It has
been found that in racial and ethnic identity construction of minority speakers
(Buchholz and Hall, 2005), for example, Asian Americans adopt African American
vernacular (Chun, 2001), Italians in Germany use the variety of the strongest
minority - aspects of or Turkish German - to identify as non-majority members
(Kallmeyer & Keim, 2002) and therefore create innovative linguistic cultural
identities in social interaction. When such alignments are false or problematic,
denaturalization occurs, thus a real aspect of identity is knowingly hidden or
masked. In a study on ethnic identity (Bailey, 2000), for example, two
Dominician American high-school boys play a prank on a classmate and pretend to
be African American, only to speak Spanish to each other later in the same
conversation. Albanian immigrants to Greece who English and Americans living in
Europe pretend to be of other nationalities. This display of hybridity, and
testing if one could pass as a member of another group is another issue in
multilingual identity construction. Against this background, we invite proposals
which deal with bilingualism at the intersections of
- language acquisition and code-switching and identity
- language attrition, code-switching and identity
- multilingual code-switching and identity

Literature Selection:
Auer, Peter (1999). ''Introduction. Bilingual Conversation Revisited'' in Auer,
P. (ed.) Code-Switching in Conversation. London/New York: Routledge.
Buchholz, Mary and Kira Hall (2005) ''Identity and interaction: a sociocultural
approach.'' In Discourse Studies 585-612.
Gumperz, John and Jenny Cook-Gumperz. (1982) ''Introduction: language and the
communication of social identity.'' Language and Social Identity. Ed. John
Gumperz. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1-21.
Myers Scotton, Carol. (1988) ''Code-Switching and Types of Multilingual
Communities.'' Language Spread and Language Policy. Ed. Peter Lowenberg.
Washington DC: Georgetown University Press,. 61-82.
Myers-Scotton, Carol. (1995a) Social Motivations for Codeswitching. Oxford:
Claredon Press.
Myers-Scotton (1995b). Duelling Languages. Oxford. Claredon Press,
Myers-Scotton (2006). Multiple Voices. An introduction to bilingualism. Malden,
MA: Blackwell Publishers.
Pavlenko, Aneta. (2004) ''L2 influence and L1 attrition in adult bilingualism''
in Schmid, Monika et al. (eds) First language attrition. Interdisciplinary
perspectives on methodological issues. Amsterdam: Benjamins.
Sebba, Mark and Tony Wootton. (1998). '''We, they and Identity' Sequential
versus identity related explanation in code-switching'' Code-Switching in
Conversation. Language, Interaction and Identity. Ed. P. Auer. London: Blackwell.
Schmid, M.S., B. Köpke, M. Keijzer & L. Weilemar (eds).(2004): First Language
Attrition: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Methodological Issues.
Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins.
Walters, Joel (2005) Bilingualism: the sociopragmatic-psycholinguistic
interface. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

A proposal for an individual paper (20 mins + 10 mins discussion)
consists of these parts:
Title (up to 100 characters)
The name, affiliation, and email address of the presenter(s)
A proposal (up to 2500 characters)
A summary (up to 500 characters)
for inclusion in the panel to contribute related topics until February 26, 2007
for a symposium

We are planning a publication in a sociolinguistics journal.





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