* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
LINGUIST List logo Eastern Michigan University Wayne State University *
* People & Organizations * Jobs * Calls & Conferences * Publications * Language Resources * Text & Computer Tools * Teaching & Learning * Mailing Lists * Search *
* *
LINGUIST List 18.930

Wed Mar 28 2007

Confs: Sociolinguistics/Japan

Editor for this issue: Jeremy Taylor <jeremylinguistlist.org>


To post to LINGUIST, use our convenient web form at http://linguistlist.org/LL/posttolinguist.html.
Directory
        1.    Goro Kimura, European Languages and Asian Nations


*******************************************************************************
Fund Drive FLASH: We still need $37,468 to end Fund Drive.
If you have not donated, please visit http://linguistlist.org/donate.html
*******************************************************************************

Message 1: European Languages and Asian Nations
Date: 25-Mar-2007
From: Goro Kimura <nitobe2007gmail.com>
Subject: European Languages and Asian Nations


European Languages and Asian Nations
Short Title: 5th Nitobe Symposium

Date: 02-Aug-2007 - 03-Aug-2007
Location: Tokyo, Japan
Contact: Goro Kimura
Contact Email: nitobe2007gmail.com
Meeting URL: http://www.info.sophia.ac.jp/g-areas/nitobe2007.htm

Linguistic Field(s): Sociolinguistics

Meeting Description:

The symposium will explore the historical and contemporary role and future
perspectives of European languages in Asia. It will also raise the question of
whether it is possible to formulate an international language policy that is
uniquely Asian, given the firm establishment of European languages, or whether
each Asian country should simply go its own way. As far as language policy is
concerned, are the words "Western" and "global" mere synonyms, or do the Asian
languages have a role in international language policy and does globalization
have its uniquely Asian aspects?

European languages have played a key role in the modernization process in Asia.
While European languages have served as an instrument of colonialist rule, they
have also been welcomed as tools for the introduction of modern technologies and
ideas from the West. Now, several centuries after the process began, a number
of European languages have taken root in Asian countries, while other languages
have largely lost their former leading positions. European languages have thus
become part of Asian history and an integral part of the Asian present.

The symposium will explore the historical and contemporary role and future
perspectives of European languages in Asia. It will also raise the question of
whether it is possible to formulate an international language policy that is
uniquely Asian, given the firm establishment of European languages, or whether
each Asian country should simply go its own way. As far as language policy is
concerned, are the words ''Western'' and ''global'' mere synonyms, or do the
Asian languages have a role in international language policy and does
globalization have its uniquely Asian aspects?

Questions to be addressed include the following:

- How have European languages influenced, and how do they continue to influence,
communication in Asia? What aspects of life are most dependent on them; what
aspects make most use of Asian languages?
- What are the consequences for Asians and Asian societies of the present
language system, in which European and Asian languages divide between them
various functions (communication, culture, identity, policy)?
- Do European languages contribute only to globalization, or also to development
of national and regional identities? How do they influence cultural development?
- Who are the owners of these European languages? To what extent have the
peoples of Asia made these languages their own?
- Can one point to an increase in the international (regional or worldwide)
significance of any Asian languages?
- What is the future of the English language in Asia? What role does it play in
the various individual countries? What factors will influence its further
expansion and integration?
- What other European languages have a significant role in Asia?
- What principles should guide realistic national or international language
policy in Asia?
- What place should European and Asian languages occupy in the education system?
- Are language-policy models elsewhere in the world applicable to Asia - for
example European multilingualism, Swiss plurilingualism, Canadian bilingualism?


Program. The program will consist of lectures by invited lecturers, presentation
of formal papers by other invitees, and general debate and discussion.
Sub-topics.
1. Introductory lectures
2. Problems and challenges of the worldwide language regime.
3. An English-only Asia? The role of English in Asia.
4. Languages of European origin in Asia, e.g. French, German, Portuguese,
Esperanto.

Application.
Please request an invitation to the symposium before 30. May 2007.

This Year the LINGUIST List hopes to raise $55,000. This money will go to help keep the 
List running by supporting all of our Student Editors for the coming year.

See below for donation instructions, and don't forget to check out our Fund Drive 2007 
LINGUIST List Superhero Adventure for some Fund Drive fun!

http://linguistlist.org/donation/fund-drive2007/ 

There are many ways to donate to LINGUIST!

You can donate right now using our secure credit card form.

Alternatively you can also pledge right now and pay later.

For all information on donating and pledging, including information on how to donate by 
check, money order, or wire transfer, please visit:

http://linguistlist.org/donate.html

The LINGUIST List is under the umbrella of Eastern Michigan University and as such can 
receive donations through the EMU Foundation, which is a registered 501(c) Non Profit 
organization. Our Federal Tax number is 38-6005986. These donations can be offset against 
your federal and sometimes your state tax return (U.S. tax payers only). For more 
information visit the IRS Web-Site, or contact your financial advisor.

Many companies also offer a gift matching program, such that they will match any gift 
you make to a non-profit organization. Normally this entails your contacting your human 
resources department and sending us a form that the EMU Foundation fills in and returns 
to your employer. This is generally a simple administrative procedure that doubles the 
value of your gift to LINGUIST, without costing you an extra penny. Please take a moment 
to check if your company operates such a program.

Thank you very much for your support of LINGUIST!

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------





Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue




Please report any bad links or misclassified data

LINGUIST Homepage | Read LINGUIST | Contact us

NSF Logo

While the LINGUIST List makes every effort to ensure the linguistic relevance of sites listed
on its pages, it cannot vouch for their contents.