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LINGUIST List 19.116

Thu Jan 10 2008

Calls: General Ling/Jordan

Editor for this issue: Ania Kubisz <anialinguistlist.org>


As a matter of policy, LINGUIST discourages the use of abbreviations or acronyms in conference announcements unless they are explained in the text. To post to LINGUIST, use our convenient web form at http://linguistlist.org/LL/posttolinguist.html.
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        1.    Sane Yagi, JU-Teaching Arabic to Speakers of Other Languages 2008


Message 1: JU-Teaching Arabic to Speakers of Other Languages 2008
Date: 29-Dec-2007
From: Sane Yagi <saneyagigmail.com>
Subject: JU-Teaching Arabic to Speakers of Other Languages 2008
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Full Title: JU-Teaching Arabic to Speakers of Other Languages 2008
Short Title: JU-TASOL2008

Date: 06-May-2008 - 08-May-2008
Location: Amman, Jordan
Contact Person: Dr. Sameer Qatami
Meeting Email: tasol2008gmail.com

Linguistic Field(s): General Linguistics

Subject Language(s): Arabic, Standard (arb)

Language Family(ies): Semitic

Call Deadline: 30-Jan-2008

Meeting Description:

Jordan University is organizing its first international conference on the
Teaching of Arabic to Speakers of Other Languages. It shall be held from
May 6th to 8th, 2008. It is organized by the Faculty of Arts' Department of
Arabic in collaboration with the Linguistics Department, the Department of
Curriculum and Instruction, and the Language Center. This conference will
be held in the beautiful city of Amman during the Spring season.
The conference covers a broad spectrum of interest within the teaching of
Arabic. Therefore, researchers from the various disciplines in Linguistics,
Education, and Information Technology are encouraged to participate.

Jordan University is organizing its first international conference on the
Teaching of Arabic to Speakers of Other Languages. It shall be held from
May 6th to 8th, 2008. It is organized by the Faculty of Arts' Department of
Arabic in collaboration with the Linguistics Department, the Department of
Curriculum and Instruction, and the Language Center. This conference will
be held in the beautiful city of Amman during the Spring season.

The conference covers a broad spectrum of interest within the teaching of
Arabic. Therefore, researchers from the various disciplines in Linguistics,
Education, and Information Technology are encouraged to participate.
January 30, 2008 - Submission of abstract
February 7, 2008 - Notification of abstract acceptance
April 1, 2008 - Submission of full paper
April 15, 2008 - Notification of paper acceptance
May 1, 2008 - Submission of camera-ready paper
May 6-8, 2008 - Conference

Linguistic Areas:
Syntax and semantics
Phonetics and phonology
Language acquisition
Sociolinguistics
Psycholinguistics and neurolinguistics
Computational linguistics

Educational Areas:
Curriculum
Pedagogy
Educational psychology
Philosophy of education
Educational technology

Experiential Knowledge:
In-class teaching
Program administration
Computer-assisted instruction
Arabic for specific purposes

General Issues:
Cultural considerations and attitudes to teaching Arabic to speakers of
other languages
The politics of teaching and researching Arabic

Abstract requirements:
Abstracts and papers are written in Arabic. Abstracts must not exceed 400
words in length, but papers may be of any length. The abstract must have
the topic stated clearly, the methodology explained, and the expected
conclusions outlined.

Submission requirements:
Submissions must be sent first in SOFT copies as e-mail attachments to
tasol2008gmail.com and then in print together with a diskette or CD to Dr.
Sameer Qatami, Faculty of Arts, University of Jordan, Amman 11942, Jordan.
The electronic file format must be either in Microsoft Word, RTF, or PDF.
Please state the name(s) of the author(s) in full along with their
individual, affiliation, postal address, and email address. Hard copies are
essential only to verify the formatting of electronic versions.

Document Format:
- Margin: vertical = 1 inch; horizontal = 1.25 inches.
- Font: Times New Roman.
- Title of the paper: size = 16 font; skip one line before title.
- Author's information:
Name(s): size = 12 font; order = First name, Last name (1st letter
capitalized).
Affiliation(s): size = 9 font.
E-mail address(es): size = 9 font.
- ''Abstract'': size = 14 font; text = 12 font; 1.5 spaced.
- ''Keywords'': size = 14 font; text = 12 font.
- ''References'': size = 12 font; aligned in the center; text = 9 font.
- File: DOC, RTF, or PDF

Amman
Amman, the modern capital of Jordan, is one of the oldest inhabited places
in the world. Recent excavations have uncovered homes and towers believed
to have been built during the Stone Age with many references to it in the
Bible. Amman was known as Rabbath -Ammon, the capital of the Ammonites. It
was also referred to as ''the city of waters''.

In the 3rd century BC, the city was renamed Philadelphia after the
Ptolemaic ruler Philadelphus. the City later came under Seleucid as well as
Nabataean rule, until the Roman General Pompey annexed Syria and made
Philadelphia part of the Decapolis league - a loose alliance of initially
ten free city states under over all allegiance to Rome. Under the influence
of the Roman culture, Philadelphia was reconstructed in typically grand
Roman style with colonnaded streets, baths, a theatre and impressive public
buildings.
During the Byzantine period, Philadelphia was the seat of a bishop and
therefore several churches were built. The city declined somewhat until the
year 635 AD. As Islam spread northwards from the Arabian Peninsula, the
land became part of its domain. Its original Semitic name Ammon or Amman
was returned to it.

Amman 's modern history began in the late 19th century, when the Ottomans
resettled a colony of Circassian emigrants in 1878. As the Great Arab
Revolt progressed and the state of Transjordan was established, King
Abdullah I, founder of the Hashemite kingdom of Jordan, made Amman his
capital in 1921. Since then, Amman has grown rapidly into a modern,
thriving metropolis of well over a million people.


Tourist Attractions in Jordan

Roman Forum in Amman
The Roman time Public Square, bordered by the theatre and the Odeon, once
was among the largest of the Empire (over 100 * 50 meters). A row of
columns in the front of the theatre is what remains of the colonnades which
once flanked it.

Roman Theatre in Amman
An imposing monument set into the side of the mountain. Its 33 rows of
seats can accommodate almost 6000 spectators. The theatre, which dates back
to approximately the mid 2nd century AD, comes back to life with musical
and dance performance held regularly under the moonlit summer.

Odeon in Amman
Adjacent to the theatre and set on the east side of the Forum, the Odeon
dates back to the 2nd century AD. The lower seats of this monument, which
could accommodate up to 500 spectators, have been restored and the Odeon is
used occasionally for concerts.

Jerash (Gerasa)
Straddling one of the ancient worlds key trade routes, Jerash offers
extensive and breathtaking ruins of colonnaded streets, arches, temples,
and baths in a remarkable state of preservation and completeness. The
visitor is free to wander through these sites and observe at close hand the
intricacy and sophistication of the workmanship and the artistry of the
cravings and decorations. During the summer, the Jerash Festival of culture
and arts brings together the finest talent, both Arab and international, to
revive one of the great monuments of civilization.

Ajlon Castle
Twenty four kilometers west of Jerash, overlooking the Jordan Valley north
of Amman, Ajlon was built in 1184 by the Ayyubid to encounter the Crusader
advance in east Jordan and to protect the communications between Cairo and
Damascus. The hulking remains of these once powerful citadels await the
eager explorer with their mighty military exteriors, their dark inner
passageways, and their mute testimony to the struggles for power so
familiar to this historic land.

Madaba
Madaba is an archaeological park and an ancient city of mosaics. It has
the oldest preserved ancient mosaic map of the holy lands.

Mount Nebo
Mount Nebo is one of the most revered holy sites of Jordan, located just a
short drive west of the Roman Byzantine town of Madaba, for this is where
Moses was buried. The sites association with the last days of Moses is
described in moving words in Deuteronomy (43:1-7). The episode of Balak and
Balam (2:13-26) also takes place here.
The site's other name is Pisgah: ''And Moses went up from the plains of
Moab to Mt Nebo, to the top of Pisgah which is opposite Jerico''. From the
mountaintop, you can admire the dazzling view across the Jordan Valley and
the Dead Sea, to the rooftops of Jerusalem and Bethlehem.

Dead Sea
The Dead Sea eastern coast in Jordan is one of the most spectacular
natural and spiritual landscapes in whole world.
The leading attraction at the Dead Sea is the warm, soothing, super-salty
seawater, which is nine times saltier than Mediterranean Sea water. It is
rich in chloride salts of Magnesium, sodium and potassium, in bromine,
potash and several other minerals and salts. This unusually salty, buoyant
and mineral-rich water has attracted visitors since ancient times, all of
whom have floated effortlessly on their backs while soaking up the water's
healthy minerals along with the gentler, filtered rays of the Jordanian sun.
The Dead Sea's total attraction is due to its unique combination of several
factors: the chemical composition of its water, the filtered sun rays and
oxygen -rich air, the mineral- rich black mud along the shoreline, and the
adjacent fresh water and thermal mineral spring.

Umm Qays
This is the most dramatically situated of the Decapolis cities. At Umm
Qays, one can explore fascinating ruins -a stunning black basalt theater, a
colonnaded main street, and a city gate, among others -and enjoy
spectacular views of the Jordan Valley, the Sea of Galilee, and Golan
heights. Umm Qais has a charming museum in a restored Ottoman house in
addition to its other attractions.


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