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LINGUIST List 19.1899

Mon Jun 16 2008

Calls: Language Acquisition/Germany; Historical Linguistics/Germany

Editor for this issue: Stephanie Morse <morselinguistlist.org>


As a matter of policy, LINGUIST discourages the use of abbreviations or acronyms in conference announcements unless they are explained in the text. To post to LINGUIST, use our convenient web form at http://linguistlist.org/LL/posttolinguist.html.
Directory
        1.    Anja Mueller, Production-Comprehension Asymmetries in Child Language
        2.    Jessica Voges, Postcolonial Translocations GNEL / ASNEL Conference


Message 1: Production-Comprehension Asymmetries in Child Language
Date: 16-Jun-2008
From: Anja Mueller <AnjaMuellerem.uni-frankfurt.de>
Subject: Production-Comprehension Asymmetries in Child Language
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Full Title: Production-Comprehension Asymmetries in Child Language

Date: 03-Mar-2009 - 06-Mar-2009
Location: Osnabrueck, Germany
Contact Person: Anja Mueller
Meeting Email: Anja Mueller
Web Site:
http://www.uni-frankfurt.de/fb/fb10/inst_i/DaZ/Wissenschaftliche_Tagungen/DGfS_2009__AG3.html


Linguistic Field(s): Language Acquisition

Call Deadline: 20-Aug-2012

Meeting Description:

We are very pleased to announce the Workshop Comprehension-Production-
Asymmetries in Child Language, to be held at the University of Osnabrück
(Germany), March 3 to March 6, 2009, as part of the Annual Meeting of the German
Linguistics Society (DGfS).

The workshop comprises a main and a special session. The main session aims at
considering comprehension-production asymmetries in child language from
theoretical and methodical perspectives (chairs by Angela Grimm & Anja Müller).
The topic of the special session is Pronouns, Clitics, and Binding Theory
(chairs by Cornelia Hamann & Esther Ruigendijk).

Contributions should address at least one of the following topics:

New results and theoretical accounts
Monolingual and bilingual acquisition
Atypical development
Advantages and disadvantages of experimental research methods

Presentations are allotted to 25 minutes (20 min. presentation and 5 min. for
discussion).

A more detailed description of the workshop (call for the main session and call
for the special session) and information on the DGfS-Meeting can be found at:

http://www.uni-frankfurt.de/fb/fb10/inst_i/DaZ/Wissenschaftliche_Tagungen/DGfS_2009_AG3


Guidelines for abstract submissions:

The abstract should consist in a two-pages MS-Word or PDF file. The first page
should include the title of your presentation and your abstract (2.5 cm margins
on each side and 12pt font size, single-spaced). The second page should include
the authors name(s), affiliation(s), email address and again the title of your
presentation. Please indicate at this page the session (main or special session)
you are submitting the abstract to. Submit your abstract to
dgfs-ag3dlist.uni-frankfurt.de

Abstract and workshop language is English.

Dates and Deadlines
Call deadline: August 20, 2008.
Notification of acceptance: September 5, 2008
Preliminary program, September 16, 2008
Final Program: December 1, 2008
Workshop: March 3 to March 6, 2009.
Message 2: Postcolonial Translocations GNEL / ASNEL Conference
Date: 16-Jun-2008
From: Jessica Voges <gnel2009gmail.com>
Subject: Postcolonial Translocations GNEL / ASNEL Conference
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Full Title: Postcolonial Translocations GNEL / ASNEL Conference

Date: 21-May-2009 - 24-May-2009
Location: Muenster, Germany
Contact Person: Mark Stein
Meeting Email: gnel2009gmail.com
Web Site: http://www.gnel2009.de

Linguistic Field(s): Historical Linguistics

Subject Language(s): English (eng)

Call Deadline: 30-Sep-2008

Meeting Description:

20th annual GNEL / ASNEL Conference Postcolonial Translocations

The conference is concerned with the concept of translocation, which denotes
more than a simple 'change of location' or 'dislocation' (which often implies a
privileging of 'origins' over 'new' locations), because this concept can leave
open points of departure and destination. Translocation is not only a process
(the transfer of people, cultural products, borders), but can also mean a new
kind of location, a trans-location consisting of fractured and variously
connected spaces.

Call for Papers

Postcolonial Translocations
20th annual GNEL / ASNEL Conference
University of Münster, Germany
21 - 24 May 2009

Cultural products emerge from ever more shifting grounds, and translocation is
becoming increasingly significant: narrative fiction, poetry, drama, and film
are created with a view to being marketed in several languages and markets;
authors and producers move from one country to another; global audiences consume
cultural products in different locales, creating demands in several
marketplaces; national borders are fought over and redrawn, materially as well
as textually, further undermining any sense of a stable location.

Translocation denotes more than a simple 'change of location' or 'dislocation'
(which often implies a privileging of 'origins' over 'new' locations), because
this concept can leave open points of departure and destination.

Translocation is not only a process (the transfer of people, cultural products,
borders), but can also mean a new kind of location, a trans-location consisting
of fractured and variously connected spaces.

Postcolonialists read contemporary and historical texts across disparate
geographic and temporal spaces. In the context of globalisation and
neo-imperialisms, not only unequal development and political instability but
also violence and gender inequality continue to shape complex postcolonial
realities; nation and narration, place and displacement, location and migration
remain major paradigms of postcolonial critique. The postcolonial lexicon
clearly indicates our concern with placement, movement and interconnection. But
arguably our understanding of what constitutes a specific location has
dramatically changed over the last few decades and requires reading practices
which reflect the communicative, political and aesthetic concerns of translocal
representation. The growing body of texts which - linguistically, aesthetically,
and thematically - draw on and combine distinct cultural repertoires is an
indication of the increasing relevance of postcolonial translocations today.

Under the sign of translocation, this conference promotes a critical evaluation
of postcolonial texts and media whilst also investigating their institutional
academic contexts. Possible topics for papers and panels include:

-Border regimes and border-crossings
-Imagining translocal space
-Representations of forced and voluntary relocations
(incl. slavery, indentureship, transportation, migration)
-Postcolonial cultural transformations
-Authority and authenticity in postcolonial texts
-Transmigration
-Translation and translocation
-Translocal food and its representations
-Moving species: Biological transfers
-Online writing, online reading
-Cyber diasporas
-Diaspora literature
-Travel writing
-Academic locations and reallocations of Postcolonial Studies
-20 years on: GNEL/ASNEL and its institutional locations

You can email abstracts of papers (20 minutes) or proposals for panels
comprising three papers (90 minutes) to the following address: gnel2009gmail.com

The first call for papers will close on 30 September 2008.

Contact
Professor Mark Stein
Chair of English, Postcolonial and Media Studies
English Department, WWU Münster
Johannisstr. 12-20
48143 Münster, Germany
www.anglistik.uni-muenster.de/ptts

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