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LINGUIST List 19.2873

Sun Sep 21 2008

Calls: General Ling/Germany; General Ling/Germany

Editor for this issue: Kate Wu <katelinguistlist.org>


As a matter of policy, LINGUIST discourages the use of abbreviations or acronyms in conference announcements unless they are explained in the text. To post to LINGUIST, use our convenient web form at http://linguistlist.org/LL/posttolinguist.html.
Directory
        1.    Artemis Alexiadou, Roots
        2.    Magnus Huber, Pidgins and Creoles in a Comparative Perspective


Message 1: Roots
Date: 21-Sep-2008
From: Artemis Alexiadou <artemisifla.uni-stuttgart.de>
Subject: Roots
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Full Title: Roots

Date: 10-Jun-2009 - 12-Jun-2009
Location: Stuttgart, Germany
Contact Person: Artemis Alexiadou
Meeting Email: artemisifla.uni-stuttgart.de
Web Site:
http://ifla.uni-stuttgart.de/institut/mitarbeiter/florian/Roots/Roots-home.html

Linguistic Field(s): General Linguistics

Call Deadline: 15-Mar-2009

Meeting Description:

This workshop aims at bringing together researchers working in different
frameworks of word formation to discuss roots and their interaction with
grammatical formatives.

Call for Papers


Roots: Word formation from the perspective of "core lexical elements"

Across frameworks, a certain amount of consensus has emerged that word formation
involves a 'core lexical element' (also called 'root') in combination with a
structural template. The former part provides the idiosyncratic aspects of word
meaning, while the latter provides the grammatically relevant facets of word
meaning.

Despite this basic agreement, no consensus exists concerning the nature of roots
and their exact role in word formation processes. In the recent literature, we
find at least two understandings of the notion 'root' and of the term
'grammatically relevant facets of meaning'. For instance, for researchers
working within Distributed Morphology or exo-skeletal approaches, the root is
seen as the minimal invariable core which words share once all functional
formatives have been abstracted away. Roots do not determine the structures in
which they appear, and functional structure is seen as the bearer of meaning
specification. Thus grammatically relevant facets of meaning are the
structurally relevant aspects. On the other hand, for researchers such as Levin
& Rappaport Hovav, the root is the core of word meaning in that its semantics
determine the range of event structures it can combine with.

This workshop aims at bringing together researchers working in different
frameworks to discuss roots and their interaction with grammatical formatives.
Possible questions for discussion include the following:

Do roots have ontological types which constraint the structures they might be
associated with? As not all roots can occur in all contexts, how can we restrict
root insertion? Do we need diacritics on roots in order to determine this, i.e.
diacritics that determine class membership, as in e.g. Embick & Halle (2005)?
How much meaning is included in the root in isolation: no meaning at all, as
argued by Acquaviva (2007), very underspecified aspects of meaning, as stated in
Marantz (2001) and Arad (2003), fully specified meaning including argument
structure licensing, as in Levin & Rappaport Hovav (2005) and Doron (2003)?
If roots have meaning, where is this assigned? In addition, where is root
phonology assigned? When are roots inserted in the structure, early as in Embick
(2000) and Harley (2006) or late as in (Marantz 1997)? Furthermore, is
non-compositional meaning only associated with the roots themselves or can it
involve bigger chunks of structure as well, as argued by Marantz (2003), Borer
(2008), Alexiadou (2008), Harley (2008)?
Turning to the question of argument licensing, if the root determines argument
structure, does it do so on its own or via the mediation of functional
structure? Related to this question is the issue of whether external and
internal arguments are introduced in a similar or in a distinct fashion.
Finally, it has been suggested that languages differ as to the number of roots
they have for one particular class (e.g. English has many manner of motion
roots, while the Romance languages have much fewer, Levin & Rappaport Hovav
2005: 240). What is then the cross-linguistically stable semantic core? How does
the root inventory of a language interact with its functional vocabulary/event
template in order to yield variation across languages?

Invited Speakers:
Paolo Acquaviva, Hagit Borer, Edit Doron, David Embick,
Heidi Harley, Alec Marantz, Malka Rappaport Hovav

Abstract Submission:
Abstracts are invited for 40 minute talks (30'+10') relevant to the conference
theme. Submissions are limited to one single-authored and one joint-authored
abstract.

The abstracts should be sent by e-mail to: roots.workshopgooglemail.com
Please include the word ABSTRACT in the subject line of the e-mail.
In the body of the message, please include the names of the author(s),
affiliation(s), abstract title and an e-mail address.
Abstracts should take the form of a PDF document. Abstracts should be limited to
two pages (11pt font size) and a third page containing examples and references.
Abstracts should be anonymous.

Submission Deadline: 15 March 2009

Notification of Acceptance: ca. 1 April 2009
Message 2: Pidgins and Creoles in a Comparative Perspective
Date: 19-Sep-2008
From: Magnus Huber <magnus.huberanglistik.uni-giessen.de>
Subject: Pidgins and Creoles in a Comparative Perspective
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Full Title: Pidgins and Creoles in a Comparative Perspective

Date: 02-Apr-2009 - 04-Apr-2009
Location: Giessen, Hessen, Germany
Contact Person: Magnus Huber
Meeting Email: Lst.Huberanglistik.uni-giessen.de
Web Site: http://www.uni-giessen.de/anglistik/LING/Staff/huber/CW 2009/cwindex.html

Linguistic Field(s): General Linguistics

Language Family(ies): Creole

Call Deadline: 31-Oct-2008

Meeting Description:

In recent years, there has been a renewed interest in contrastive approaches in
creole studies, relating pidgins and creoles to each other as well as to other
languages. The methods and aims of these studies are diverse and include
synchronic and diachronic aspects, such as comparative, typological and
contrastive approaches, the reconstruction of earlier stages of individual
varieties, the establishment of genetic relationships within groups of pidgins
and creoles, or the comparison of the sociohistorical backgrounds of
pidgin/creole formation and their different structural or functional outcomes.


Call for Papers


In 2006, the Creolistics Workshop moved from its original home at the University
of Westminster to Giessen University, Germany. The April 2009 meeting is the
second Creolistics Workshop to be held in Giessen, which is easily accessed,
being located just over one hour by train from Frankfurt/Main, Europe's busiest
airport.

The theme of the Eighth Creolistics Workshop will be "Pidgins and creoles in a
comparative perspective". In recent years, there has been a renewed interest in
contrastive approaches in creole studies, relating pidgins and creoles to each
other as well as to other languages. The methods and aims of these studies are
diverse and include synchronic and diachronic aspects, such as
- comparative and typological approaches to pidgins and creoles,
- contrasting pidgins and creoles with "natural" languages,
- the investigation of the relationships of pidgins and creoles to their
substrates, superstrates and adstrates,
- the reconstruction of earlier stages of individual varieties,
- the establishment of genetic relationships within groups of pidgins and creoles,
- the comparison of the sociohistorical backgrounds of pidgin/creole formation
and their different structural or functional outcomes, or
- the reconstruction of proto-pidgins or communication strategies that may have
played a role in the genesis of contact languages.

Papers are invited dealing with comparative approaches to pidgin and creole
languages. Contributions in the areas of phonology, morphology, syntax and/or
the sociohistory and sociolinguistics are particularly welcome, as long as they
are firmly grounded on empirical data. Time allotted to papers is 20 minutes
plus 10 minutes discussion time. Since attendance at the last Workshop was very
high, the Eighth Creolistics Workshop will also include one or two poster
sessions, allowing participants to browse freely and exchange ideas with poster
presenters.

For those unfamiliar with poster sessions,
http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/speaking/poster/pop2a.cfm gives a good
overview of and hints for this kind of presentation.

As in previous workshops, we intend to publish a selection of the contributions
in one or more volumes. Book-planning sessions will be held at the end of the
workshop.

If you are interested in attending the workshop, please send an email to
Lst.huberanglistik.uni-giessen.de by 31 October 2008,
1. indicating whether your participation is (a) very likely (b) likely (c) less
likely.
2. If you intend to present, attach an abstract of max. 350 words including
title and references, indicating clearly whether you wish your contribution to
be (a) a paper (b) a poster (c) a paper or poster.

Notification of acceptance will be sent out by 15 November 2008. Note that after
that date, circulars (travel arrangements, accommodation, conference program,
etc.) will only be sent out to those that have expressed an interest in
attending the workshop.

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