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LINGUIST List 19.2878

Mon Sep 22 2008

Diss: Phonetics: Rutter: 'Acoustic Properties of Repair Sequences ...'

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        1.    Ben Rutter, Acoustic Properties of Repair Sequences in Dysarthric Conversational Speech: An interactional phonetic study


Message 1: Acoustic Properties of Repair Sequences in Dysarthric Conversational Speech: An interactional phonetic study
Date: 22-Sep-2008
From: Ben Rutter <bejamin-rutterouhsc.edu>
Subject: Acoustic Properties of Repair Sequences in Dysarthric Conversational Speech: An interactional phonetic study
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Institution: University of Louisiana at Lafayette
Program: Ph.D. in Applied Language and Speech Sciences
Dissertation Status: Completed
Degree Date: 2008

Author: Ben M Rutter

Dissertation Title: Acoustic Properties of Repair Sequences in Dysarthric Conversational Speech: An interactional phonetic study

Linguistic Field(s): Phonetics

Dissertation Director:
Nicole Muller
Jack Damico
Richard Ogden
Nancye Rousell
Martin J Ball

Dissertation Abstract:

The acoustic properties of intelligibility enhanced modes of speech in
disordered populations are of interest to both speech-language pathologists
and speech scientists. They inform theories of intelligibility, and point
to potential targets for conversationally focused speech therapy. Previous
studies looking at the phonetic events associated with the normal to clear
speech transformation in disordered speakers have been exclusively
experimental in nature. This dissertation used self-repair in naturally
occurring spontaneous conversational speech as a window into
intelligibility modification. The corpus of data was drawn from
conversations between three primary participants, all suffering from a
dysarthria secondary to multiple sclerosis, and several members of their
social network. Self-repair sequences were identified and extracted and
acoustic analyses were conducted in order to compare the trouble source
with the repair region. The sequential organization of the surrounding talk
was also considered in order to evaluate the communicative impact of the
repair attempts. The findings suggest that dysarthric speakers address both
the errors of the trouble source while also manipulating some global
properties of the speech signal. It was noted that repairs seemed to
exploit phonetic parameters that crossed the segmental/prosodic boundary
and interaction between short and long domain features was regularly
observed. The extent to which the modifications brought about idealized,
canonical realizations in the repaired speech was variable and some degree
of phonetic disturbance still resided in the repair. Nonetheless, repair
attempts were overwhelmingly successful, with only one failed repair
attempt found in the corpus. The findings add to the existing literature on
interactional phonetics, clear speech, intelligibility, and speech therapy
that focuses on understandability in conversation.



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