* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
LINGUIST List logo Eastern Michigan University Wayne State University *
* People & Organizations * Jobs * Calls & Conferences * Publications * Language Resources * Text & Computer Tools * Teaching & Learning * Mailing Lists * Search *
* *
LINGUIST List 19.308

Sat Jan 26 2008

Calls: General Ling/Canada; Phonology/Canada

Editor for this issue: Ania Kubisz <anialinguistlist.org>


As a matter of policy, LINGUIST discourages the use of abbreviations or acronyms in conference announcements unless they are explained in the text. To post to LINGUIST, use our convenient web form at http://linguistlist.org/LL/posttolinguist.html.
Directory
        1.    Charlotte Reinholtz, WSCLA - 13
        2.    Charles Reiss, Fifth North American Phonology Conference


Message 1: WSCLA - 13
Date: 26-Jan-2008
From: Charlotte Reinholtz <cr19queensu.ca>
Subject: WSCLA - 13
E-mail this message to a friend

Full Title: WSCLA - 13
Short Title: WSCLA

Date: 28-Mar-2008 - 30-Mar-2008
Location: Kingston, Ontario, Canada
Contact Person: Charlotte Reinholtz
Meeting Email: cr19queensu.ca
Web Site: http://www.queensu.ca/conferences/wscla13/

Linguistic Field(s): General Linguistics

Call Deadline: 22-Feb-2008

Meeting Description

13th Workshop on Structure and Constituency in Languages of the Americas

The central objective of the Workshop on Structure and Constituency in Languages
of the Americas (WSCLA) is to bring together linguists who are engaged in
research on the formal study of indigenous languages of the Americas in order to
exchange ideas across theories, language families, generations of scholars, and
academic and non-academic communities which are involved in the preservation and
revitalization of these languages.

The special theme of the workshop is Syntactic-Semantic Functions in Clause
Structure. This is an area of increasing importance in theoretical linguistics
generally, and particularly in the linguistic study of indigenous languages of
the Americas. Indigenous languages in Canada and the Americas at large possess a
wide range of phenomena that give cause for careful reconsideration of current
assumptions in linguistic theory about the content of syntactic-semantic
functions in clause structure as well as the nature of the general principles
that govern how and where these functions project in clause structure.

Call for Papers

WSCLA 13
13th Workshop on Structure and Constituency in Languages of the Americas
March 28-30, 2008
Queen's University, Kingston, Canada

Special Theme: Syntactic-Semantic Functions in Clause Structure

Invited Speaker:
Martina Wiltschko (UBC)

Languages of the Americas offer important evidence on the nature of
syntactic-semantic functions in clause structure. In particular they offer a
wide range of phenomena which give cause for careful reconsideration and further
development of current assumptions in linguistic theory about the content of
syntactic-semantic functions in clause structure as well as the nature of the
general principles that govern how and where these functions project in clause
structure.

Syntactic-semantic functions that have begun to emerge as more variable
cross-linguistically than has traditionally been assumed - in terms of their
content and/or in terms of how and where they project in clause structure -
include (but are not limited to) quantificational functions (for example focus,
negation and interrogative), anchoring functions (for example tense), and a wide
range of modalities. Existing studies of these syntactic-semantic functions in
indigenous languages of the Americas include important phonological phenomena
which remain poorly understood. One such is the occurrence, for example in many
Algonquian languages, of so-called ''second'' position particles which have the
syntactic-semantic effect of focusing the initial constituent in the clause but
may only be employed when that constituent corresponds to a phonological word
domain.

We invite abstracts that deal with all aspects of variability in the functional
structure of clauses in languages of the Americas: phonological, morphological,
syntactic and semantic. Talks will be twenty minutes (plus ten minutes discussion).

Papers in the core areas of formal linguistics (phonetics, phonology,
morphology, syntax, semantics) within any theoretical framework will also be
considered.

Following the tradition of this workshop, we dedicate the final day to a linking
between our research and important work being done on the preservation and
revitalization of languages.

Abstract Requirements:
- Abstracts are invited for twenty minute talks (and 10 minutes for discussion),
or posters.
- Abstracts should be no more than a single page, single spaced, in 12 point
Times New Roman; examples and references may be added on a second page.
- Abstracts should be submitted as a pdf document, attached to an e-mail. In
case of unusual formatting, including phonetic fonts and tree structure
diagrams, please submit a pdf.
- Please send two copies of the abstract, one with no identifying information
and a second including your name and affiliation below the title.
- Please indicate whether you would like to be considered for a talk, a poster,
or both.
- In the body of the e-mail, please include the following information:
name
title of abstract
talk or poster
affiliation
e-mail address
faculty, student or independent status.

Abstracts should be submitted to the following address:
wscla13 queensu.ca

Deadline for Abstracts to be Received:
February 22nd, 2008

Notification of Acceptance:
March 2, 2008.

Further information will be available at the conference web site:
http://www.queensu.ca/linguistics.
Message 2: Fifth North American Phonology Conference
Date: 26-Jan-2008
From: Charles Reiss <reissalcor.concordia.ca>
Subject: Fifth North American Phonology Conference
E-mail this message to a friend


Full Title: Fifth North American Phonology Conference
Short Title: NAPhC5

Date: 09-May-2008 - 11-May-2008
Location: Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Contact Person: Charles Reiss
Meeting Email: cogscialcor.concordia.ca
Web Site: http://linguistics.concordia.ca/naphc5/

Linguistic Field(s): Phonology

Call Deadline: 01-Mar-2008

Meeting Description

Fifth North American Phonology Conference
Concordia University, Montreal

Theme: Phonology as Symbolic Computation

May 9-11, 2008

Call for Papers

Fifth North American Phonology Conference
Concordia University, Montreal

Theme: Phonology as Symbolic Computation

Invited Speakers:
Andries Coetzee, Michigan
John Kingston, UMass
David Odden, Ohio State
Bridget Samuels, Harvard

Recent work in phonology has met with a number of recalcitrant problems.

1. Probabilistic and exemplar-based models of phonological learning and
phonological computation have failed to deal with the same conceptual and
empirical challenges that led to the demise of their empiricist, behaviorist
forebears.

2. Objections against the computational complexity associated with derivations
with multiple levels of representation have turned out to have been
ill-grounded, and stubborn problems of analysis have forced 'two-level'
theorists to allow complex derivations to sneak back in, as in the Stratal,
Harmonic Serialism and Candidate Chains models of recent work in Optimality Theory.

3. The grounding of constraints in markedness 'theory' remains an elusive goal
that fails on both logical and empirical grounds to provide explanations.

In this context, we invite papers on the prospects of future research in Good
Old Fashioned Phonology (GOFP, an adaptation of Haugeland's Good Old Fashioned
Artificial Intelligence). That is, we propose an exploration of phonology as a
substance-free, symbolic computation system. Papers critiquing GOFP are also
very welcome.

A substance-free theory considers the formal properties of a grammar without
regard for transduction between symbols in the grammar and the input and output
systems involved in language acquisition and use.
Relevant sources for this position in phonology and elsewhere are Hjelmslev and
Uldall (see Fudge 2006:88), Chomsky and Halle (1968), Kaplan 1987, Hale and
Reiss (2000, 2008) and Pylyshyn (2003).

Formal topics might include the use of quantifiers or operator-variable
structures, computation of locality, computational power of phonological
grammars, and formal grammar and biolinguistic considerations.

Abstracts should be sent in pdf format to cogscialcor.concordia.ca, up to
3 pages in length. Anonymity is not required.

Organizers:
Concordia Linguistics Program http://linguistics.concordia.ca
Concordia Linguistics Student Association http://linguistics.concordia.ca/lsa/
Concordia Cognitive Science Group http://linguistics.concordia.ca/ccsg/



Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue




Please report any bad links or misclassified data

LINGUIST Homepage | Read LINGUIST | Contact us

NSF Logo

While the LINGUIST List makes every effort to ensure the linguistic relevance of sites listed
on its pages, it cannot vouch for their contents.