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LINGUIST List 19.3574

Sat Nov 22 2008

Calls: Syntax/ Greece; Applied Ling/USA

Editor for this issue: Kate Wu <katelinguistlist.org>


LINGUIST is pleased to announce the launch of an exciting new feature: Easy Abstracts! Easy Abs is a free abstract submission and review facility designed to help conference organizers and reviewers accept and process abstracts online. Just go to: http://www.linguistlist.org/confcustom, and begin your conference customization process today! With Easy Abstracts, submission and review will be as easy as 1-2-3!
Directory
        1.    Anna Roussou, The Optionality of Wh-movement
        2.    Lan Ngo, 30th Annual Winter Applied Linguistics Conference


Message 1: The Optionality of Wh-movement
Date: 21-Nov-2008
From: Anna Roussou <aroussouupatras.gr>
Subject: The Optionality of Wh-movement
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Full Title: The Optionality of Wh-movement
Short Title: TOWH

Date: 03-Apr-2009 - 05-Apr-2009
Location: Thessaloniki, Greece
Contact Person: Anna Roussou
Meeting Email: whstrategygmail.com
Web Site: http://www.enl.auth.gr/symposium19/

Linguistic Field(s): Syntax

Call Deadline: 15-Dec-2008

Meeting Description:

The availability of a wh-in situ strategy in typical wh-movement languages has
recently been argued to exist in a number of typical wh-movement languages. The
pervasive availability of wh-in situ of this type turns out to be a non-trivial
issue, with implications regarding the nature of wh-movement, its effects on the
interfaces and the interaction with the lexicon. The workshop aims at
considering the properties of these constructions from a theoretical
perspective, including questions regarding the 'optionality' of wh-in situ,the
differences with 'real' in-situ, the similarities with sluicing, and the role of
islands.

Call for Papers

Workshop on 'The Optionality of Wh-movement'

The availability of a wh-in situ strategy in typical wh-movement languages was
originally discussed with respect to French (Aout et al. 1981; Cheng1991; Chang
1997; Bosković 1997, 2000; Cheng & Rooryck 2000, 2002; Starke 2001; Mathieu
2004; Baunaz 2005, 2008, a.o.). In recent years, the in-situ option has been
argued to exist in a number of languages, such as English (Ginzburg & Sag 2001,
Pires & Taylor 2007), Spanish (Uribe-Etxebarria 2002, Etxepare &
Uribe-Etxebarria 2005, Reglero 2005), European Portuguese (Cheng & Rooryck
2000), Brazilian Portuguese (Kato 2004), Egyptian Arabic (Lassadi 2004),
Malagasy (Sabel 2003), Greek (Sinopoulou 2007, Vlachos 2008) and
Babine-Witsuwit'en (Danham 2000). The wh-in situ strategy has been broadly
analyzed either as concealed (remnant or feature) movement, or as real in-situ.
Despite different implementations all approaches show that the in-situ variant
has different syntactic properties compared to its moved counterpart, e.g. lack
of island effects (a property also shared by 'sluicing') and interpretative
restrictions. It has also been pointed out that real in-situ languages give rise
to different readings depending on the presence or absence of the question
particle (Miyagawa 2001), raising the question whether these languages also
exhibit a parallel, although differently manifested, dual pattern.
The pervasive availability of wh-in situ in typical wh-movement languages turns
out to be a non-trivial issue, with implications regarding the nature of
wh-movement, its effects on the interfaces and the interaction with the lexicon.
On the PF-interface, in-situ and moved wh-questions exhibit different
intonational patterns, while on the LF interface, they provide a more restricted
set of readings, an option which is not shared by 'real' in-situ languages.

The workshop aims at considering the properties of these constructions from a
theoretical perspective, including questions such as the ones below:
- If the wh-in situ strategy is optional, how is it captured by the
computational system?
- How does 'optional' wh-in situ differ (if it does) from 'real' in-situ?
- What is the correlation between alternative strategies of wh-questions and the
properties of the lexical elements involved?
- How does 'optional' wh-in situ compare with other phenomena, such as sluicing,
in terms of interpretation and island effects? What are the implications for the
definition of islands?

The workshop will run in parallel to the general session of the 19th
International Symposium on Theoretical and Applied Linguistics (ISTAL 19),
Thessaloniki, Greece, 3-5 April 2009. Organization details will be available in
due course at: http://www.enl.auth.gr/symposium19/. Papers covering any aspect
of the properties of the wh-in-situ strategies are welcome.

Those interested can submit abstracts in .pdf format. Only electronic
submissions will be considered. Abstracts should be anonymous and 300-500 words
long (not exceeding one page A4). Send your personal information - Name,
Affiliation, and Contact Email - in the body of the message and attach the
abstract with title but without name and affiliation. Please note that only one
single or co-authored abstract can be submitted. Submissions should be sent by
15 December 2008 to the workshop email address: whstrategygmail.com (subject
'abstract submission'). Applicants will be notified on abstract acceptance by 15
January 2009.

The Organizing Committee
Anna Roussou
Christos Vlachos
Message 2: 30th Annual Winter Applied Linguistics Conference
Date: 21-Nov-2008
From: Lan Ngo <lmn2118columbia.edu>
Subject: 30th Annual Winter Applied Linguistics Conference
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Full Title: 30th Annual Winter Applied Linguistics Conference

Date: 07-Mar-2009 - 07-Mar-2009
Location: New York, NY, USA
Contact Person: LaNysha Adams
Meeting Email: Lta2101columbia.edu
Web Site: http://www.nystesol.org/sig/aplsig.html

Linguistic Field(s): Applied Linguistics

Call Deadline: 08-Jan-2009

Meeting Description:

The 30th Annual Winter Applied Linguistics Conference

Co-Sponsored by NYS TESOL Applied Linguistics SIG and Teachers College, Columbia
University
Date: Saturday, March 7, 2009
Location: Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, NY

Theme: Second/Foreign Language Research: Information Technology, Inquiry and
Interaction

Call for Papers

Featuring:
-Plenary Speakers
-Concurrent presentations throughout the day
-Poster Session
-Publisher's Exhibit

Presentation Format and Submission Guidelines:
We invite proposals for 40-minute presentations (30-minute discussion and
10-minute Q&A) on original research or pedagogical practices related to applied
linguistics. We also invite proposals for poster presentations which will be
displayed for a 2-hour block of time. Poster presentations are intended to be a
format for reports of work in progress. Preference will be given to proposals
related to the conference theme. Paper and poster selection will be competitive.
All proposals must be e-mailed.

In your email, please include:
-A one-page summary without identifying information
-A one-page summary with name, address, affiliation, and e-mail address
-A fifty-word summary for the program book
- A list of any technology requirements
- "AL Conf Paper Proposal" or "AL Conf Poster Presentation" in the subject line

Send to:
LaNysha Adams
Paper Selection Chair
Teachers College, Columbia University
Lta2101columbia.edu

Proposals are due by January 8, 2009

For questions or further information please contact the AL Conference co-chairs:
LaNysha Adams at Lta2101columbia.edu, Ya-Ting Chang at yc2418columbia.edu,
Marie-Claire Chaudoir at mc2894columbia.edu, Justin Kaley at
jrk2130columbia.edu, or Lan Ngo at Lmn2118columbia.edu

Also visit the conference website: http://www.nystesol.org/sig/aplsig.html

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