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LINGUIST List 19.404

Mon Feb 04 2008

Confs: Genetic Classification, Historical Ling, Na-Dene Family/USA

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Directory
        1.    Andrea Berez, Dene-Yeniseic Symposium


Message 1: Dene-Yeniseic Symposium
Date: 03-Feb-2008
From: Andrea Berez <aberezumail.ucsb.edu>
Subject: Dene-Yeniseic Symposium
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Dene-Yeniseic Symposium

Date: 26-Feb-2008 - 29-Feb-2008
Location: Fairbanks and Anchorage, Alaska, USA
Contact: James Kari
Contact Email: ffjmkuaf.edu
Meeting URL: http://www.uaf.edu/anlc/dy2008.html

Linguistic Field(s): General Linguistics; Genetic Classification; Historical
Linguistics

Language Family(ies): Na-Dene

Meeting Description:

An international workshop dedicated to the exploring the evidence for
linguistic, archaeological, and genetic connections between the Na-Dene
languages of North America and the Yeniseic languages of Siberia.

An international workshop dedicated to the exploring the evidence for
linguistic, archaeological, and genetic connections between the Na-Dene
languages of North America and the Yeniseic languages of Siberia.

February 26, 27 and 29, 2008
Fairbanks and Anchorage, Alaska

Overview

Athabascan-Eyak-Tlingit (Dene) is the largest language family in North America,
stretching from western Alaska south to the Mexican border, and its internal
genetic relationships have been the subject of intensive study. However, the
origins of this family outside North America have never been conclusively
demonstrated. This symposium will discuss new evidence supporting a linguistic
connection between Dene and the Yeniseic family of central Siberia. This
proposal is the first to be founded on established comparative methodology
rather than on mass comparison, and as such represents one of the most exciting
advances in historical linguistics in recent years. If proven, the Dene-Yeniseic
hypothesis will have an enormous impact on our understanding of the prehistory
and settlement of the Americas.

This workshop follows a Na-Dene workshop held August 7-8, 2006, at the
Linguistics Department of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology
in Leipzig. That workshop's purpose was to share recent advances in
reconstructing the ancient language ancestral to Athabaskan, Eyak, and Tlingit,
and further to assess progress in attempting to link it genetically with Haida
and with Ket (central Siberia), the last surviving member of the Yeniseic
language family.

Schedule in brief

Feb 26, 10:00-3:00
Worksession, Regents Conference Room, University of Alaska Fairbanks

Feb 27, 10:00-3:00
Worksession, Regents Conference Room, University of Alaska Fairbanks

Feb 27, 7:00-9:00
Public Lecture, Wood Center Ballroom, University of Alaska Fairbanks
''The Siberian Origin of Na-Dene Languages,'' presented by Prof Edward Vajda,
(Western Washington University). More information on this lecture can be found
at http://www.uaf.edu/anlc/vajda.html

Feb 29, 9:00-3:00
Special Session on the Dene-Yeniseic Hypothesis, Alaska Anthropological
Association (Anchorage Hilton)
This session will feature presentations by internationally renown researchers,
including James Kari (UAF), Bernard Comrie (Max Planck-Leipzig), Edward Vajda
(Western Washington), Jeff Leer (UAF), Johanna Nichols (Berkeley), John Ives
(Alberta), Yuri Berezkin (St Petersberg), James McNeley (Díne College),
Marie-Lucie Tarpent (Nova Scotia).

The detailed schedule can be found at
http://uaf.edu/anlc/dyschedule.pdf


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