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LINGUIST List 19.894

Mon Mar 17 2008

TOC: Language in Society 37/2 (2008)

Editor for this issue: Fatemeh Abdollahi <fatemehlinguistlist.org>

Directory
        1.    Daniel Davies, Language in Society Vol 37, No 2 (2008)


Message 1: Language in Society Vol 37, No 2 (2008)
Date: 14-Mar-2008
From: Daniel Davies <ddaviescambridge.org>
Subject: Language in Society Vol 37, No 2 (2008)
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
http://us.cambridge.org

Journal Title: Language in Society
Volume Number: 37
Issue Number: 2
Issue Date: 2008


Main Text:

Sign language contact and interference: ASL and LSM
David Quinto-Pozos

“They live in Lonesome Dove”: Media and contemporary Western Apache place-naming
practices
M. Nevins

Construing confrontation: Grammar in the construction of a key historical
narrative in Umpithamu
Jean-Christophe Verstraete, Barbara De Cock

Colonial dialect contact in the history of European languages: On the
irrelevance of identity to new-dialect formation
Peter Trudgill

Colonization, population contacts, and the emergence of new language varieties:
A response to Peter Trudgill
Salikoko Mufwene

Identity formation and accommodation: Sequential and simultaneous relations
Donald Tuten

Accommodation versus identity? A response to Trudgill
Edgar Schneider

The delicate constitution of identity in face-to-face accommodation: A response
to Trudgill
Nikolas Coupland

A question of identity: A response to Trudgill
Laurie Bauer

Contact is not enough: A response to Trudgill
Janet Holmes, Paul Kerswill

On the role of children, and the mechanical view: A rejoinder
Peter Trudgill

Anne O'Keeffe, Investigating media discourse. London: Routledge. 2006.
Peter A. Cramer

Alessandro Duranti (ed.), A companion to linguistic anthropology. Malden, MA:
Blackwell, 2004, 2006.
Janet McIntosh

Deborah Cameron & Don Kulick (eds.), The language and sexuality reader. London &
New York: Routledge, 2006.
Anna Livia

Ian Hutchby, Media talk: Conversation analysis and the study of broadcasting.
Berkshire, UK: Open University Press, 2006.
Michal Hamo

Louis de Saussure & Peter Schulz (eds.), Manipulation and ideologies in the
twentieth century: Benjamins, 2005.
Teun van Dijk

Donal A. Carbaugh, Cultures in conversation. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum, 2005.
Adrienne Lo

Roger W. Shuy, Linguistics in the courtroom: A practical guide. New York: Oxford
University Press, 2006.
Ronald R. Butters

Sali Tagliamonte, Analysing sociolinguistic variation
Kirk Hazen

Jane Sunderland, Language and gender: An advanced resource book. London & New
York: Routledge, 2006.
Rose Rickford, Celia Kitzinger

Rhiannon Bury, Cyberspaces of their own: Female fandoms online. New York: Peter
Lang, 2005.
J. W. Unger

Michael A. K. Halliday, On grammar. London: Continuum, 2002.
J. W. Unger

Durk Gorter (ed.), Linguistic landscape: A new approach to multilingualism.
Clevedon: Multilingual Matters, 2006.
Thomas D. Mitchell

Bronwen Martin and Felizitas Ringham, Key terms in semiotics. London & New York:
Continuum, 2006.
Nathan S. Atkinson

Helen Sauntson & Sakis Kyratzis (eds.), Language, sexualities and desires:
Cross-cultural perspectives. Hampshire & New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007.
Emily Klein

Wilson McLeod (ed.), Revitalising Gaelic in Scotland. Edinburgh: Dunedin
Academic Press, 2006.
Dave Sayers

Alexander Bergs, Social networks and historical sociolinguistics: Studies in
morphosyntactic variation in the Paston letters (1421–1503). Berlin: Mouton de
Gruyter, 2005.
Anastassia Zabrodskaja

Publications Received (Through 23 October 2007)


Linguistic Field(s): Morphology
                            Sociolinguistics
                            Syntax
                            Historical Linguistics




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