LINGUIST List 2.259

Thursday, 30 May 1991

Disc: Hindi, Pseudo-Obliques, Himself, Acronyms

Editor for this issue: <>


Directory

  1. David E Newton, Hindi Loanwords
  2. Lesli LaRocco, PSEUDO-OBLIQUE SUBJECTS
  3. , Herself/himself in Hiberno-English
  4. Herb Stahlke, RE: Acronyms

Message 1: Hindi Loanwords

Date: Tue, 28 May 91 19:20 GMT
From: David E Newton <DEN1vaxb.york.ac.uk>
Subject: Hindi Loanwords
I am intending to do some work on the borrowing of Hindi
words into the English language. This would be done in a
historical perspective, and taken specifically from the
viewpoint of the history of the English language, though
some work on the borrowing of English words into Hindi 
might also be relevant.

If anyone can give me any information on this topic, or 
knows of any useful reading matter on the subject, I would
be very grateful.

Thanks!

David E Newton
Department of Language and Linguistic Science
University of York
Heslington
York YO1 5DD

den1uk.ac.york.vaxa
den1uk.ac.york.vaxb
den1uk.ac.york.worda
den1uk.ac.york.wordb
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Message 2: PSEUDO-OBLIQUE SUBJECTS

Date: Tue, 28 May 91 10:07:29 EDT
From: Lesli LaRocco <OZVYCORNELLA.cit.cornell.edu>
Subject: PSEUDO-OBLIQUE SUBJECTS
For Rick Wojcik:
You might want to have a look at an article called "Prepositional Quantifiers a
nd the Direct Case Condition in Russian," by Leonard Babby in a volume called
_Issues in Russian Morphosyntax_ MS Flier and D Brecht, eds, Slavica. It seems
to deal with a similar question in Russian.
Lesli laRocco
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Message 3: Herself/himself in Hiberno-English

Date: Tue, 28 May 91 16:14 GMT
From: <FEHN23%UJVAX.ULSTER.AC.UKCUNYVM.CUNY.EDU>
Subject: Herself/himself in Hiberno-English
In Hiberno-English, at least in my (Northern) variety and the others I am
aware of, uses non-reflexive 'herself' and 'himself', not as substitutes
for 'she herself' and 'he himself', but meaning 'the woman/man of the house'
or 'the boss'. Thus a sentence like:
John said that himself wrote it
cannot mean
John said that he himself wrote it
but only
John said that the boss/the man of the house wrote it
Thus 'herself/himself' are not reduced forms of pronoun plus emphatic. As
regards the history of the development of the use of -self forms in this way,
I'm afraid I can't help
Alison Henry
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Message 4: RE: Acronyms

Date: Tue, 28 May 91 09:15 EST
From: Herb Stahlke <00HFSTAHLKE%BSUVAX1.BITNETUICVM.uic.edu>
Subject: RE: Acronyms
RE: Bob Hoberman's note on Jewish acronymic names:

The acronymic name "Schub" also looks like a German transliteration of the
Hebrew root meaning "return." Is this significant or accidental, and do other
acronymic names also have meaning in Hebrew? Is this a factor in the selection
of acronyms as names?

 Herb Stahlke
 Ball State University

[End Linguist List, Vol. 2, No. 259]
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