LINGUIST List 2.286

Thursday, 13 June 1991

Qs: Arabic, Long distance, Dict's, and more

Editor for this issue: <>


Directory

  1. , Frequency list for Arabic/Persian/Urdu/Pashto?
  2. Jan Olsen, Long distance scrambling
  3. , machine readable dictionaries
  4. Dr M Sebba, query / request for a favour
  5. "And Rosta, Munsell Colour chips
  6. "Bruce Fraser", Marker Doubling
  7. , phonetics
  8. "ACAD3A::FFJAL1", Moods

Message 1: Frequency list for Arabic/Persian/Urdu/Pashto?

Date: Mon, 10 Jun 1991 19:02:13 PDT
From: <Diane_L._Olsen.osbu_north%xerox.comRICEVM1.RICE.EDU>
Subject: Frequency list for Arabic/Persian/Urdu/Pashto?
One of my coworkers here at Xerox is making enhancements to our
Arabic/Persian/Urdu/Pashto word-processing software and has need of a list (for
any of those four languages) of the relative frequency of occurrence of the
letters in the alphabet -- something like the "ETAONRISHRDLU..." list for
English. Does anyone know where she might find such a list?

Please send replies to iwoo.osbu_northxerox.com, not to me. Thanks in
advance!

Diane L. Olsen
Multilingual Development
Xerox Corporation
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Message 2: Long distance scrambling

Date: Tue, 11 Jun 91 17:56:03 +0200
From: Jan Olsen <olsen%unipas.fmi.uni-passau.deRICEVM1.RICE.EDU>
Subject: Long distance scrambling
I'm trying to find out which syntactic properties (if any) are correlated
with the phenomenon of long distance scrambling. Examples of languages
with the latter property I know of are: Hindi, Japanese, Korean, Russian,
Makua, Turkish and Hungarian. They seem to have one thing in common, but
before I'm going to make any claims about univerals, I'd like to have
a look at more languages - so if you know other languages in which
constituents of a complement clause may be scrambled into the matrix clause,
please tell me.
Gisbert Fanselow (fanselowunipas.fmi.uni-passau.de)
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Message 3: machine readable dictionaries

Date: Wed, 12 Jun 91 17:16:46 CST
From: <SCHIERH%DHDIBM1.bitnetRICEVM1.RICE.EDU>
Subject: machine readable dictionaries
The access to machine readable dictionaries seems to be quite different in
every language and/or country. Especially for German good machine readable
one's are rarities.
I'm searching for commercialy available mono/bilingual machine readable
dictionaries for the main languages (i.e. English, French, Spanish, Italian,
Japanese, Dutch, German, ...) and perhaps a short description about the size,
linguistic categories (phonetics, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics,
...), medium (CD-ROM, disk, ...), price, and - if possible - an advice of
an "expert" about quality.
Thanks for any response.

MfG
Stefan Schierholz
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Message 4: query / request for a favour

Date: Wed, 12 Jun 91 11:18:30 +0100
From: Dr M Sebba <eia023central1.lancaster.ac.uk>
Subject: query / request for a favour
Is there any kind person who could supply me with 2000 words (or less)
of modern colloquial HAWAIIAN, the subject immaterial, in one of the
following forms:
1. Machine readable, e.g. via email
2. As a clear, clean photocopy or printout, suitable for feeding into
an optical character reader?

Mark Sebba
Dept. of Linguistics
University of Lancaster, Lancaster LA1 4YT, England
Telephone (0524) 65201 ext. 2241 (W) (0524) 69223 (H)
Fax: (0524) 843085
e-mail: eia023uk.ac.lancaster.central1
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Message 5: Munsell Colour chips

Date: Wed, 12 Jun 91 19:12:53 +0100
From: "And Rosta <ucleaarucl.ac.uk>
Subject: Munsell Colour chips
How can one obtain Munsell colour chips?
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Message 6: Marker Doubling

Date: Thu, 13 Jun 91 14:18:36 EDT
From: "Bruce Fraser" <>
Subject: Marker Doubling
I am looking at doubled discourse markers such as English "come come"
"now now" "there there" in which the phrase meaning does not reflect
the meaning of the doubled constituent. These are different from doublets
such as "yes yes" in which the "yes" retains its customary meaning, and
different from adjective doublets such as "piano piano" in Italian.
Any idea/help from other languages or references would be much appreciated.
Thanks in advance. Bruce Fraser SED91LNBUACCA

save send
Thanks in advance. Bruce Fraser SED91LNBUACCA
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Message 7: phonetics

Date: Thu, 13 Jun 91 16:44:11 CDT
From: <FREE0927VMD.CSO.UIUC.EDU>
Subject: phonetics
Hi you'll
I need to analyse the frequency, intensity, and time of vowel sounds
in French pronounced by American subjects. I am looking for a program
on Mac or Ibm that would could analyse sounds pronounced into the
computer.
for example, in the sentence "Il n'a pas pu/ parce qu'il avait bu", I
want to analyse the segment "pu" in terms of frequency, intensity, and
time
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Message 8: Moods

Date: Thu, 13 Jun 91 13:44:37 -0900
From: "ACAD3A::FFJAL1" <FFJAL1%ALASKA.BITNETCORNELLC.cit.cornell.edu>
Subject: Moods
Is there an agreed-upon term for moods that express a desire for
something to happen: Imperative, Hortative, Prohibitive, etc.?
The usual term in traditional Western grammars is "Subjunctive"
which seems to me rather misleading, as it implies dependent
status. Isn't there anything better? And for that matter, is
there an agreed-upon taxonomic terminology for moods in general?

[End Linguist List, Vol. 2, No. 0286]
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