LINGUIST List 2.454

Mon 02 Sep 1991

Disc: Reported speech, "On", Kinship, Wh-

Editor for this issue: <>


Directory

  1. "Pamela, RE: Queries
  2. Elissa Feit, Re: Responses: Software, Addresses, "On"
  3. , "on" this theory
  4. , Re: Queries
  5. Nicholas Ostler, Mama and Papa
  6. "Charles A. Bigelow", Re: Wh-, Sound Change

Message 1: RE: Queries

Date: 1 Sep 91 11:07:00 EDT
From: "Pamela <psaundersguvax.georgetown.edu>
Subject: RE: Queries
For work done on reported speech or "constructed
dialogue" see Deborah Tannen's book, Talking Voices. Also
Greg Urban's article entitled, "The I of Discourse", in Semiotics,
Self, and Society, ed. by Lee and Urban, 1986, which directly
addresses both direct and indirect quotations. Also work done
by Gisela Redecker, but I don't know any specific references.
--pam saunders
psaundersguvax.georgetown.edu
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Message 2: Re: Responses: Software, Addresses, "On"

Date: Tue, 27 Aug 91 14:17:53 EDT
From: Elissa Feit <feitcs.Buffalo.EDU>
Subject: Re: Responses: Software, Addresses, "On"
 Gilbert Harman <ghhconfidence.Princeton.EDU> writes:
	The use of "on" rather than "in" in this context has been
	common in philosophical writing (and probably elsewhere) for
	years. I still resent the first time a copy editor changed
	my "On X's view..." to "In X's view..." When I
	discussed this with colleagues, many of them thought that
	"On X's view..." was quite normal. This must have been 20
	years ago.
...
A little fuel for the fire 8-) :
I think there is, in fact, a difference in meaning between "on X's
view..." and "in X's view...", where "on" signals a meta-argument
concerning the overall view or analysis (similar to "with regards
to...") while "in" signals a reference to specific details within that
view, or analysis.
Elissa Feit (feitcs.buffalo.edu)
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Message 3: "on" this theory

Date: Tue, 27 Aug 91 15:01 CDT
From: <TB0NRN1%NIU.BITNETRICEVM1.RICE.EDU>
Subject: "on" this theory
Besides "on this theory" etc. in linguistic parlance, "on" has
become increasingly common in sports statistics phrasing, e.g.
"on the year" "on the season" . This usage goes back at least
ten years or so.
Neal R. Norrick tb0nrn1niu.bitnet
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Message 4: Re: Queries

Date: Tue, 27 Aug 1991 22:12 EDT
From: <BELMORE%Vax2.Concordia.CApucc.PRINCETON.EDU>
Subject: Re: Queries
"on X's view" etc. sounds as wierd to me as it does to you.
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Message 5: Mama and Papa

Date: Mon, 26 Aug 1991 00:59 +0100
From: Nicholas Ostler <M6716eurokom.ie>
Subject: Mama and Papa
Japanese "haha" < *papa means "mother".
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Message 6: Re: Wh-, Sound Change

Date: Tue, 27 Aug 91 17:47:47 PDT
From: "Charles A. Bigelow" <bigelowSunburn.Stanford.EDU>
Subject: Re: Wh-, Sound Change
In a nice discussion of the wh- words, Jack Rea asks "What is the
first word of _Beowulf_?" It might not be giving away the answer to
say that in the unique manuscript, the first word is spelled: "H Wen
Ash T", where wen (wynn) is a letter of runic origin and ash (aesc)
is an ae ligature.
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