LINGUIST List 2.532

Tue 17 Sep 1991

Disc: That's

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  1. , Re: That's
  2. , Re: That's
  3. , that's

Message 1: Re: That's

Date: Mon, 16 Sep 91 12:49:09 EDT
From: <pesetskATHENA.MIT.EDU>
Subject: Re: That's
Lachlan Mackenzie writes "As a native speaker of Scottish English, I can
confirm that *the book that's cover is red* is perfectly normal in
Scottish English. So, to answer David Pesetzky's question, is *the book
that's cover Mary tore*."
How about plural antecedents:
	The books that's covers Mary tore.
--to "scotch" the idea (so to speak) that the -s is a reduction of
'its'. It occurs to me that 'The book that's cover Mary tore' could
still be a reduction of 'The book that its cover Mary tore', as someone
suggested for simpler cases.
(I hope the word "scotch" isn't pejorative to a Scottish ear.)
-David Pesetsky
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Message 2: Re: That's

Date: Mon, 16 Sep 91 14:48 EST
From: <NMILLERvax1.trincoll.edu>
Subject: Re: That's
Without prejudice to anything of substance already written
on this weighty issue, may I respectfully suggest that the
term in question be written without an apostrophe? Or even
spelled 'thatse'?
Norman Miller
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Message 3: that's

Date: Tue, 17 Sep 91 10:14:25 EST
From: <RGAGNEucs.indiana.edu>
Subject: that's
On reading the recent list of possible ways to say "the book whose cover
is red"/"the book the cover of which is red" etc., I was struck by the
absence of the way I would always say it: "the book with the red cover".
Me for avoidance every time. I should imagine that a study of this pheno-
menon would have to take such cowardly detours into consideration.
--Elise Morse-Gagne
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