LINGUIST List 2.564

Fri 27 Sep 1991

Misc: Responses

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  1. Hugo QuenE, Re: 2.559 Responses: Soviet language, warning, kilometer, etc.
  2. "Bruce E. Nevin", Thanks for 'm-a=nu-el etymology
  3. "Norval Smith, Re: ite
  4. "Michael Kac", Re: 2.560 Responses: Professeure, IPA fonts
  5. bert peeters, Tu / vous
  6. "Michael Kac", Re: 2.559 Responses: Soviet language, warning, kilometer, etc.

Message 1: Re: 2.559 Responses: Soviet language, warning, kilometer, etc.

Date: Fri, 27 Sep 91 14:33 GMT
From: Hugo QuenE <Hugo.Quenelet.ruu.nl>
Subject: Re: 2.559 Responses: Soviet language, warning, kilometer, etc.
In response to the question by Christophe Fouquere (LIPN Paris-N France):
> Does anybody know where I can find corpora of errors done by learners ?
> This research concerns mainly the acquisition of French, but English corpora
> will be ok.
the following dissertation concentrates on perceptual errors by L2 learners:
Koster, C.J. (1987) Word recognition in foreign and native language: effects
 of context and assimilation. Dordrecht: Foris. [also dissertation Utrecht
 University].
two other publications on L2 perceptual errors, mentioned in the above:
Greene, A. (1969) Pullet Surprises. Glennview IL: Scott, Foresman & Co.
Angelis, P.J. (1974) Listening comprehension and error analysis. In: G. Nickel
 (ed.) Proceedings of the 3rd congress of the Association Internationale de
 Linguistique Appliquee. Heidelberg: Julius Groos. volume 1, pp. 1-11.
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Message 2: Thanks for 'm-a=nu-el etymology

Date: Fri, 27 Sep 91 09:06:06 EDT
From: "Bruce E. Nevin" <bnevinccb.bbn.com>
Subject: Thanks for 'm-a=nu-el etymology
Thank you all for your informative responses. A colleague could not
find it in the Hebrew dictionary at his synagogue and his curiousity
was piqued.
I have it that it is 'm "with" (a)nu "us" el one of the principal names
for God.
	Bruce Nevin
	bnbbn.com
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Message 3: Re: ite

Date: Thu, 26 Sep 91 10:37 MET
From: "Norval Smith <NSMITHalf.let.uva.nl>
Subject: Re: ite
In Strathearn, Perthshire, Scotland the inhabitants of Crieff and Comrie
refer to themselves as Crieffites and Comrieites, without any pejorative
sense as far as I can gather. "a real Crieffite" would mean someone whose
roots were in Crieff. Whether you used this expression pejoratively or not
would depend on your attitude to the town itself.
Norval Smith
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Message 4: Re: 2.560 Responses: Professeure, IPA fonts

Date: Thu, 26 Sep 91 17:28:23 -0500
From: "Michael Kac" <kaccs.umn.edu>
Subject: Re: 2.560 Responses: Professeure, IPA fonts
Suggested reply to all those who deplore the use of *hopefully* as a
sentence adverb: Frankly, my dear, I don't give a damn.
Michael Kac
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Message 5: Tu / vous

Date: Thu, 26 Sep 91 10:50:01 EST
From: bert peeters <peeterstasman.cc.utas.edu.au>
Subject: Tu / vous
> Date: Mon, 23 Sep 91 20:41:10 -0700
> From: slobincogsci.Berkeley.EDU (Dan I. Slobin)
>
> Shortly after the October Revolution, Lenin proposed that all
> Soviet citizens address each other with the formal "vy," on
> the rationalization that all of the people had become the
> owners and controllers of the society. He reported that he,
> personally, had found it awkward to shift from "ty" to "vy"
> in addressing old friends. I don't know how long this reform
> was advocated, but it clearly did not catch on. (It is
> interesting that a similar effort was made after the French
> Revolution, but in the opposite direction. There it was
> directed that all citizens address each other as "tu," since
> the aristocracy had been established. That reform didn't
> take hold either.)
I feel it should be pointed out in this context that *tu* is
increasingly popular in French these days, even when talking to
absolute strangers. It struck me first when I was in Quebec in
1983. I had just had a meal at a local "creperie" and was about
to settle the bill, when the cashier girl asked me: "Tu as bien
mange'?" I was almost too shocked at that unexpected "tu" to be
able to give a proper answer. Since that time, however, I have
grown used to being addressed in the second person singular by
people I have never met - although I find it hard, even impossible,
to reciprocate.
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Message 6: Re: 2.559 Responses: Soviet language, warning, kilometer, etc.

Date: Wed, 25 Sep 91 18:13:59 -0500
From: "Michael Kac" <kaccs.umn.edu>
Subject: Re: 2.559 Responses: Soviet language, warning, kilometer, etc.
Re regularized plurals in new or metaphorical senses:
 Toronto Maple Leafs (hockey team)
 speeded ('exceeded the speed limit')
 flied ('hit a fly ball')
Another example that comes to mind, from a talk I heard by Alec Marantz:
if you see two people in Mickey Mouse costumes, you see two Mickey Mouses
not two Mickey Mice.
Just data, no analysis ... but the examples are fun. Actually, I've heard
both *mouses* and *mice* to refer to mouses.
Michael Kac
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